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i'm trying to elimate gluten. i was researching oatmeal and a few sites mentioned it contains gluten, while others said it does not. what's the truth?
The Quaker Oatmeal site says oatmeal does contain gluten. It is not enough to make risen bread with yeast but may be more than someone allergic to gluten may be able to tolerate.
I think it does, unfortunately...you have to mostly forget about eating grains if you want to go gluten-free.
my husband has celliac (allergic to gluten) and he must avoid oats or be in pain.. plus barley, rye, spelt, all malts, food dyes like FD&C Red #4, etc.. i can recommend a good list of foods to avoid, if youre interested..
[QUOTE=lionna]my husband has celliac (allergic to gluten) and he must avoid oats or be in pain.. plus barley, rye, spelt, all malts, food dyes like FD&C Red #4, etc.. i can recommend a good list ** foods to avoid, if youre interested..[/QUOTE]
Please post, any info is useful really...
yes, Lionna, please do post a list of foods to avoid.

i've done a little more research on oatmeal and gluten. some say that oatmeal tends to be tolerated better than other gluten containing grains. also, i read a few sites that mentioned oatmeal can help stabalize blood sugar, which i would think would be a good thing for those who have acne due to blook sugar issues? although bad if the person's acne is due to supersensitity to gluten.

has anyone reading this noticed that they specifically break out due to oatmeal? and i mean from the "purest" form, not the prepacked stuff that comes added with flavors, sugar, etc. :angel:
[QUOTE=idealist1976]has anyone reading this noticed that they specifically break out due to oatmeal? and i mean from the "purest" form, not the prepacked stuff that comes added with flavors, sugar, etc. :angel:[/QUOTE]


I eat a big bowl of 5-minute boiled straight-up Quaker oatmeal every morning (with lots of cinnamon and margarine), I don't think it makes any difference, at least for me.
this is the list my husband must avoid.. he has celliac disease, which means he is allergic to gluten and will get very ill if he has any.. i also avoid these, plus everything listed by prometheus..

Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)
Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types)
Barley Grass (can contain seeds)
Barley Hordeum vulgare
Barley Malt
Beer
Bleached Flour
Blue Cheese (made with bread)
Bran
Bread Flour
Brewer's Yeast
Brown Flour
Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)
Bulgur Wheat
Cereal Binding
Chilton
Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum)
Coloring
Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Couscous
Dextrimaltose
Durum wheat (Triticum durum)
Edible Starch
Einkorn (Triticum monococcum)
Emmer (Triticum dicoccon)
Farina Graham
Filler
Food Starch
Fu (dried wheat gluten)
Germ
Graham Flour
Granary Flour
Gravy Cubes4
Groats (barley, wheat)
Ground Spices4
Gum Base
Hard Wheat
Kamut (Pasta wheat)
Malt
Malt Extract
Malt Syrup
Malt Flavoring
Malt Vinegar
Miso4
Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Matzo Semolina
Mustard Powder 4
Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum)
Pasta
Pearl Barley
Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum)
Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum)
Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum)
Rice Malt (contains barley or Koji)
Rye
Seitan
Semolina
Semolina Triticum
Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Shoyu (soy sauce)4 Small Spelt
Soba Noodles4
Soy Sauce
Spirits (Specific Types)
Spelt (Triticum spelta)
Sprouted Wheat or Barley
Stock Cubes4
Strong Flour
Suet in Packets
Tabbouleh
Teriyaki Sauce
Textured Vegetable Protein - TVP
Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii)
Triticale X triticosecale
Udon (wheat noodles)
Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Vegetable Starch
Vitamins4
Wheat Triticum aestivum
Wheat Nuts
Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum
Wheat, Bulgur
Wheat Durum Triticum
Wheat Triticum Monococcum
Wheat Germ (oil)
Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)
Whole-Meal Flour
Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim)
Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)

The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out:

Artificial Color4
Artificial Flavoring6
Caramel Color1, 3
Dextrins1,7
Flavoring6 Hydrolyzed Plant Protein4
Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein4
Maltodextrin8
Modified Food Starch1, 4
Modified Starch1, 4 Mono and Diglycerides1
Monosodium Glutimate (MSG)1, 4
Natural Flavoring6
Starch1, 4
Wheat Starch

* 1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free.
* 2) Mono and diglycerides can contain a wheat carrier in the USA. While they are derivatives of fats, carbohydrate chains may be used as a binding substance in their preparation, which are usually corn or wheat, so this needs to be checked out with the manufacturer.
* 3) The problem with caramel color is it may or may not contain gluten depending on how it is manufactured. In the USA caramel color must conform with the FDA standard of identity from 21CFR CH.1. This statute says: "the color additive caramel is the dark-brown liquid or solid material resulting from the carefully controlled heat treatment of the following food-grade carbohydrates: Dextrose (corn sugar), invert sugar, lactose (milk sugar), malt syrup (usually from barley malt), molasses (from cane), starch hydrolysates and fractions thereof (can include wheat), sucrose (cane or beet)." Also, acids, alkalis and salts are listed as additives which may be employed to assist the caramelization process.
* 4) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.
* 5) Most celiac organizations in the USA and Canada do not believe that wheat starch is safe for celiacs. In Europe, however, Codex Alimentarius Quality wheat starch is considered acceptable in the celiac diet by most doctors and celiac organizations. This is a higher quality of wheat starch than is generally available in the USA or Canada.
* 6) According to 21 C.F.R. S 101,22(a)(3): "[t]he terns 'natural flavor' or 'natural flavoring' means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof. Whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional."
* 7) Dextrin is an incompletely hydrolyzed starch. It is prepared by dry heating corn, waxy maize, waxy milo, potato, arrowroot, WHEAT, rice, tapioca, or sago starches, or by dry heating the starches after: (1) Treatment with safe and suitable alkalis, acids, or pH control agents and (2) drying the acid or alkali treated starch. (1) Therefore, unless you know the source, you must avoid dextrin.

May 1997 Sprue-Nik News.
(1) Federal Register (4-1-96 Edition) 21CFR Ch.1, Section 184.12277.
(2) Federal Register (4-1-96) 21 CFR. Ch.1, Section 184.1444

* 8) Maltodextrin is prepared as a white powder or concentrated solution by partial hydrolysis of corn starch or potato starch with safe and suitable acids and enzymes. (1) Maltodextrin, when listed on food sold in the USA, must be (per FDA regulation) made from corn or potato. This rule does NOT apply to vitamin or mineral supplements and medications. (2) Donald Kasarda Ph.D., a research chemist specializing on grain proteins, of the United States Department of Agriculture, found that all maltodextrins in the USA are made from corn starch, using enzymes that are NOT derived from wheat, rye, barley, or oats. On that basis he believes that celiacs need not be too concerned about maltodextrins, though he cautions that there is no guarantee that a manufacturer won't change their process to use wheat starch or a gluten-based enzyme in the future. (3) - May 1997 Sprue-Nik News
1. Federal Register (4-1-96) 21 CFR. Ch.1, Section 184.1444
2."Additives Alert", an information sheet from the Greater Philadelphia Celiac Support Group, updated early in 1997. This specific information comes from Nancy Patin Falini, the dietitian advisor for the group and a speaker at a national celiac conferences in the past few years.
3. From the CELLIAC Listserv archives, on the Internet, Donald D. Kasarda, posted November 6, 1996.
I would like to know what makes oatmeal contain gluten? Do raw oats have gluten in them?
Oatmeal itself does not contain gluten. HOWEVER, most oatmeal is grown in fields where wheat is grown, so it contains gluten via cross-contamination. You can buy "certified gluten free oats" any most health food stores no problem. People with celiac disease need to avoid any oats that are not certified gluten free. Does that help?
[QUOTE=lulu23;4649414]Oatmeal itself does not contain gluten. HOWEVER, most oatmeal is grown in fields where wheat is grown, so it contains gluten via cross-contamination. You can buy "certified gluten free oats" any most health food stores no problem. People with celiac disease need to avoid any oats that are not certified gluten free. Does that help?[/QUOTE]

Yes very much so. Thank you. for now on I will only eat oats that are certified gluten free
Also, the factories where the oats are prepared usualy also have wheat products in them, so cross contamination there. As the above poster says, buy certifued gluten free and you'll be fine





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