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Cancer: Cervical & Ovarian Message Board


Cancer: Cervical & Ovarian Board Index


Adenocarcinoma in situ is not cancer. It is the highest level of precancer, but it is not cancer because it is not invasive beyond the cell wall.

You still should have been told.

If your doctor knew anything about glandular cell abnormalities (AIS), then he would have known that having clear margins for a lesion isn't a guarantee that there aren't other lesions elsewhere. Did he/she do another LEEP?

Glandular cell abnormalities are not usually identified by a pap. The pap only samples some tissue from the outer cervix (squamous cells). The ECC is the only non-surgical way to sample the canal where the glandular cells are. The LEEP and/or CKC (cold knife cone - preferred procedure for AIS) are the surgical ways to biopsy the glandular canals to get a better idea of the glandular involvement.

Have you had repeated colposcopies and ECCs after the AIS diagnosis? Did you have a second LEEP after you had the AIS diagnosis? If so, it is possible that the dysplasia was removed and you are fine.

Have you had a uterine biopsy?

You didn't say how old you are. A women younger than 30 is more likely to be able to recover/heal from HPV related dysplasia better than a woman over 30.

Are you wanting to preserve your fertility?

As far as other tests, right now, they need to be checking on the cervical canal with ECCs and/or CKCs (cold knife cones, not LEEP).

I had a CT of my pelvis a few months before diagnosis with Adenocarcinoma Ia1* and did not show up on the scan. The lesion was too small. If it shows up on a CD or MRI, then then I'd assume it is quite invasive.

Yes, you should have been sent to a gyn/onc with the AIS results.

I hope this gives you a little more info.

* I was diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma Ia1 2 years ago by way of a CKC. The gyn/onc did a total hyst (cervix and uterus only) and I didn't need chemo or radiation since the cancer was found so early. I was released from the gyn/onc at my 1 year anniversary. I am now 2 years cancer free. My reasons for saying this is because if adenocarcinoma is found early enough, treatment is relatively conservative (in my opinion - compared with many other cancers) and there are other options (repeated CKCs, a trachelectomy, etc).
[QUOTE=Pickle Eyes;4283268]Adenocarcinoma in situ is not cancer. It is the highest level of precancer, but it is not cancer because it is not invasive beyond the cell wall.

You still should have been told.

If your doctor knew anything about glandular cell abnormalities (AIS), then he would have known that having clear margins for a lesion isn't a guarantee that there aren't other lesions elsewhere. Did he/she do another LEEP?

Glandular cell abnormalities are not usually identified by a pap. The pap only samples some tissue from the outer cervix (squamous cells). The ECC is the only non-surgical way to sample the canal where the glandular cells are. The LEEP and/or CKC (cold knife cone - preferred procedure for AIS) are the surgical ways to biopsy the glandular canals to get a better idea of the glandular involvement.

Have you had repeated colposcopies and ECCs after the AIS diagnosis? Did you have a second LEEP after you had the AIS diagnosis? If so, it is possible that the dysplasia was removed and you are fine.

Have you had a uterine biopsy?

You didn't say how old you are. A women younger than 30 is more likely to be able to recover/heal from HPV related dysplasia better than a woman over 30.

Are you wanting to preserve your fertility?

As far as other tests, right now, they need to be checking on the cervical canal with ECCs and/or CKCs (cold knife cones, not LEEP).

I had a CT of my pelvis a few months before diagnosis with Adenocarcinoma Ia1* and did not show up on the scan. The lesion was too small. If it shows up on a CD or MRI, then then I'd assume it is quite invasive.

Yes, you should have been sent to a gyn/onc with the AIS results.

I hope this gives you a little more info.

* I was diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma Ia1 2 years ago by way of a CKC. The gyn/onc did a total hyst (cervix and uterus only) and I didn't need chemo or radiation since the cancer was found so early. I was released from the gyn/onc at my 1 year anniversary. I am now 2 years cancer free. My reasons for saying this is because if adenocarcinoma is found early enough, treatment is relatively conservative (in my opinion - compared with many other cancers) and there are other options (repeated CKCs, a trachelectomy, etc).[/QUOTE]
This questions is for Pickle Eyes...I think I've read every post you've ever written so far! I too have gotten an AIS result from a colposcopy and biopsy. You say in your post that glandular abnormalities aren't usually found by paps because only squamous cells are on the outer cervix. I have a spot - able to be seen through colposcopy - on my cervix that my regular OBGYN didn't think was alarming during colposcopy but biopsied it anyway. There is also a spot that he thought was precancer on my cervix (turned out to be CIN II), so he was right about that one. I've been referred to a gyn/onc, saw him yesterday and he chose to do a "deep leep" as he called it, and tool A LOT of my cervix. Now I'm supposed to go back in 2 weeks. Of course I am INSANE with worry because of the difficult and rarer nature of Adenocarcinoma. I'm scared out of my mind. My main question is, how did a spot of AIS show up on the outside of my cervix? My ECC was clean, it said benign cells. (The gyn/onc did another right after the LEEP yesterday). I would love some information from someone...is it terrible that a spot has shown up on the outside of my cervix?





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