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Smoking Cessation Message Board


Smoking Cessation Board Index


Hi all! I just came from my psychiatrist this morning who said I should pretty much be over the psychological withdrawal of smoking. I don't know--I think everyone is different. I went to a dentist once who quit 3 packs a day and it took him a year to get over the craving. I would like to hear different opinions on this subject because after smoking for over 30 years it's like losing a part of your whole system--a crummy part--but a part no less. She thinks after that then it's just almost OCD. Thanks so much--Hopeto
Hopeto.. No one can tell you when you SHOULD be over the cravings. Shoot it's been almost three years for me and sometimes out of nowhere I think yah know I'd sell my kid to the gypsies for just a drag if I knew I could do it without becoming addicted again. Everyone is different there is no recipe, however, you should on the other hand try to focus on other things it's my strong belief that those who use those time counter life saved thingys are still super focused on smoking. Try to fill your thoughts with other things instead of how long it's been. You can do it it's already at the point where the residual withdrawal symptoms start to fade away and it becomes much easier after the three month mark.

Good luck friend!!!! Keep up the great work
Hi L-Mom! You know, you're right--a person should try to focus on other things. The fact that I have been able to go this far this time around without a cig is nothing short of a miracle for me. The longest I have gone is roughly 6 months and it was always depression that set me back- I would usually relapse in the fall time--shorter days, early darkness--but I have learned through the years that this is my depression kicking in. I am in treatment for clinical depression and mood swings and really like my clinicians. I take 2 low doses of meds every day and I am able to do something different every day. This keeps things fresh and my mind pretty much stays occupied. Every once in a while I will get a memory of smoking or if I'm near a convenient store where a butt or stub is burning in the outside ashtray will I get the smell permeating through my skull and oh boy could I go back in a New York minute! By the grace of God did I put it down and leave it down to this point and have discussed my obsession of smoking and quitting. My psych doc said that I should be over the psychological withdrawal after 3 months and if it persists that I should be in treatment for OCD tendencies. Believe me, I know that OCD does run in the family, but after being obsessed with nicotine for over 30 years and now it's gone, it takes longer than just over 3 months to get over it. I would think a person has to go through all of the seasons to get over something. Maybe I'll just keep quiet and not bring it up again to her. Thanks so much for your much needed pep talk! God bless & take care--Hopeto--
HopeTo - Liamsmom hit it right dead center. After thirty five years of smoking (and, I was very good at it!) I know it's going to take me longer than just a measly 365 days to be completely over it. I quit last June using Chantix as my crutch, and I could still light one up. I miss my lighter ... miss that first inhale ... and, I'm going to keep on missing it! I never dreamt that I could really quit, and after the struggle to get this far, I'm not about to go through that again. Ask the psych how long it was before he was over it. He's probably not been a nicotine addict, and so you'll find that he read it in a book somewhere. You ARE on track - YOUR TRACK, and don't let the goonies get in your way! Keep smilin ;)
Hi L-Mom & Stauff--Thanks so much for the most wonderful encouraging words from you both. It has really made me feel better and I took this issue also to my Wednesday nite smoking group. The support person said she never heard of anyone suggesting OCD because someone quit smoking. Another party in the group asked how long I have been going to the pdoc. I said since November. He said "She doesn't really know you". In all fairness to the doctor, there is a strong disposition to OCD I really feel in my family and I know my inlaws have it. It's just another facet of an anxiety disorder, and as I've learned in a 12 step group in the past, there is the insanity of the obsession leading to the compulsive act creating the addiction process. It probably mentally took me a few years to get over being without coffee or tea(caffeinated). I really feel it will take me at least a year to even get past an occasional craving. I wish some psychiatrists would take more courses in addiction medicine. Perhaps that will be the next route to take if things don't work out with the pdoc. I don't know--she really seems to know what she's doing, but I could be wrong. People don't realize that after you've "kicked "everything else and the cigarette is the last to go, it can be torturous. Every muscle, nerve ending and emotion has been saturated in nicotine and junk for years on end and you only know how to behave while under the influence of nicotine. You are really starting your life over sometimes just a minute at a time and I have to say I have done a lot of prayer and have been so grateful for every ounce of support I have received. We didn't have boards like this or groups 20 years ago and we are so lucky. At least I'm lucky for friends like you guys!! Thanks again and God bless--Hopeto--
Nicotine is a chemical and it clears the body in a relatively short period of time. The habit part and mindset of many years is another story. I think we need to retrain our brains to overcome triggers when craving a cigarette whether it be when under stress or all the other things that caused us to light up. For those of us who have maintained a quit for some time, it's no longer a nicotine craving, it's a psychological craving. Those don't go away over night. We need to understand that all the crave is, is a thought, a memory of a past habit that we once used as a crutch or as a pleasure tool or for whatever other reason, nothing more. For some this truth comes easy, for others it's a journey that has to be worked upon. I believe that it may be harder for those who have smoked a long time comparing to those who have smoked a short time, but each of us are different and the reasons why we smoke or smoked are different so this needs to be taken into account as well.

I've been smoke free for over two years and while I no longer think about smoking all of the time, there are times I still crave one especially when I smell someone smoking. That's a trigger. The other day I was coming home from the store and momentarily thought to get home quick so I can have a cigarette. That's what I use to do before, I don't smoke anymore but that little bit of data still remains in my memory bank. All these are, are psychological flash backs of past habits, past thoughts and actions, and they do pass quickly, going as quickly as they came if you don't give into them. Once you know this truth, it's easier to remain smoke free once and for all.

I'm still working on this psychological aspect of my quit. It's a journey.
It's been 6 months for me. I was cig free for 5 days in the hosp w/ pneumonia and when I came home I figured I'd be a complete idiot not to take the opportunity and quit for good. It has been a huge battle.

This is the 3rd time I've quit. The first time was after my first child was born and lasted 2 years until a major traumatic event happened then I started back.

The 2nd time (btw, I used patches all 3 times) I lasted 6 days and I was so majorly depressed I slept all day and really didn't move. It put me in a major depression. (I'm also bipolar so the chemical reaction at that time was just too much for me)

This last time I am determined. I used both the patches and the gum. (yes I know you're not supposed to use it together, but they were both low dosages) I have had major side effects. At least, this is what we're thinking NOW. I've had constant shortness of breath and I assumed it had something to do w/ the pneumonia. Then when all tests for lungs and heart turned out that I was healthy as a horse, my dr is now trying anti anxiety meds under the asumption that after smoking for 20 yrs I used it as an anxiety crutch and now that I've quit I just need a little help coping for the time being.

It's hard. It's SOOOO damn hard. BUT. I will NOT have another cig. Period. I'll figure this out eventually.

But I digress haahaa Back to how you should be over the cravings by now.

The first time by 3 months I was. I'm still not yet after 6 months. Here's a little trick to see if you are or not.

Stand next to a person that's smoking. Does it smell good? If it does, you're not over it.
Maybe it's because you loved it and miss it now. I have been a smoker for 25 years. I quit once for two years- started back. I quit again for seven years, started back. Another time I quit for two years and started back. My doctor says I have an 'addictive personality', whatever that means. But I have to say I did love to smoke. It was my friend. And when I wasn't smoking, I always wanted a cigarette. Today is my 7th day without a cigarette. I'm trying it again. I used the Chantix so I'm not missing them so much this time.

I'm sure we're all different. I wouldn't be too concerned about your craving. The important part is to never pick up a cigarette again. I'm going to be stronger than I have been in the past. Just think of the benefits and how good you feel. Personally, it is extremely liberating for me not to have those %$#^ coffin nails dictate what I can do and where I can go everyday! Good luck :)
Hi, glad to see you're still in there fighting this battle and winning the war! I know everyone is different but I think that I am absolulely obcessed with smoking, because I can't quit even though I cry I want & need it so bad, the next minute I'm in the bathroom lighting up! I really think for some (and I am the worst) it is an oboscession(mp) At least your having suscess!! Keep up the good work, I'll bet you feel better already! God bless-dhill2020 p.s. I used to know how to spell!:-)))))
[QUOTE=dhill2020;4181321]Hi, glad to see you're still in there fighting this battle and winning the war! I know everyone is different but I think that I am absolulely obcessed with smoking, because I can't quit even though I cry I want & need it so bad, the next minute I'm in the bathroom lighting up! I really think for some (and I am the worst) it is an oboscession(mp) At least your having suscess!! Keep up the good work, I'll bet you feel better already! God bless-dhill2020 p.s. I used to know how to spell!:-)))))[/QUOTE]

I feel for you. I think we are obsessed. I feel like I just lost my best friend.
Have you tried patches to ease it a bit?
I am on day 36 of non-smoking. Can't say that I like it much, as one of my friends said, "The only good thing she could think of for not smoking was that you didn't have to worry about stopping smoking anymore." That's my attitude except for the money aspect of it. Everytime I want a cigarette; I visulize dropping two twenties and fiver in my large ashtray and setting a match to them. In this case it helps to be cheap.
Besides I have to keep off the weed for at least 14 weeks before I will break even on the expenses of chantrix and acupuncture.
[QUOTE=hopetofeelwell1;3931426]Hi all! I just came from my psychiatrist this morning who said I should pretty much be over the psychological withdrawal of smoking. I don't know--I think everyone is different. I went to a dentist once who quit 3 packs a day and it took him a year to get over the craving. I would like to hear different opinions on this subject because after smoking for over 30 years it's like losing a part of your whole system--a crummy part--but a part no less. She thinks after that then it's just almost OCD. Thanks so much--Hopeto[/QUOTE]

It's been 12 weeks for me Tomorrow. As with anything else that's pleasureable, I still think about it, but each week less and less. I know I won't smoke again but I will always be a smoker.
And check this out---------------------if you smoke just a pack a day you're spending 2 of your waking hours with a cigarette (no wonder it's tuff to quit.





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