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Foot & Ankle Problems Message Board


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Hi Delightfuldior, so glad to hear a reply as a new member myself! It does encourages me a lot to have such on-line community support during these tough weeks :)
Your photos are looking good, I have to say, you're definitely on the road to full recovery, and your toes look straight and nice. I really believe it is just a matter of time for you to get the full bounds back in shy of weeks. I think once the final swelling has gone, your toe will look all good, don't worry.

For me, as much as the operation was simpler, but my scar (which is similar to yours in length) is sitting vertical just below the big toe into the middle part of the foot, and a nail is inserted towards the end of the scar to secure the new adjusted bone. So, much like Jesus was nailed on the Cross (you can picture that). My surgoen used the best and most simple method to correct my bunion and this is the result. So far, I am happy with my recovery. The worse post op pain is much passed, I am trying to come off painkillers totally now (day & night). I'm trying to do minimal foot moving execrsies (moving foot back & forth a bit), and draw circles in the air by moving the foot etc. This is my R foot so I'm pretty dependent on my L foot since last week's operation. My concern now is the L foot also has a big bunion and it's just a matter of another year or 2 (the latest) to fix that one too. My surgeon strongly adviced me to do 1 foot at a time so to be 'slightly' moblie during recovery - I totally agreed, 1 foot at a time.

Did you have an operation too for your R foot? Or does that foot bothers you?

Do you have any suggestions as to scar managment after the wound is closed? Did you use any creams or oils to smooth out the scar?

How did you come about getting bunions? I got me pretty much inherited from my dad, he has big ones, but got away with surgery. Then, when I was living in England, I took up classical ballet for 6 to 7 years, so that kind of stressed out my toes (which are already quite easy to get bunions). I worked at Hotel Front Desk for a couple of years in my 20's and they needed us to stand a lot at the job with slight heels, again, that hurt my feet...
Lastly, when I got pregrant at 27 with my daughter, the weight of child bearing also contributed to the on-set of bunions. So, as I hit 43 now after so many elements in the past, my foot have been finally acting up and my bunions got bigger gradually each year since 6 or 7 years ago. I have put it off to operate on it until I am sure about this. I have heard some terriable stories. However, my love of outdoor walks, and nature seem to disappear on me. I no longer can go hiking for 3 years. I also cannot talk long summer walks which I love or jog too long, my feet just cannot bear it. So, my life quality is going downhill and I cannot be active like I want to be. I told my husband and surgeon that I am only 43, I still to live and love life, as much as I hate to go under the knife and the scar(s) will be there for years,but I want to able to talk walks and live a healthy life. So, after a year of seeing this foot specialist referred by my doctor, I went for her for the surgery last week. Yes, it has been a decision which I took long time to make.

Yes, I have been told my surgeon that the 1st 2 to 3 weeks are the toughest to get through as I love to be out for walks, doing my hobbies (in door plants, making soaps, and outdoor walks and social with people)....but these weeks WILL pass, she said, and it WILL get better. I have been trying my best to keep busy (like replying emails, joined a forum like this one, reading, phoning friends) so not to have the on-set of depression, which will make things worse. I am a Christian and go to church regularly. I missed church last Sunday due to my freshly operated foot. I hope I can use my crutches to attend church tomorrow (Sun). To see my friends and to join the worship, it really help emotionally to be attached with my Faith during healing time. Many at this forum have shared about this too.

My work place is not as generous. They only approved 4 weeks so far for my sick leave (which ends on April 17). However, it it so unrealistic to be back on my feet to work only 4 weeks, my surgeon is going to fill in documents closer to the 4th week to push to end of April or at least early May to give me 6 to 7 weeks. Really, the companies nowadays are tough and full sick leave pay is getting harder to be approved. We will see how things go. That is why I am hoping, praying, and longing for my R foot to recover in a speed fast way - really, it is not a want, it is a need for me, for my job.
My job is an admin job at the hotel (I no longer have to work at the Front Desk now), but needs me to walk around to get documents, printings, distributions, and communications to different departments, and the hotel is a larger hotel too, so lots of walking. I hope my company's insurance provider can understand this nature. As soon as they see it is an admin job, they are set to limit the weeks off and have their lots of reasons to back them up. Me too have my reasons too, and my surgeon also insists this way that I need over 4 weeks off. So I hope you will push it for me. Will keep you posted.

Do you have to work at all?

It is a beautiful Saturday morning here in Vancouver. But, I can't go out for a morning walk :(
My hubby just returned from his morning walk and told me how nice it is outside. Early Spring is setting in here in Vancouver.

I have been to Wakefield before (long time ago..). It is a town famous for steel making. When I was a teenager in Leeds, my Boarding School led us as a class to travel to Wakefield for a day trip to look at the steel production sites. It was a lot of fun. I missed my England days, those were the good young student days I had whenever I looked back now! Just wonderful!

Hope to hear from you soon. :)



[QUOTE=delightfuldior;4715708]Hi, Im in Wakefield west yorks, not far from Leeds :)

Itll be 8 weeks on Monday since my op. I had the xrays done on Monday and all is well. I noticed though that there were two screws in the first metatarsal and a staple in the big toe. No pins. I thought a scarf oseotomy involved putting the screws in the joint. Not the metatarsal.

Anyhow, I am fully weight bearing. Foot is still very swollen, if not more now Im walking on it. I can only fit my ugg boots on but its very painful getting them off once Ive swollen into it! I dont have full movement of my big toe and cant stand on my tip toes but Im gently and slowly pushing it. Im hoping to go to a pool and do some treading to give it some exercise.

The incision has taken some healing. It was still open at 7 weeks. Its also very lumpy and red so Ive had to protect it with a dressing till it eases off. Im still in the flat velcro shoe when not in the uggs.

I hope you recover well. I have to agree, its the test of being housebound and not able to do anything. This was the worst for me. I could take my dogs out, drive - which I am still not able to do, housework etc. It was horrible :( Ive been told I cannot run for 3 months and this I love. So its the gym bike and cross trainer for me! I forgot to ask about heels. I guess thatll be something like 3 months too although I rarely wear them unless I go out.

Ive attched some pics. You will see the gap between the big and 2nd toe has closed up alot and unless Im imagining it, the big toe has turned in again? But thre is alot of swelling too so maybe it will look better then.[/QUOTE]
Hi Polly (hope you don't mind me addressing you as Polly, more personable) ;)

My 2nd visit to my foot doctor (who is the also the one who performs on my surgery) is tomorrow late afternoon. My hubby will come home a bit earlier and drives me to see her. Her clinic is about 20 minutes by highway from my home at the other end of the town. Which is not too bad for distance-wise.

Hubby has been wonderful and loving to me. He took some days off to care for me right after the surgery. My 15 years old daughter has also been at home the past week as her mid term break, so I was lucky to time my surgery this way. Starting tomorrow, I'll be on my own at home during the week as hubby is at work and my daughter will be back to school after mid-term break. I'll have lots of time reading, resting, writing emails, chatting on this newly joined forum, and researching on many other things I have never had time to do 'sitting down'. I have always work full time since I moved to Canada from Hong Kong 20 years ago as a young lady, so apart frommy maternity leave for my daugther's birth back in 1995 for 6 months, I have always work my butt off hard :dizzy:

It is so nice you can hoovering! Woo! I long to get back on my feet soon. My home is a bit messy now as I have been 'ingoring' the mess due to my 1st week post-op. I have hoping this is into my 2nd week, things can be healing more as the days progress. I long to be able to do my own laundry, hoovering, cook my own little meals and able to just to be 'moblie' enough to eventually walk a little outside by a cane or so and sit at the courtyard outside of our apartment. The Spring has really sets in for Vancouver and the weather can be sunny and nice some days, with occasional rain. The past few days have been beautiful with the early Spring feel. I really wish I could be well enough to sit outdoors even just for a little bit.

The swelling at my foot is going down a lot, I could tell, compares to last week post-op. I have trying to move my foot in a front and back motion and draw circles in the air with it when lying in bed for sitting with my foot up. I hope tomorrow the doc can give me good news as to the removal of stitches and if miracle happens, she can also remove the pin. Otherwise, everything should be able to be removed by 3rd week (early April).

I only had 1 penny size bleeding post op, but otherwise everything looks good to my doc during my last visit 5 days post-op.

You know Polly, I have been trying to keep very positive, staying sociable to talk to friends over the phone, and let them come to my home for visits so to keep my spirit up and to avoid depression. I had a mild post-patrum depression for about 3 weeks after I gave birth to my daughter. I was a bit worried that this operation my trigger this kind of depression again.

For the last week, I did have my 'blue' days on and off, and slowly I am getting better. I guessed this blue is very normal from reading off the forum.

I only used my velco 'moon boot' when I have to go out for doc visits or go to church (yes I am a faithful Christian and going to church really helps me during this recovery time. My pastor said a little prayer for my foot for speedy healing).... as my foot is bundled up with thicker bandage - it is a bit tight to fit into the boot. I can velco it loosely but still love to let my foot breath at home when I am taking it easy.

My job is 'watching' me tightly for my sick leave - as my company's insurance is covering my sick leave so far. They approved 4 weeks so far. Any further sick leave my doc will have to fill out more medical forms, which I know my doc will push for me. She knows well that it is best to try for more than 4 weeks if it works. She is trying to push to 6 weeks off for me. That is why I really pray that my healing can be speedy!

From yesterday, my foot started to itch at the bottom. May be due to the bundled up for the past 10 days. I hope this is also a sign of recovery. I no longer need to ice the foot that much nowadays compares to the 1st post op week. Just very occasionally if I had my foot down for longer down than expected.

I love the description of where you live - a livery yard! This is the kind of life of my dream. You must live at the country side of the town? I live at North Vancouver which is the other side of downtown Vancouver.

I remember you also lives near Yorkshire?? I went to a Boarding School in West Yorkshire, near Leeds area. I was there as a Boarder for almost 9 years. Those were to good innocent years, I was only a teenager studying my O & A levels !! I still love some of the photos I kept from my school days there. I really missed England that way. I always tell my family and friends about the Yorkshire & my lovely boarding school days.

Take care. Hubby is putting on a simple late dinner - it is 8:30pm our time in Vancouver. As tomorrow is a work day for him (and a school day for my daughter), we will be going to bed prior to 10:00pm.

Chat to you after the doc visit tomorrow to see how things go :)

Thanks for all the support on-line :angel:

Hotdog girl.


[QUOTE=polly54;4716497]Hi Hotdog girl, what a tremendous suprise to get a reply from you- and all the way from Canada too. I'm afraid I had to have a day more or less in bed after doing far too much the day before. I felt that I had really cracked this recovery business and was practically skipping about in my snazzy (not) velcro sandals; painting, sewing, hoovering, cooking and on more than one occasion forgetting about my feet- which was rather nice. I even went with my husband, who drove, to our livery yard where I tottered about amongst the horses and filled the odd hay net. Yesterday however I felt exhausted and realised that I had been pushing it so I spent the day mostly sleeping and sitting with feet up. Feel better for it today and again having to resist the temptation to rush at everything.
I really have had very little pain or swelling in either foot (with minimal medication) and I put this down to the minimally invasive technique that is being trial'd here and apparently has been given NICE approval as the procedure of choice. I recall the consultant said that there have only been a total of 600 cases to have the procedure-not sure if that was in UK only so I suppose I have been a bit of a guinea pig.It was done on the NHS. It involved a general anaesthetic, 2x 2 cm cuts above and below the bunion, a metal pin attached by 3 screws to the bone, chevron cut in 2 places to allow for the straightening and no stitching. A tournacay (realise that's wrong spelling)had been used to stem blood flow during the op. Then my feet were thickly and quite tightly bandaged and i'm pleased to say didn't bleed post-op and I was given the velcrO sandal which i soon got the hang of. The op took about an hour and I came home about 5 hours later.
The recovery period so far has really been fine and as I said I have had to keep reminding myself what I have had done and the need to take it steadily.
Tomorrow I am due back at the clinic to have the dressings off and hopefully to move into thick padded socks and soft shoes or to have another dressing on. i presume i will have feet x-rayed to look at progress.
In some respects I feel i will be more vulnerable to damaging myself when back in normal shoes (I have a couple of pairs of washable Ugg type boots in the washer as we speak) and inclined to fly around again. Can't risk stubbing my foot/feet and will need to ask tomorrow about how much i can do and what would be the (worst) consequences of bumping feet. Suppose most of it will be guided by the amount of pain. I am hoping that I am ok by the 6 weeks mark -as far as driving, dog walking and riding are concerned but expect to be signed off sick leave in a weeks time. My work is office based and sedentary so I should be ok and have warned colleagues that I might need to adopt the feet on desk position for a few weeks. I think I will feel better when i am back in routine and 'out there'.
I inherited my bunions from my Mother; all her sibs and my maternal cousins have strange feet, but not necessarily bunions. My Mother had hers done40 years ago- big cuts/ scars and done separately so legs in pots for well over a year. The pain was described as worse than childbirth, so I was well put off. Then over the last few years, despite always wearing flat, wide shoes (EEE) and keeping fit I have been beset by painful swollen and very limiting feet, especially in summer. I had gone to see GP about something else but when asked about why i was limping, ended up in tears and so came to realise the extent to which i had been putting on a brave face. The process from referral to being seen took about 4 months which i feel is excellent. After seeing the nurse tomorrow i am booked in to see the surgeon on 12/5 when i hope i will be fit for discharge.

So I am very pleased with it all so far but might be less clever tomorrow pm after seeing my new feet for the first time. I will take pictures though and attempt to attach them to FB and would be interested in your verdict. Whether i will get the swelling after the fairly restrictive dressings come off remains to be seen but I always have my super velcros to fall back on (pun not intended)
Anyway need to stand up so will close and wish you a continued good recovery.

Keep smiling. We have the summer, just around the corner, to enjoy our new feet (or foot in your case). x[/QUOTE]
Hi Delightfuldior, thanks for your reply! It is always nice to hear from people from the other side of the world of their bunion healing experience. Such good emotional support - as I am still kind of on my 11 days post-op, slowly making my way to the 2 weeks post-op mark! :)

My foot is feeling more of itself now. Once in a while I have some numb feelings, and little pin like sensations. Not a huge deal but I am feeling them more this past few days. The swelling has gone done a lot than the past week. A little bit left per my eyes can see (my toes are sticking out from the bandage so I can always check on my toes)

My bunions got bothersome when I was in my early to mid 30's. Back then, I did think of surgery but my family doctor encouraged me to wait out a few more years, as he fore-warned me it is a serious surgery and I do have to be ready for it. He was right. So for the following years, I tried everything on the face of this earth to prolong the deformation of the bunions. I got good professional medical insoles for my soft walking shoes, taking care of my tired feet at the end of the day by having massages and foot soaks, I also cut back in a few pounds (I have always been in the 125 to 131 lbs range, so I am keeping it to 128 for years - trying to loose a bit more & hope to return to 125 to 126 pounds. Using the crutches and canes have been a work out in itself....

However, after 10 years now, I cannot get away from the reality that my bunions are starting to hurt and bother me more, almost on a regular basis. So, I returned to my doc and he referred me to this currently lovely lady surgeon. She is very experienced in sport injury and is a foot specialist. I have been seeing her monthly since April 2010 and we all came to this decision to have one foot done for surgery while I am still in my early 40's and can get back the quality of life. I love nature walks, light jogging and all kinds of leisure walks. I am not huge on heavy duty long distrance cross training or marathons so I am not asking a lot out of my feet. Just to be able to get outdoors and may be go on some hikings (Vancouver has a lot of lovely trails). Really, that is all I ask of my feet - to be healthy.

In regards to the surgical method. Orginally my surgeon was thinking of using a little screw to permanently bind my newly adjusted big toe bones. However, she knows that my bones are of more 'slim' bulit, so she decided to use a thin nail (or pin) and let it sticks out for a bit post op, but will be removed eventually so I have no metal inside me. She does not want to trauma my foot more than necessary (as the bunion surgery is already a lot to bear for many women) so she wants to go easy on me. For the scar, I have a bottle of Bio oil at home. I also have some organic extra virgin olive oil with some coco butter and herbs at home. I can melt some of these goodies together and gently put it on the scar once the hardware are out and the wound is closed. But not massaging it too much yet, as one of my friend who is a herbist told me the scar tissue underneath the top layer still needs time to bind even when the top layer of the wound is closed up. So, be patient and let the skin takes time to bind properly, like the bit toe bones.


Well, I took a quick look at my 5 days post op foot later when I visited my surgeon last week for my 1st postop visit. I almost 'passed out' when I took a quick look at my foot - as I have not seen my foot to be so bundled up, with the stitches and pin. I comforted myself it is just a matter of getting use to see an operated foot, I guessed. I have never had any surgery in my 43 years of life, so this bunion thing has been a big thing for me. To be brave emotionally, and to weight out what is important in life - a foot with some scars (which will fade in time) or a foot (or feet) with endless pain and eventually overlapping toes and limited mobilty. I decided to go with the former and have some scars of 'character and courage' - courage to make a change in life. I almost cried with joy to see how straight my big toe is 1st time in more than 20 years! My surgeon let me have a quick few seconds' glance of my newly straightened toe right after operation, for encouragement. I was kind of half awake from the pain killer. I had a local anthestia at my foot only, not a general.

By the way, I have read up a lot materials and took a course in herbal healing and natural soap making years ago. I have learned that organic extra virgin olive oil, calendula oil, lavender essential oil, organic natural shea butter, coco butter, rose hip oil, and chickweed herb are all good for scar healing. I have them all ready at home now. I purchased a jar of chickweed cream (since this is the only thing I do not have at home), very gentle (made of infusion of chickweed which natura olive oil). I am going to try the chickweed cream soon after the doc gives me the ok for the wound healing. Then I'll go with the olive oil and try the Bio oil eventually.

One thing I have working very hard during this 2 weeks post-op (which is the most awful period of time per everyone I have talked to in person and from this forum) is that to avoid the on-set of depression. As I have shared I went through depression after giving birth to my baby daugther 15 years old for a whole month. It was one of the awful experience I had. I was glad I had the 6 months maternity leave here in Canada back in the 90's. So I was able to kick it off and be a happy mom by the time I returned to work. From 1998 onwards, Canada even extended maternity leave to be a full 12 months, with 60% pay from Govt. I almost kicked myself for not having a 2nd baby to make full use of this govt benefit. However, life goes on & my daughter is a young lady of 15 now. She will celebrate her sweet 16 on May 20 this year, just a couple of month away! It is also that I know my daughter is grown and hubby is still not ready to retired :) so I decided to get 1 foot done now. At least I have 1 good R foot for the future. I have been telling myself this is a learning experience for this entire bunion operation and post-op healing. As what I am learning now will be really helping for my next L foot surgery (which is inevitable as that bunion is big too. By that time in a few years, I will be a bit older (may take longer to heal due to age and my bunion may be even bigger then) but again, it will be the L foot so at least it won't be my domniant foot.

It took me a while to decide which foot to operate on, as the R foot has a 'slightly' smaller bunion, but hurts my nerves more as it is my dominant side. The L has a bigger bunion but hurts me a little bit less - so after debating with myself for months - my R foot first, it would be.

My younger sister also have bunions on both of her feet. She just turned 40 with 2 young kids. However, hers have never bothered her feet like mine. She is also a bigger bulit girl. I was told by my foot surgeon that may be I have slimmer bones, so the bunions show more and I feel them more on my feet compares to my sister - :(

My dad passed away 10 years ago at age 65. He also have identical bunion feet like my sister. He also got away with surgery for his feet.

For shoes, I have not buy any new soft shoes yet as I am not even sure if my shoe size will change after this operation. So I am sticking with my current walking shoes (soft stretchy material) with my special insoles in them for support. These shoes have been working hard for me all of the past year since my foot started to hurt bad. They are a bit worn out so once my foot healed, I'm going to look around to invest in another pair of good walking shoes to replace them and keep on using my professionally made support insoles with the new shoes. Good quality shoes can be expensive here in Canada. I have to say, I am not thinking about heals for years to come, as my L foot still need to be watched out for the bunion. So, the only heals I have are my winter leather boots which is not really 'high healed', just a bit higher than my other flats.

I will keep you posted of my updates after the 2nd visit to my foot doc later today. Hope to bring you good news of progress.



[QUOTE=delightfuldior;4717166]hello all ;)

My bunions are inherited from Mums side. And my Mum is in surgery having her left bunion done and toes straightening as I type! Hers are terrible, she is 51. I am 33 and had them as far back as 10 year old! I used to hate PE and wore long baggy bottoms to cover them. I didnt make them any better by wearing high heels with pointy toes from about 21 but they have kinda got worse in the last 4 years and Ive been wearing mainly flats! I will be getting the right one done in a couple of years as it looks so distinctive now against the new foot. It wasnt that bad as you see in the pic but since the op its got bigger and more painfull as I have been over compensating on that foot.

I came off the meds about week two. I got tummy upset and rash with the anti inflams and the tramadol made me feel sick so I weaned myself off them and took paracetamol every 4 hours eventually winding down off these. I found the first two weeks horrific. I had a hlaf cast on bound tightly by ace bandages and when the foot swelled it burnt like mad :(. Once the cast was off it felt much better but I could still feel the swelling; mainly around the tom of the foot near the toes; which I still get.

I drove my car for the first time yesterday. It was painful to use the clutch and also difficult as my velcro shoe kept getting caught under the break, so I wouldnt say I am fit for driving unless I wear my uggs. I have tried to get some cons on and gym shoes but cannot pull them on because the incision really hurts :( its starting to heal nice but the skin is very hard in areas where the metal work is underneath and its numb but stings.. if that makes sense.

Ive been gently massaging bio oil in twice a day since Saturday. I have used this before for another op I had and the scars are barely noticable.

I previously went to see about having my bunions done in 04. The consultant told me I too would have a pin/screw sticking out my foot for a while... this put me off and I refused to have it done. :( So I praise you for going ahead!!!!! You must have guts to have the procedure done this way. Who knows when I come to get the other done I may see a diff consultant and have it done this way!

I have been off work for 8 weeks. 4 weeks full pay and 4 weeks half pay by my employer. I go back tomorrow on a phased return to work basis starting from office duties 25% of my hours, building up to 100% over 4 weeks. I will then return to my normal duties of driving and working between sites on shifts. My employer has been great. I was told that I would only be off 4 week but at the 2 week check up I was told to return in 5. I was gutted :(

I suffer from anxiety and depression anyhow so 7 weeks of nothing to do drove me up the wall. But by week 4 I was up and about shuffling in my heel bearing shoe and was able to get into the garden, walk around the block with the dogs and do housework which lifted my spirits.

Next time I will prepare more now I know what to expect. Maybe buy an online course to do whilst off work, arrange for the dogs to be walked every day etc. Them not getting walked made me sad alone as they love their two walks a day. Now they are back full swing now I can take them :D I had to freeze my gym membership for three months. I go back on 1st May of which I will have some PT sessions for a month and then Im on my own. I'll be doing bike and stepper and x trainer eventually as running is out of the question. I'm going to visit a runners shop this week and get my foot checked and some ideas on shock absorbing trainers for when I eventually start running.

Its a massive operation getting ya bunion done. some people cannot beleive how complicated the op is. It tests ya mental health to the limit!! But if all goes well.. its worth it :D[/QUOTE]
Hi Polly, as I am a newbee at this forum, I just replied to another lady from UK 'delightfuldior' for my reply. I am not sure if you too can see my reply to her. So, I decided to send you this same reply with my updates - don't want you to feel left out on our chatty forum :)
I'll keep you posted once I am done with my 2nd post-op visit later this afternoon : Hugs!

Hello All, Nice to hear from the other side of the world of their bunion healing experiences. Such good emotional support - as I am still kind of on my 11 days post-op, slowly making my way to the 2 weeks post-op mark! :)

My foot is feeling more of itself now. Once in a while I have some numb feelings, and little pin like sensations. Not a huge deal but I am feeling them more this past few days. The swelling has gone done a lot than the past week. A little bit left per my eyes can see (my toes are sticking out from the bandage so I can always check on my toes):)

My bunions got bothersome when I was in my early to mid 30's. Back then, I did think of surgery but my family doctor encouraged me to wait out a few more years, as he fore-warned me it is a serious surgery and I do have to be ready for it. He was right. So for the following years, I tried everything on the face of this earth to prolong the deformation of the bunions. I got good professional medical insoles for my soft walking shoes, taking care of my tired feet at the end of the day by having massages and foot soaks, I also cut back in a few pounds (I have always been in the 125 to 131 lbs range, so I am keeping it to 128 for years - trying to loose a bit more & hope to return to 125 to 126 pounds :)
Using the crutches and canes have been a work out in itself....

However, after 10 years now, I cannot get away from the reality that my bunions are starting to hurt and bother me more, almost on a regular basis. So, I returned to my doc and he referred me to this currently lovely lady surgeon. She is very experienced in sport injury and is a foot specialist. I have been seeing her monthly since April 2010 and we all came to this decision to have one foot done for surgery while I am still in my early 40's and can get back the quality of life. I love nature walks, light jogging and all kinds of leisure walks. I am not huge on heavy duty long distrance cross training or marathons so I am not asking a lot out of my feet. Just to be able to get outdoors and may be go on some hikings (Vancouver has a lot of lovely trails). Really, that is all I ask of my feet - to be healthy.

In regards to the surgical method. Orginally my surgeon was thinking of using a little screw to permanently bind my newly adjusted big toe bones. However, she knows that my bones are of more 'slim' bulit, so she decided to use a thin nail (or pin) and let it sticks out for a bit post op, but will be removed eventually so I have no metal inside me. She does not want to trauma my foot more than necessary (as the bunion surgery is already a lot to bear for many women) so she wants to go easy on me. For the scar, I have a bottle of Bio oil at home. I also have some organic extra virgin olive oil with some coco butter and herbs at home. I can melt some of these goodies together and gently put it on the scar once the hardware are out and the wound is closed. But not massaging it too much yet, as one of my friend who is a herbist told me the scar tissue underneath the top layer still needs time to bind even when the top layer of the wound is closed up. So, be patient and let the skin takes time to bind properly, like the bit toe bones.

Well, I took a quick look at my 5 days post op foot later when I visited my surgeon last week for my 1st postop visit. I almost 'passed out' when I took a quick look at my foot - as I have not seen my foot to be so bundled up, with the stitches and pin. I comforted myself it is just a matter of getting use to see an operated foot, I guessed. I have never had any surgery in my 43 years of life, so this bunion thing has been a big thing for me. To be brave emotionally, and to weight out what is important in life - a foot with some scars (which will fade in time) or a foot (or feet) with endless pain and eventually overlapping toes and limited mobilty. I decided to go with the former and have some scars of 'character and courage' - courage to make a change in life. I almost cried with joy to see how straight my big toe is 1st time in more than 20 years! My surgeon let me have a quick few seconds' glance of my newly straightened toe right after operation, for encouragement. I was kind of half awake from the pain killer. I had a local anthestia at my foot only, not a general.

By the way, I have read up a lot materials and took a course in herbal healing and natural soap making years ago. I have learned that organic extra virgin olive oil, calendula oil, lavender essential oil, organic natural shea butter, coco butter, rose hip oil, and chickweed herb are all good for scar healing. I have them all ready at home now. I purchased a jar of chickweed cream (since this is the only thing I do not have at home), very gentle (made of infusion of chickweed which natura olive oil). I am going to try the chickweed cream soon after the doc gives me the ok for the wound healing. Then I'll go with the olive oil and try the Bio oil eventually.

One thing I have working very hard during this 2 weeks post-op (which is the most awful period of time per everyone I have talked to in person and from this forum) is that to avoid the on-set of depression. As I have shared I went through depression after giving birth to my baby daugther 15 years old for a whole month. It was one of the awful experience I had. I was glad I had the 6 months maternity leave here in Canada back in the 90's. So I was able to kick it off and be a happy mom by the time I returned to work. From 1998 onwards, Canada even extended maternity leave to be a full 12 months, with 60% pay from Govt. I almost kicked myself for not having a 2nd baby to make full use of this govt benefit. However, life goes on & my daughter is a young lady of 15 now. She will celebrate her sweet 16 on May 20 this year, just a couple of month away! It is also that I know my daughter is grown and hubby is still not ready to retired :) so I decided to get 1 foot done now. At least I have 1 good R foot for the future. I have been telling myself this is a learning experience for this entire bunion operation and post-op healing. As what I am learning now will be really helping for my next L foot surgery (which is inevitable as that bunion is big too....:confused:). By that time in a few years, I will be a bit older (may take longer to heal due to age and my bunion may be even bigger then) but again, it will be the L foot so at least it won't be my domniant foot.

It took me a while to decide which foot to operate on, as the R foot has a 'slightly' smaller bunion, but hurts my nerves more as it is my dominant side. The L has a bigger bunion but hurts me a little bit less - so after debating with myself for months - my R foot first, it would be:)

My younger sister also have bunions on both of her feet. She just turned 40 with 2 young kids. However, hers have never bothered her feet like mine. She is also a bigger bulit girl. I was told by my foot surgeon that may be I have slimmer bones, so the bunions show more and I feel them more on my feet compares to my sister - :(

My dad passed away 10 years ago at age 65. He also have identical bunion feet like my sister. He also got away with surgery for his feet.

For shoes, I have not buy any new soft shoes yet as I am not even sure if my shoe size will change after this operation. So I am sticking with my current walking shoes (soft stretchy material) with my special insoles in them for support. These shoes have been working hard for me all of the past year since my foot started to hurt bad. They are a bit worn out so once my foot healed, I'm going to look around to invest in another pair of good walking shoes to replace them and keep on using my professionally made support insoles with the new shoes. Good quality shoes can be expensive here in Canada. I have to say, I am not thinking about heals for years to come, as my L foot still need to be watched out for the bunion. So, the only heals I have are my winter leather boots which is not really 'high healed', just a bit higher than my other flats.

I will keep you posted of my updates after the 2nd visit to my foot doc later today. Hope to bring you good news of progress.
Hi Profmia:

Your posting said you had a bunion removal 2 years ago for your left foot, was this operation for your R foot a lot different in operation procedure than the L foot?
As you could see from my previous posting that I had my bunion surgery done (austin cut) for my right foot (I am right handed too) just around mid march of this year. It has been just past 4 months (and 2 weeks) as of today. I am feeling good and happy with my recovery.

I had one long pin in my foot, and was removed after 4.5 weeks,after a 2nd x-ray was done and ensured that the new bone is forming good.

Like you, I was VERY worried and almost got into a depression during the first 3 weeks post op. Mostly due to the pain & change of lifestlye (crutches became my friend) and the feeling of not-so-useful, and dependence upon my husband. I am an outgoing full time working mom, so being home bounded for weeks was killing me. I was drosy the 1st week too due to the amount of pain killers I had to take to ease the post op pain. Anyway, I was told not to shower for 3 full weeks or until the wound is closed up (my surgeon checked me every week and changed the dressing for me). I had a little drainage 24 hours after my surgery but it quickly stopped. My doc was fantastic and encouraged me every week when I saw her. I done the surgery by this private foot surgeron so I could see her for post-op visit weekly based on her schedule. After about 3 weeks, the wound closed and I could take shower (but be very careful not to slip inside the shower). I was wearing a plastic leg cover called 'seal tight' to cover my entire leg and with the help of hubby, I could take a bath every other day without getting the operated right foot wet. So, I lived like that for 3 weeks, and rejoiced when I could be independent to take showers. Then, when I could stand a bit better, I slowly become even more independent every part of my daily life. I was told to bear weight gently after about 4 weeks, heel first, and then after 5 days, mid part of the foot as well, and another 5 days, I could start to be brave and bare weight for the whole foot - bit by bit. Then, by 5 week, I could walk a bit without crutches (but wearing my support boot) and walk a bit here and there around the home and very very short distance. Later, after about 6 weeks, I could walk more on my boot for short walks!! Rejoice - finally I can leave my home longer!!! Then, back to work at 7th week post-op, wore the support boot for 1 week, then learned to let go of the boot and wore runners to work, again, lifting my foot up as often as I could in the office. I placed a paper box under my desk and that helped me for weeks!! Now, I don't even need to lift my foot up that often during the day, and can go without the box for an entire work day. Just some very minor swelling left here and there during some evenings after work. I will have good warm bath with bath salts to let my foot relax, and it helps me sleep well. As of today, I can wear normal soft leather office style shoes (almost back to my normal size again. I have been wearing a pair of size 7 soft leather shoes for a while, I am normally a 6.5
This don't bother me as the extra half size gives me more space in case the foot swells a little bit.
I can go for long walks again, not ready back for jogging yet. I should see my foot doc again by late Aug or early Sept (I only need to see her once every 2 months now), and if she gives me the OK, I should be back to my yoga, my jogging and a bit of running by Fall. I still need to massage and do a lot of foot exerices to keep my scar tissue relax and flexible, so not to get lazy and sniff due to the healing from the operation. I still feel the tightness around the wound area at my big toe every now and then, so I am also seeing my physico person to keep practising on the foot exercises. I am almost there!
I am going to be 44 in late August and before my surgery, walking a block would be painful to me. I had to give up hiking 2 years ago due to my bunion pain, it was not huge but was pressing on a nerve under my foot, therefor the pain was intense when it happened. I checked into many options and tried them all. After seeing my foot doc for a year, I decided to go ahead while I am younger and still want to be more active. She does a great job and very caring. For now, I am trying to make sure my R foot heals 100% before I starting thinking of my L foot. My L foot also has a bunion and I am sure eventually it will get to me. Just a matter of time (I was given a window of 3 more years)....Very likely, I should operate on it within 3 years, once I saved up the $ and emotionally ready to do this all over again. I also need to pick a good time to go off work, as my office is a busy office. My 7 weeks off was a new thing to them and my coworkers have been great to me. I cherish them a lot for covering my work all those time.

For the scar, I have been using Vit E cream given by my foot doc. I have also massage organic olive oil to the scar area nightly after it was all healed together with the vit E cream. So far, the scar is there but not 'toooo bad' considering the operation I had. I will continue to take care of the scar hoping to make it as minimal as possible.

Recovery does take time, and is a testing of patience. It is well worth it now that I looked back. I have to thank my dear hubby, daughter (she is now 16) and many great friends and coworkers for visiting, encouragement and helping me during my 7 weeks. Those are the main line support for me to get through this, emotionally and physically. I also say a lot of prayers too, and they are of spiritual comfort to me when I was really down!

Take care and don't worry too much. A happy mood will really lift up your spirit and helps the healing. Have peace! Keep writing us notes here if they help you :angel:

Hugs,
Hotdog girl





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