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Blood and Blood Vessel Message Board


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what does it mean with lab test results of anisocytosis and poikilocytosis,
66.5 lymphocytes and 25.8 neutrophil,
68 MCV and 22.2 MCH
[QUOTE=Faye7;3482078]what does it mean with lab test results of anisocytosis and poikilocytosis,
66.5 lymphocytes and 25.8 neutrophil,
68 MCV and 22.2 MCH[/QUOTE]
Anisocytosis means that your RBCs are unequal size--indicating that some of your red blood cells are either too big or too small (usually caused by some type of anemia). For instance, iron deficient anemia will usually cause cells to be smaller than normal. Because some of the RBCs are normal size and some are smaller than normal, there will be anisocytosis, or "RBCs of unequal size."

Poikilocytosis means that some of the RBCs are abnormally shaped. There are many different abnormal shapes (burr, sickle, tear drop, elliptical). Many of these are also associated with anemia. There could be other causes, too, but I believe anemia is one of the more common causes.

If you are anemic, it is important to determine the *cause* of the anemia, and not simply to treat it.

"66.5 lymphocytes and 25.8 neutrophil,"
I *think* the lymphocyte percentage is high here, possibly indicating infection of some sort. But it's also really important what the absolute WBC count is--are there more WBC than normal? You need some additional info here.


"68 MCV and 22.2 MCH"
The Mean Corpuscular Volume is low here--meaning the average size of your RBCs is small, often associated with IDA (iron deficient anemia).

The MCH (Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin) is also low. This is a measure of the average hemoglobin per cell. Also indicative of a microcytic anemia, like IDA.

Ask your doctor about checking your iron levels--particularly ferritin. This tells you what your iron stores are in your body. If your hemoglobin/hematocrit values were normal, but your iron is low, you're probably on your way to developing IDA.

Again, no matter what the type of anemia, it is important to determine what is causing it. Malabsorption of nutrients (celiac disease, Crohn's disease, etc.), bleeding (though the GI tract or somewhere else), chronic disease (kidney failure) can all cause anemia.

Good luck.





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