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Nail Problems Message Board


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[QUOTE=gabbie]ive used home done kits and had my nails done at salons. i used to get my nails done every 2 weeks for about a year with no problems. but one time a last summer i did them with the same brand kit id used before and my cuticles got puss under them. i had little itchy bumps all over my fingers and all.. you would think i wouldnt use it again but i did a few more times... same thing slightly worse each time. well i was messing with acrylic and i spilled some on my leg. my leg broke out with red itchy bumps it was very painfull and swollen. it spread from one thigh to the other and up and down my legs. it got on my arm and spread all down my wrist from my elbow and up my upper arm. the skin on my fingers feels waxy... is there anything any of you know about treating this reaction, what causes it (because dried acrylic doesnt bother me but liquid does.), my fingers swell slightly if i use normal nail polish aswell. and um anything to help the pain? anysuggestions are appresiated

Thank you
Gabbie[/QUOTE]

Girl, you are [I]severly allergic[/I] TO ANYTHING THAT CONTAINS ACRYLIC (acrylates). Do not sand I repeat DO NOT attempt to use any type of artificial nail product on you rnails again. Once we are allergic, we are allergic for LIFE.

Allergic reaction happens after repeated and prolonged skin contact to an allergen, and in your case, it is acrylates. Acrylates are found in all instant glues, including those for fingernails, wood, metal and fabric (super glue, etc.). Acrylates are found in ALL artificial nail products, including liquid & powder acrylic, gel acrylic and wrap resins.

Once you experience an allergic reaxtion, it wil only get worse with each exposure. You will have to remove the nails and DO NOT reapply. If you continue to do so, your entire nail plate can permanently lift (separate) from the nail bed, and it may never reattach.

You need to tell your dentist that you are allergic to acrylic in both liquid and gel form. Dentists usually use gel acrylic (which is cured with a UV light) to fill teeth. Your dentist may have to resort to metal fillings if he just needs to fill a tooth. He can still use acrylic to form a crown or cap because this is always cured to its hardened form before it is cemented into your mouth.

Since acrylic liquids are considered volatile (they evaporate in the air), you may also experience an allergic reaction through 'smell' because if yu can smell it, it can touch your skin. If you even go into a nail salon and nail dust touches your skin, you can experience an allergic reaaction because newly applied acrylic (dust) contains uncured monomers (liquid) that can cause reaction if it touches you anywhere.

Please visit my website and read the pages on 'preventing overexposure" and "allergic reaction"; www.hooked-on-nails.com (link approved by Moderator 1). It will give you a lot of insight.

As for experiencing allergic reaction to nail polish, you may also be allergic to formaldehyde, which is found in all nail polishs, including base and topcoats. If you are allergic to formaldehyde, you can be allergic to as little as one part per million parts of air. What I am saying is that you are experiencing an ACUTE reaction and need to remove yur artificial nails, do not reapply them, and stay out of salons - this includes doing yur own nails at home.
[QUOTE=Marti]Girl, you are [I]severly allergic[/I] TO ANYTHING THAT CONTAINS ACRYLIC (acrylates). Do not sand I repeat DO NOT attempt to use any type of artificial nail product on you rnails again. Once we are allergic, we are allergic for LIFE.

Allergic reaction happens after repeated and prolonged skin contact to an allergen, and in your case, it is acrylates. Acrylates are found in all instant glues, including those for fingernails, wood, metal and fabric (super glue, etc.). Acrylates are found in ALL artificial nail products, including liquid & powder acrylic, gel acrylic and wrap resins.

Once you experience an allergic reaxtion, it wil only get worse with each exposure. You will have to remove the nails and DO NOT reapply. If you continue to do so, your entire nail plate can permanently lift (separate) from the nail bed, and it may never reattach.

You need to tell your dentist that you are allergic to acrylic in both liquid and gel form. Dentists usually use gel acrylic (which is cured with a UV light) to fill teeth. Your dentist may have to resort to metal fillings if he just needs to fill a tooth. He can still use acrylic to form a crown or cap because this is always cured to its hardened form before it is cemented into your mouth.

Since acrylic liquids are considered volatile (they evaporate in the air), you may also experience an allergic reaction through 'smell' because if yu can smell it, it can touch your skin. If you even go into a nail salon and nail dust touches your skin, you can experience an allergic reaaction because newly applied acrylic (dust) contains uncured monomers (liquid) that can cause reaction if it touches you anywhere.

Please visit my website and read the pages on 'preventing overexposure" and "allergic reaction"; www.hooked-on-nails.com (link approved by Moderator 1). It will give you a lot of insight.

As for experiencing allergic reaction to nail polish, you may also be allergic to formaldehyde, which is found in all nail polishs, including base and topcoats. If you are allergic to formaldehyde, you can be allergic to as little as one part per million parts of air. What I am saying is that you are experiencing an ACUTE reaction and need to remove yur artificial nails, do not reapply them, and stay out of salons - this includes doing yur own nails at home.[/QUOTE]
I checked out your web site, www.hooked-on-nails.com and found that you decribed my problem to the "T" along with the above responses. I was having acrylic applied every 3-4 weeks. All was good until I had this severe reaction. I went to a new salon that had just opened in my area and explained my problem. They recommended that I switch to "Silk Wrap" which was more "natural". Problem solved! Now after a year of using silk wrap I had the same reaction. Itching started about 3 hours after having nails done and lasted about a week. Went back to have fill in about 3 weeks later and reaction started about 2 hours after and still continues 2 weeks later. My nails are fine, no fungus. Area effected are cuticles up to about 2nd knuckle. If I have this type of reaction and it gets worse each time I have my nails done. I started having my nails done originally because I've always had VERY SOFT nails. They were thin and would split. What am I to do if you say "not even at home"? I'm in need of a refill soon.Thanks Darlene
[QUOTE=darlenebon]I checked out your web site, www.hooked-on-nails.com and found that you decribed my problem to the "T" along with the above responses. I was having acrylic applied every 3-4 weeks. All was good until I had this severe reaction. I went to a new salon that had just opened in my area and explained my problem. They recommended that I switch to "Silk Wrap" which was more "natural". Problem solved! Now after a year of using silk wrap I had the same reaction. Itching started about 3 hours after having nails done and lasted about a week. Went back to have fill in about 3 weeks later and reaction started about 2 hours after and still continues 2 weeks later. My nails are fine, no fungus. Area effected are cuticles up to about 2nd knuckle. If I have this type of reaction and it gets worse each time I have my nails done. I started having my nails done originally because I've always had VERY SOFT nails. They were thin and would split. What am I to do if you say "not even at home"? I'm in need of a refill soon.Thanks Darlene[/QUOTE]

Severe allergic reaction can result in your natural nail plate permanently separating from the nail bed. I highly suggest you have the wrap soaked off and opt for natural nail care. Once allergic, we are allergic for LIFE - and that means an allergy to artificial nail products. Since ALL artificial nail products are made with some form of acrylic, you will experience the same reaction regardless of what product you apply in the salon or what product you apply at home if you decide to try doing your own nails.

Acrylic is found in all types of wrap resins, which is the 'stuff' they glue the fabric to you rnails with. It is foundin nail glue, wrap resins, primers, liquid and powder systems, gel systems, UV gel systems, etc.

I don't think wearing artificial nails are worth the possible loss of your natural nails in your case. Soak them off and leave them natural.
The harm is that eventually, the nail plate WILL separate from the nail bed - that is the ACUTE reaction from acrylates. ALL ACRYLIC PRODUCTS CONTAIN ACRYLIC - this includes traditional liquid and powder acrylic, gel ACRYLIC, wrap resins, nail glue and primers. The only difference between experiencing an allergic reaction to gel vs liquid and powder is it just takes a little longer for the reaction to happen, but it WILL happen.

The blisters, swelling and itching are the body's way of telling us it needs to get away from the allergen - in this case, acrylates.

Doing your own nails is is sure-fire way of aquiring an allergy much quicker than in a salon. Nail technicians are trained on the proper procedures adn the correct mix ratios. If you apply the product too wet, the excess liquid runs into the skin surrounding the nail unit as well as being absorbed through the nail plate into the nail bed. Repeated exposure WILL cause the nail plate to separate from the nail bed - sometimes permanently damaging the nail bed and even if a nail does grow forward from the cuticle, it may not grow forward firmly attached to the nail bed. this translates into permanent nail damage and ugly nails for the rest of your life.

Repeated exposure to acrylates after an allergic reaction happens can also affect other bodily functions. The acrylate can get into your blood stream and cause other internal health problems.

Artificial nails are not worth permanently damaging your natural nails or damaging your internal health in other ways.

I highly suggest soaking the nails off and opting for natural nail care.

Believe me - I have been a nail technician for nearly 37 years, I have been trained by the most knowledgable chemists in the business and if I were you, I wouldnt allow my health to be effected for the rest of my life just to wear artificial (long) nails.

For more information on overexposure and allergic reaction, please visit my website www.hooked-on-nails.com ( link approved by Moderator 1)
I really hate to tell you this - gel nail products are also acrylic. They are made from the same family of acrylates as tradition liquid and powder acrylic. Gel is even more prone to giving the client an allergic reaction. Whenever any nail product touches the skin, the skin will absorb a certain amount of the chemical and the body will react by causing the skin to becme red, irritated, itchy; the nail plate can feel very hot and sometimes small blisters will develop around the cuticle and sidewalls.

ALL artificial nail products are made from the same family of acrylates and this includes traditional acrylic, gel acrylic, nail glue and wrap resins. Soaking in salt water does nothing to prevent allergic reaction or infection and will only tend to dry out the nails and the skin.

All the State Boards have written regulations concerning sanitation and disinfecing prodedures for salons. All salons are required to only use individual files on individual clients. If you can see dust on the files or on the drill bits, if the entire table is not cleaned off and disinfected between clients, if the instruments and implements are not completely emersed in a sanitizing solution for a full 10 minutes and then put into an autoclave and stored in sealed containers, then they are not following State guidelines. The end result for the client is the possibility of infection and a lawsuit for the salon should the client aquire an infection from improper procedures.





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