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Heart Disorders Message Board


Heart Disorders Board Index


PVCs are among the most common ventricular dysrhythmias. They can be found in young healthy persons or in diseased hearts. It is a premature beat (in the ventricle) that occurs earlier than the next expected beat. [I]Worrisome[/I] PVCs include the following: 1) more than 6 per minute. 2) PVCs that occur in bigeminy (every second beat), trigeminy (every third beat), or quadrigeminy (every fouth beat). 3) 2 PVCs in a row (couplets) 4) 3 (or more) PVCs in a row (ventricular tachycardia). 5) Multifocal PVCs (on an ECG, these are PVCs that look different from each other, which means that they originate from different places in the ventricles).
Causes of PVCs include: exercise, stress, caffeine, hypoxia (lack of O2), anxiety, alcohol, tobacco, electrolyte imbalance, certain drugs, heart attack, and congestive heart failure.

A PAC is a premature beat (in the atria) that also occurs earlier than the next expected beat. Causes include: caffeine, alcohol, stress, hypoxia, pulmonary disease, and heart disease. They can also occur in healthy individuals (like myself ;) ).

Now, SVT on the other hand is a [I]completely[/I] different story. Supraventricular tachycardia broken down - supraventricular (above the ventricles, in the atria), tachycardia (elevated heart rate). Heart rate associated with SVT can be anywhere from 150-250 beats per minute. Because the heart is beating so fast, it does not have adequate time to fill and empty completely. This causes a decrease in the amount of circulating blood in the body which can cause lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea, sweating, fainting, chest pain, low blood pressure, shortness of breath, etc.

VT (ventricular tachycardia) originates from the venticles. The heart rate for VT is 101-250 beats per minute. V-tach occurs when there is a run of three or more PVCs in a row and a rate of more than 101 beats per minute. V-tach may be short, lasting less than 30 seconds or it may be sustained, lasting up to several hours. It may or may not occur with a pulse, the person may or may not be conscious, or the person may be stable with normal vital signs or unstable with low blood pressure or no vital signs. It is usually caused by myocardial (heart) irritability, electrolyte imbalance, coronary artery disease, mitral valve prolapse, rheumatic heart disease, and pulmonary embolism.

From a medical standpoint, PACs (usually) don't concern me and PVCs only concern me in patients known to have heart disease or if there are many. The heart rate in patients having PACs and PVCs is normal unless there is an underlying problem with the heart. SVT and V-tach are [I]always[/I] concerning to me. To tell the difference , you only need to check your pulse. If your heart is beating so quickly that it's difficult or impossible to count, then that's a problem. If you're feeling lightheaded, dizzy, or nauseous, then that's also a problem.
[QUOTE=Sassafrass627][I]Worrisome[/I] PVCs include the following: 1) more than 6 per minute. 2) PVCs that occur in bigeminy (every second beat), trigeminy (every third beat), or quadrigeminy (every fouth beat). 3) 2 PVCs in a row (couplets) 4) 3 (or more) PVCs in a row (ventricular tachycardia). 5) Multifocal PVCs (on an ECG, these are PVCs that look different from each other, which means that they originate from different places in the ventricles). [/QUOTE]

Why are these worrysome? (except for 4), that I can understand)
When I get PVC's, I get them like: normal beat - extrasystolic beat - normal - beat - extrasystolic beat - normal beat - ... Is this bigeminy or couplets?
Also, when I have them, it's usually more than 6 per minute.
How could this be worrysome?





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