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ADD / ADHD Message Board


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i'm 28, in grad school, diagnosed with ADD several years ago but only really getting help now. i'm feeling very defeated tonight - i've spent most of my adult life trying to 'get it together' with varying degress of termporary success. i've read a huge amount in the past six months or so, and finally accepted my diagnosis, plus my coach is really good, but i'm just feeling disheartened. i suppose its because in the past i've tried to 'change' quite a bit without any real understanding of why i was struggling and why it felt so confusing and so difficult. i've had my share of successes and happy times, but i've struggled for so many years with periodic bouts of depression, pathologic procastination, failed relationships and friendships, many crises (financial and otherwise) and a couple of moments in which i just could not meet my responsibilities and my life just snowballed out of control for a few months as i withdrew more and more. i am slowly coming to feel good about the ADD diagnosis, as it also affirms some of the things i like most about myself (energy, creativity, etc) but i think this evening i am feeling terrified that i might not be able to learn to manage it - that i might repeat these mistakes for the rest of my life.

i thought there might be someone out there tonight who's been through a diagnosis that didn't happen until their 20's, and could offer some words of encouragement.

oh one random thing - as for all you 'add is a myth' types, i wish i hadn't listened to you for so long. i'm also suspect of the pharmaceutical industry and strongly think people should be encouraged to experiment with coaching, diet changes, exercise, meditation, etc., but i really think your agenda is doing a disservice to those of us who have ADD in a way that is un-ambiguously real.
Well you've already taken the first step by getting accessed, diagnosed and recognizing this is a condition that is life-long. Now it's time to get help and treatment. Don't stop now! Force yourself to follow through with treatment, even if it is the AD/HD that is not allowing you to do so. Forcing yourself to do something physical, such as being physically present somewhere (such as the doctor's office), is much easier than forcing your brain (if possible) to cognitively work.

Many people have been diagnosed as an adult, began treatment and their lives have done a complete 180. Make an appointment with a qualified psychiatrist and psychologist who specializes in treating AD/HD in adults.

One part of the AD/HD process is being stubborn and trying to justify that "nothing is wrong", "everyone else is the problem", and that this disorder is just a huge 'myth'. Furthermore, thinking AD/HD damaging behavioral symptoms are 'normal' is completely wrong and taking the easy way out.

If you do follow that path, you will be chasing your tail forever and be completely miserable. It will only be a matter of time that you will realize that you're only cheating yourself out of the help you truly deserve. And hopefully this is that time!


[QUOTE]but i've struggled for so many years with periodic bouts of depression, pathologic procastination, failed relationships and friendships, many crises (financial and otherwise) and a couple of moments in which i just could not meet my responsibilities and my life just snowballed out of control for a few months as i withdrew more and more.[/QUOTE]

Every one of these symptoms are major symptoms of AD/HD, and due to the working nature of the frontal lobes. When you have true AD/HD your frontal lobes aren't working correctly, not metabolizing glucose properly, and ultimately have little activity. If you have poor functioning frontal lobes, you can also say hello to mood problems. The frontal lobes regulate the limbic system (the emotional center of the brain), so when the frontal lobes don't do their 'job' properly, the limbic system is unable to regulate your mood and you can have comorbid depression/anxiety disorders as well.

The best AD/HD treatment is not a pure "natural" or a pure "western medicine" type of treatment. It is an individual based multi-parameter treatment, which includes medication, meditation, diet, supplements, exercise, structure and education.

Learning how your brain operates is the absolute best thing you can do. Knowing when and what type of medication(s) to take, what foods will interact both positively and negatively with your cognitive abilities, how much exercise and what type of exercise you need, getting help from professionals that have been studying this disorder for a multitude of years, and various other strategies is the only way you can truly get this condition under control.

If you don't learn these valuable assets (which the majority of the population is able to take for granted), you will be a victim and slave to your brain for as long as you live.





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