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FUZ- When I was in my mid-thirties, I went through a couple of years of feeling lightheaded, "dizzy-ish", just weird.
I felt not "grounded", unsteady, even though my gait was perfect. I always felt "tippy", like I MIGHT lose my balance, but never did.
One of the best descriptions I could come up with was a feeling of "sea-legs", as if I'd just stepped off a boat. The earth seemed to be moving underneath me inappropriately.
Regular doc ran a battery of tests, all bloods and urine normal. Neurologist gave me a thorough work-up and found all systems A-Okay.
I had a brain scan and tomographies of my inner ear...eveything normal.
The sensations alone made me fearful and anxious and exacerbated everything.
It was a vicious cycle. The sensations lead to fear which lead to more feelings of "tippiness" which lead to even more anxiety and on and on.

Low doses of tranquillizers helped and I also saw a therapist for a while who helped calm me enormously, because by this time I was sure I had some occult disease that everyone had missed. Along the way, I discovered I had some pretty important issues in my life that I was avoiding which I really hadn't been aware of.

The bottom line is that eventually the symptoms subsided and then disappeared entirely.
Not saying that your symptoms are psychological, but you should know that lightheadness is a common sign of anger, depression,and anxiety. If you continue to feel lousy, see a neuro person, if for no other reason than to rule out things neurological and reassure you.

These symptoms sometimes appear for no apparent reason and disappear for no apparent reason!

zuzu xx
[QUOTE=zuzu8]FUZ- When I was in my mid-thirties, I went through a couple of years of feeling lightheaded, "dizzy-ish", just weird.
I felt not "grounded", unsteady, even though my gait was perfect. I always felt "tippy", like I MIGHT lose my balance, but never did.
One of the best descriptions I could come up with was a feeling of "sea-legs", as if I'd just stepped off a boat. The earth seemed to be moving underneath me inappropriately.
Regular doc ran a battery of tests, all bloods and urine normal. Neurologist gave me a thorough work-up and found all systems A-Okay.
I had a brain scan and tomographies of my inner ear...eveything normal.
The sensations alone made me fearful and anxious and exacerbated everything.
It was a vicious cycle. The sensations lead to fear which lead to more feelings of "tippiness" which lead to even more anxiety and on and on.

Low doses of tranquillizers helped and I also saw a therapist for a while who helped calm me enormously, because by this time I was sure I had some occult disease that everyone had missed. Along the way, I discovered I had some pretty important issues in my life that I was avoiding which I really hadn't been aware of.

PLEASE REPLY!!!!!!

Oh my lord,

This is what is wrong with me!! its so frightening! may I ask did you actually feel like your balance was off and like to steady yourself. I get that same the ground is moving thing too under my feet - its so scary!! I can get myself all into a state and I am at the stage where I dont want to go out incase it gets worse. I have also had this vile feeling that i am going to pass ot but never do. Like you I am so SCARED of the symptoms I am in a vicious cycle too. i am seeing a neuro this month and am praying for some answers. i have had an mri which is fine. I have had a posturograph tests too which shows that my balance is not normal for my age and indicates some inner ear issue. But its weird my symptoms are there 24/7 were yours? and did you find that they vary in intensity? how did you feel if you stood still? could you feel movement?So funny bout the occult disease that is sooooo where I am at with this deal. Did it make you nervous to walk and all? its funny I look perfect but feel like hell.
My life feels like one massive - I cannot do that ot go out or function as I feel so strange!!!!!!!

Thanks!!
Hi willsmom-
Yes, I indeed avoided a lot of things...walking made me feel frightened..Simply going out anywhere did. Like you, I looked great and it was hard for my friends to understand how lousy I felt. I never actually has brief "dizzy spells".I just felt unsteady, lightheaded, un-grounded, 'floaty" all the time. But no true "vertigo" which I will get to in a moment. I am not familiar with the term "post-urography test", sorry, but I failed the test where you are standing, then fold your arms, put heel to toe and then CLOSE YOUR EYES. I toppled over every time. I can't remember if I felt worse in the dark...I think so.
Now, here's what I know about dizziness...it may be more information than you'll ever need but I hope by the time this post ends you'll feel somewhat reassured.

Dizziness is a very rich problem because it contains pieces of internal medicine, a lot of neurology, a lot of otolaryngology [ear, nose, and throat medicine], and a lot of psychiatry.
By now your doctor has probably figured out which kind of "dizziness" you are experiencing. There are four distinct types: vertigo, lightheadedness, disequilibrium, and anxiety.

Type 1 -- VERTIGO

Vertigo is the feeling of motion when there is no motion.

It's a feeling common to every child who's spun himself around and around. But if it happens in the course of normal daily living, it is a symptom, one that accounts for about half of all "dizzy" complaints.

Vertigo means there is a problem with the vestibular system of the inner ear -- the part of the nervous system that tells you which way is down (the sense of gravity), and also lets you sense the position of your head.
There are two very common causes of vertigo:
Infectious agents, such as the viruses that cause the common cold or diarrhea.This harmless condition usually goes away by itself within 6-8 weeks, although drugs are available if it is severe.
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo or BPPV. This is another harmless condition caused by movement of a calcium particle in the inner ear the size of a grain of sand -- from the part of the ear that senses gravity to the part that senses head position.You feel as if your head is turning when it isn't. A two-minute therapy done right in the doctor's office can move this particle ( called the otolith) back where it belongs and fix the problem.


Another cause of vertigo is Meniere's disease, a disorder characterized by long-lasting episodes of severe vertigo. Usually there are episodes of nausea and vomiting as well.
Other typical symptoms of Meniere's disease are tinnitus -- a roaring and obnoxious buzzing, ringing or other noises in the ear. Also a feeling of pressure or fullness in the ear. My stepmother had Meniere's and it is very treatable, once diagnosed properly.

By the way, you said something very interesting. You used the word "BOUNCING".
This is a classic symptom of something called DANDY'S SYNDROME.

Dandy's syndrome is when everything bounces up and down.One of the causes of Dandy's is from taking certain antibiotics that are toxic for the ears. Had you taken any antibiotics before this all started? The world bounces up and down and sometimes all you can do is put your head against a building and hold on. Even a heartbeat will can make the world jump.

THE GOOD NEWS IS that Dandy's syndrome usually improves and disappears over time.

Regarding vertigo in general, people with vertigo from a truly serious cause (now pay attention here! This is meant to reassure you!) also have other symptoms, the most important of which are double vision and slurred speech. It would be VERY UNCOMMON to have only vertigo and to have a very serious [central nervous system] disease.

Then we have the second type of dizziness --Type 2- LIGHTHEADEDNESS. ...which is basically the feeling that one is about to faint.

Like vertigo, everyone knows what this feels like because we all know what it's like to breathe deeply enough times to produce a sensation of lightheadedness. Usually, lightheadedness is caused by some surrounding circumstance impairing blood flow to the brain when a person is standing up.

Blame this problem on our ancestors who learned to walk upright -- putting our brain above our heart. It's a challenge for the heart to keep the brain supplied with blood -- and it's easy for this system to break down.

When blood vessels in the brain become dilated, or expand, due to high temperature, excitement or hyperventilation, alcohol consumption, or prescription medications such as antidepressants, a person can become lightheaded.

Most of the time, lightheadedness is harmless. It becomes more of a concern if it occurs in an older person, in a person not on suspect drugs, or if it happens while exercising.

The next type of dizziness.. Type 3- DISEQUILIBRIUM ...creates a problem with walking. People feel unsteady on their feet, like they are going to fall.

Disorders that can cause disequilibrium include:

A kind of arthritis in the neck called cervical spondylosis, which puts pressure on the spinal cord.
Parkinson's disease, or related disorders that cause a person to stoop forward.
Disorders involving a part of the brain called the cerebellum.
Diseases such as diabetes (when the diabetic develops neuropathy (loss of sensation) in their legs. This is not you obviously or you would certainly have told us!!
Disequilibrium is diagnosed when your doc conducts a simple neurological exam and watches you walk.

Then there's the all-inclusive nightmare--Type 4- ANXIETY

People who are scared, worried, depressed, or agoraphobic [afraid of open spaces]sometimes use the word dizzy to mean frightened, depressed, or anxious.

There's a fascinating "test" that very savvy doctors use to recognize this type of dizziness. They take the word 'dizzy' out of all the patient's sentences and replace it with the word 'anxious", "scared" or "depressed"...and the sentences suddenly make a lot more sense! This doesn't mean the dizziness isn't very real and experienced as one or MORE of the 4 "types".

But this leads me now to what they call MIXED-TYPE DIZZINESS:
This means that many people will have more than one type of dizziness. Which sounds like you.

It is common to see a person with vertigo from post-viral infection and ALSO from anxiety -- because vertigo makes them anxious -- so they have a combination of 2 types of dizziness. Or, they are dizzy because of near-fainting episodes because, for example, one doctor has put them on medications that cause dizziness, and this has made them anxious. A patient could have all four types of dizziness, but that would be REALLY rare.

Now the good news my dear I promise you, is that nearly everybody who is dizzy, WILL get better. This is because a person's sense of balance is a complex interaction between the brain, each ear's separate vestibular system, and the sense of vision. When one component breaks down, the others usually learn to compensate.
There is not a major chance of permanent dizziness. All the best experts now feel that there is no reason why the nervous system can't compensate for a broken vestibular system. People with vestibular problems due to physical "injury" (i.e. a real anatomical and physical change) nearly always compensate. So if you can't compensate when there is no physical injury, it means a problem of mental or emotional origin.

So, hang on kiddo...I'm sure the doctors will identify what's going on for sure and you'll soon be on the way to feeling much better. Try not to let the fear take over...This is not forever.

zuzu xx
[QUOTE=zuzu8]Hi willsmom-
Yes, I indeed avoided a lot of things...walking made me feel frightened..Simply going out anywhere did. Like you, I looked great and it was hard for my friends to understand how lousy I felt. I never actually has brief "dizzy spells".I just felt unsteady, lightheaded, un-grounded, 'floaty" all the time. But no true "vertigo" which I will get to in a moment. I am not familiar with the term "post-urography test", sorry, but I failed the test where you are standing, then fold your arms, put heel to toe and then CLOSE YOUR EYES. I toppled over every time. I can't remember if I felt worse in the dark...I think so.
Now, here's what I know about dizziness...it may be more information than you'll ever need but I hope by the time this post ends you'll feel somewhat reassured.

Dizziness is a very rich problem because it contains pieces of internal medicine, a lot of neurology, a lot of otolaryngology [ear, nose, and throat medicine], and a lot of psychiatry.
By now your doctor has probably figured out which kind of "dizziness" you are experiencing. There are four distinct types: vertigo, lightheadedness, disequilibrium, and anxiety.

Type 1 -- VERTIGO

Vertigo is the feeling of motion when there is no motion.

It's a feeling common to every child who's spun himself around and around. But if it happens in the course of normal daily living, it is a symptom, one that accounts for about half of all "dizzy" complaints.

Vertigo means there is a problem with the vestibular system of the inner ear -- the part of the nervous system that tells you which way is down (the sense of gravity), and also lets you sense the position of your head.
There are two very common causes of vertigo:
Infectious agents, such as the viruses that cause the common cold or diarrhea.This harmless condition usually goes away by itself within 6-8 weeks, although drugs are available if it is severe.
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo or BPPV. This is another harmless condition caused by movement of a calcium particle in the inner ear the size of a grain of sand -- from the part of the ear that senses gravity to the part that senses head position.You feel as if your head is turning when it isn't. A two-minute therapy done right in the doctor's office can move this particle ( called the otolith) back where it belongs and fix the problem.


Another cause of vertigo is Meniere's disease, a disorder characterized by long-lasting episodes of severe vertigo. Usually there are episodes of nausea and vomiting as well.
Other typical symptoms of Meniere's disease are tinnitus -- a roaring and obnoxious buzzing, ringing or other noises in the ear. Also a feeling of pressure or fullness in the ear. My stepmother had Meniere's and it is very treatable, once diagnosed properly.

By the way, you said something very interesting. You used the word "BOUNCING".
This is a classic symptom of something called DANDY'S SYNDROME.

Dandy's syndrome is when everything bounces up and down.One of the causes of Dandy's is from taking certain antibiotics that are toxic for the ears. Had you taken any antibiotics before this all started? The world bounces up and down and sometimes all you can do is put your head against a building and hold on. Even a heartbeat will can make the world jump.

THE GOOD NEWS IS that Dandy's syndrome usually improves and disappears over time.

Regarding vertigo in general, people with vertigo from a truly serious cause (now pay attention here! This is meant to reassure you!) also have other symptoms, the most important of which are double vision and slurred speech. It would be VERY UNCOMMON to have only vertigo and to have a very serious [central nervous system] disease.

Then we have the second type of dizziness --Type 2- LIGHTHEADEDNESS. ...which is basically the feeling that one is about to faint.

Like vertigo, everyone knows what this feels like because we all know what it's like to breathe deeply enough times to produce a sensation of lightheadedness. Usually, lightheadedness is caused by some surrounding circumstance impairing blood flow to the brain when a person is standing up.

Blame this problem on our ancestors who learned to walk upright -- putting our brain above our heart. It's a challenge for the heart to keep the brain supplied with blood -- and it's easy for this system to break down.

When blood vessels in the brain become dilated, or expand, due to high temperature, excitement or hyperventilation, alcohol consumption, or prescription medications such as antidepressants, a person can become lightheaded.

Most of the time, lightheadedness is harmless. It becomes more of a concern if it occurs in an older person, in a person not on suspect drugs, or if it happens while exercising.

The next type of dizziness.. Type 3- DISEQUILIBRIUM ...creates a problem with walking. People feel unsteady on their feet, like they are going to fall.

Disorders that can cause disequilibrium include:

A kind of arthritis in the neck called cervical spondylosis, which puts pressure on the spinal cord.
Parkinson's disease, or related disorders that cause a person to stoop forward.
Disorders involving a part of the brain called the cerebellum.
Diseases such as diabetes (when the diabetic develops neuropathy (loss of sensation) in their legs. This is not you obviously or you would certainly have told us!!
Disequilibrium is diagnosed when your doc conducts a simple neurological exam and watches you walk.

Then there's the all-inclusive nightmare--Type 4- ANXIETY

People who are scared, worried, depressed, or agoraphobic [afraid of open spaces]sometimes use the word dizzy to mean frightened, depressed, or anxious.

There's a fascinating "test" that very savvy doctors use to recognize this type of dizziness. They take the word 'dizzy' out of all the patient's sentences and replace it with the word 'anxious", "scared" or "depressed"...and the sentences suddenly make a lot more sense! This doesn't mean the dizziness isn't very real and experienced as one or MORE of the 4 "types".

But this leads me now to what they call MIXED-TYPE DIZZINESS:
This means that many people will have more than one type of dizziness. Which sounds like you.

It is common to see a person with vertigo from post-viral infection and ALSO from anxiety -- because vertigo makes them anxious -- so they have a combination of 2 types of dizziness. Or, they are dizzy because of near-fainting episodes because, for example, one doctor has put them on medications that cause dizziness, and this has made them anxious. A patient could have all four types of dizziness, but that would be REALLY rare.

Now the good news my dear I promise you, is that nearly everybody who is dizzy, WILL get better. This is because a person's sense of balance is a complex interaction between the brain, each ear's separate vestibular system, and the sense of vision. When one component breaks down, the others usually learn to compensate.
There is not a major chance of permanent dizziness. All the best experts now feel that there is no reason why the nervous system can't compensate for a broken vestibular system. People with vestibular problems due to physical "injury" (i.e. a real anatomical and physical change) nearly always compensate. So if you can't compensate when there is no physical injury, it means a problem of mental or emotional origin.

So, hang on kiddo...I'm sure the doctors will identify what's going on for sure and you'll soon be on the way to feeling much better. Try not to let the fear take over...This is not forever.

zuzu xx[/QUOTE]

Hey ZuZu,

Once again your reply is superb! I think you are so right i have two types of dizzyness the first form the vestibular problem and the second the anxiety.

They all tell me I will get better and you have so that lifts my spirits greatly!!

All that you describe is how I feel! Oh and the bouncy thing - its more me thats bouncy and off its like an extreme of the off balance feelings.

Nope I dont spin as such either........BUT I do have a strange sensation of movement if I stand stock still on the ground .......did you? All i do know for sure is the more I fear it the worse I get.

How did you get out and about and not just freak out? Did you have to force yourself?

I have brief spells of being dizzy - not movement - but plain dizzy in the head occasionally - dail I guess - short and transinet.

But the biggie for me is the imbalance - ick - I am not kidding you I feel off balance and unsteady. Also when it gets so bad with the bouncing I fee a sudden faint feeling - could be anxiety? I am not sure.

Can I ask you say felt imbalance etc but ine kind of vary I cannot tell if I am gonna feel fine, not right, really off or what day to day. Can u relate?

I soooooooooo appreciate your effort.

Ilia
[QUOTE=willsmom][QUOTE=zuzu8]FUZ- When I was in my mid-thirties, I went through a couple of years of feeling lightheaded, "dizzy-ish", just weird.
I felt not "grounded", unsteady, even though my gait was perfect. I always felt "tippy", like I MIGHT lose my balance, but never did.
One of the best descriptions I could come up with was a feeling of "sea-legs", as if I'd just stepped off a boat. The earth seemed to be moving underneath me inappropriately.
Regular doc ran a battery of tests, all bloods and urine normal. Neurologist gave me a thorough work-up and found all systems A-Okay.
I had a brain scan and tomographies of my inner ear...eveything normal.
The sensations alone made me fearful and anxious and exacerbated everything.
It was a vicious cycle. The sensations lead to fear which lead to more feelings of "tippiness" which lead to even more anxiety and on and on.

Low doses of tranquillizers helped and I also saw a therapist for a while who helped calm me enormously, because by this time I was sure I had some occult disease that everyone had missed. Along the way, I discovered I had some pretty important issues in my life that I was avoiding which I really hadn't been aware of.

PLEASE REPLY!!!!!!

Oh my lord,

This is what is wrong with me!! its so frightening! may I ask did you actually feel like your balance was off and like to steady yourself. I get that same the ground is moving thing too under my feet - its so scary!! I can get myself all into a state and I am at the stage where I dont want to go out incase it gets worse. I have also had this vile feeling that i am going to pass ot but never do. Like you I am so SCARED of the symptoms I am in a vicious cycle too. i am seeing a neuro this month and am praying for some answers. i have had an mri which is fine. I have had a posturograph tests too which shows that my balance is not normal for my age and indicates some inner ear issue. But its weird my symptoms are there 24/7 were yours? and did you find that they vary in intensity? how did you feel if you stood still? could you feel movement?So funny bout the occult disease that is sooooo where I am at with this deal. Did it make you nervous to walk and all? its funny I look perfect but feel like hell.
My life feels like one massive - I cannot do that ot go out or function as I feel so strange!!!!!!!

Thanks!![/QUOTE]





Well I hope u visit this.. Did u all get any answers yet.. if so I need some thanx alison





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