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Addison's Disease Message Board


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[QUOTE=robinhy]For me I have the same problems with armour as I do with synthetic, t4 only. How about you? Since you're not taking armour what do you take?[/QUOTE]

Ahhh, I'm sorry, I didn't understand this. I've been on meds for about 5 years, most of that time has been Levoxyl. That's what I went back to when I stopped taking the Armour.

After this recent Armour mess, I decided (upon other people's advice on this and Thyroid board) to treat the adrenals first and worry about the thyroid second. So, I'm currently trying adrenal glandulars, and I've noticed some improvement. I just ordered some Isocort (not exactly sure how Isocort is different from glandulars except that Isocort is sheep adrenal, and I'm taking bovine adrenal, but I'm willing to give it a try.).

If Isocort doesn't work, I'm going to push my doc or find a doc who is willing to try Cortef. After adrenals are better, then I may start messing around with Levoxyl/Cytomel or Synthroid/Cytomel, but I'm hoping that I may not even need to do anything. I'm thinking that if I get my adrenals under control that my thyroid stuff may balance out as well.

Here's something I just found in Dr. Kenneth Blanchard's book [I]What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Hypothyroidism[/I]:

Part of the problem in distinguishing the two conditions [menopause and hypothyroidism] is that they are closely linked. As catalysts for metabolism, thyroid hormones affect all cells, including the production of progesterone and estrogen in ovarian tissue. In addition, estrogens can reduce the effect of thyroid hormone and lock it out from receptor sites on tissue cells. As a result, thyroid hormone fails to reach its metabolic destination. In addition, estrogen increases the level of ciculating carrier proteins, resulting in a shortage of free, active thyroid hormones.

I'm not sure my point with this quote, but it seems to support what you've read about estrogen reducing thyroid? Sorry if I'm getting confused on this.

Anyway, have you checked out Dr. Lee's book [I]What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause[/I]? I've read his [I]What Your...PreMenopause[/I], and I found the info very helpful.

I'll keep the board posted on my adrenal glandulars/Isocort adventures. Maybe it will help someone in the future.

Christy

P.S. If the thyroid meds make you feel bad, what happens to your symptoms when you quit taking the thyroid? What happens to your TSH/T4/T3 levels?
Robin,

Good morning! I'm still on the Levoxyl. After the Armour, I went back to the Levoxyl. I don't know what would happen if I quit taking thyroid, but I don't think it's a good idea to find out. So, if your TSH went up to 30, then I would think going off thyroid meds isn't a good idea for you either.

As far as knowing if the adrenal supplements are working, I'm looking for improvement in my hypoglycemia, depression and brain fog to feel like I am getting benefits from the glandulars. I am already seeing a big improvement in my hypoglycemia, but the depression and brain fog are still pretty bad.

Cortef is natural cortisone, Isocort is sheep adrenals, and I'm currently taking bovine adrenals. I don't really know the difference between the Isocort and regular adrenal glandulars. I have read that Isocort contains 2.5 mg of natural cortisone per tablet, but I don't know if this is something that has been added or if it means that all glandulars inherently have some amount of natural cortisone in them. I'm not sure. Maybe someone can help clarify here?

As far as a synthetic adrenal hormone, I've not heard of this. Maybe someone could also comment on this?

Christy





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