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I am sorry if this is a dumb question, but I don't know anything about ADD. However, my 10 yr old son is suspected of having ADD and he is being evaluated by a psychologist this month.
Just wondering what the future holds for a child with ADD. Are they able to go to college and succeed in a college environment? Are there professionals (ie doctors, lawyers, etc) that have ADD and that take meds for ADD?
My son has always been a very good student--particularly when it comes to taking standardized tests...his scores are phenomenal. If he has ADD, does he have a bright academic future?
Also, on a related topic, a co-worker with adult ADD told me that there is no way that my son has ADD if he can do so well on long, silent, standardized tests. She says an ADD person could not focus well enough in that type of environment. Any ideas as to how or why my son does better on standardized tests than in a regular class environment? Thank you for your input.
ADD folks can go to college and do well in a career. I think a key is understanding the condition and shaping life around its specific needs. Get educated. Go buy a couple of books. Talk to the doctor. Talk to other parents here.

There is no one ADHD type, so it makes it hard to put a person in a class or category. Definite common traits/symptoms among ADD people, but no universal checklist that one mark includes or excludes someone.

It is good that you are addressing the possibility of ADD for your child right now. If diagnosed, by law, schools have to accomodate to specific needs of your child, though I don't always agree with how that is carried out. I have a brother who is full blown dyslexic. He was identified in the 3rd grade, and this was several years ago when most people hadn't heard of dyslexia. I remember watching him as a teen sit at his desk and get red faced or sometimes even cry as he did homework sometimes. However, he went through tutoring at a young age and my parents got educated about his needs. My brother was a very hard worker--very determined--very disciplined, and he graduated third in his class, was very successful in college, and now has a good hospital job.

I think his discipline and structure was the worst predecessor for an ADD child to follow behind..hehee. Anyway, I'm 30 and just recently diagnosed as ADD. I never had the discipline/behavior problems in school, so no one ever thought anything about ADD and no one knew much about it then anyway. I did well in grade school. I did okay in high school. I always had good written language skills, so I was successful at BS-ing my way through tests in a lot of classes. Still, I got the constant "you could do so much better, you're smarter than your report card, if you just cared more about your grades, etc." talks. Anyway, I went to college. Of course it took me six years to finally get my undergraduate degree and that was with summer classes. If your son wants to, he can. May not be easy, but with an understanding of how he ticks from this age and parents who understand, he has a leg up.

As far as standardized tests--I always did well on those. My biggest struggle w/ those, however, was to not doodle cartoons on the bubble sheet. Thank goodness they gave us scrap paper...
I'm ADHD and in grad school, with straight As. Don't worry!
For what it is worth, I am ADD (and OCD) and am a sophomore at teh University of Michigan now, doing well. I do find college VERY VERY difficult without medication, but that all depends on the person. It is medical school that I'm beginning to worry about surviving through. I think the most important thing is that your child learn good study skills prior to college and that he recieves a quality high school education. Make sure he knows the the world is his oyster, growing up, and that he enjoys learning. My psychiatrist is ADD and made it through medical school, my boyfriends mother is ADD and is the best psychologist in her field in the upper region of michigan. ADD people are often of above average intelligence, you just have to make sure ADD doesn't become a roadblock to education. You childs success in high school will be the best predicting factor in his success in college, but even the transiton form high schools structured methods to college's self-teaching methods can be hard. The first month or so of college, I seriosuly wanted to drop out. But now I'm getting straight A's (except for Astronomy...don't ask) and am quite happy with my education. This is probably way too much info, but just know that it all works out in the end.
Please read my post on the top of page one of the topics. You will see that it [I]is[/I] possible to go to college and earn good grades, but...it will be much easier for your child, if he is being treated for ADD. I wasn't. And in the college I attended, (Ohio State) they have special considerations for "learning impaired students." Don't make my mistake and assume that means slow learners, it means bi-polar and ADD. Unfortunately, I didn't know what my problem was, when I was in college, so I didn't qualify. In the program though, Math students are given ample time to do tests, unlike the 15 minutes I had to do 20 problems. Even with a calculator it was impossible for me. Also medication for the ADD will help tremendously with Essay tests.
Just be sure you tell the college about the problem up front.
I have an extremely bright child age 18 who was just diagnosed with ADD after flunkng out of college. He always did average in school but teachers always thought he could do better and wasn't living up to his potential. They constantly would say that he was the smartest student they ever had but was lazy, probably bored and unchallenged and would probably do very well in college where he would be challenged. In college he was unable to keep up with his assignments and now he is just starting on Adderall but he has to sit out a semseter of school before they let him back. Any suggestions or recommendations on how he should spend the next six months to make the most of it before he goes back to school?

R. Castro
ADD affects more Americans than any research poll can accurately measure. Many adults today have successfully learned to manage ADD. Some dont even know they have it until a doctor tells them. Both of my parents have been diagnosed with ADD, and they both finished college. They both have worked for the federal government for over 20 years. Personal experience has taught me that ADD is just another "style" of thinking. Many folks with ADD are exceptional thinkers with some type of artistic or inventive talent. Some ADDers have many talents and gifts which make them exceptional people. My parents are both happy living with their ADD. My father endured a terrible ordeal with meds in his late 40s, and is content today unmedicated. I was raised by these people, and I believe they do WELL. :D
I was just diagnosed, I'm a 32-year-old grad student. As an undergrad, I did great in classes that interested me, and terrible when I didn't care. My first semester I was 3.8 GPA. College was new to me and I cared. My second semester, the newness wore off and I was in the 2.0 range.

I changed schools, and I got all A's in the classes I loved, with C's and D's in the classes I hated. My new school had a "University Studies" major that didn't have a prescribed curriculum. I signed up so I didn't have to take the uninteresting classes. When I graduated, my cumulative GPA was 3.8!!

So to answer your question, college is a definite possibility. The key, at least for me, was to take the classes I wanted to take.

Another suggestion: I competed in debate, both in high school and undergrad. Many of my teammates were ADD (diagnosed or undiagnosed, like me). We gravitate toward debate because it's intense, self-directed competition and research. Debate rounds are so intense that there was no way I could think about anything else. I loved that feeling. I'm now a debate coach. This is one of the few activities that has held my interest all these years.

I don't know if debate will help other people's ADD children, but I encourage all parents & students to explore it. As "the coach," I'm more than happy to discuss the this further.

Good luck!!
[QUOTE=maria1710]I am sorry if this is a dumb question, but I don't know anything about ADD. However, my 10 yr old son is suspected of having ADD and he is being evaluated by a psychologist this month.
Just wondering what the future holds for a child with ADD. Are they able to go to college and succeed in a college environment? Are there professionals (ie doctors, lawyers, etc) that have ADD and that take meds for ADD?
My son has always been a very good student--particularly when it comes to taking standardized tests...his scores are phenomenal. If he has ADD, does he have a bright academic future?
Also, on a related topic, a co-worker with adult ADD told me that there is no way that my son has ADD if he can do so well on long, silent, standardized tests. She says an ADD person could not focus well enough in that type of environment. Any ideas as to how or why my son does better on standardized tests than in a regular class environment? Thank you for your input.[/QUOTE]

Ok, my son had every symptom but in the 1980's meds were not so common. My brother-in-law was diagnoised with it but his mom refused to medicate him.

Both survived it, my son is in college getting good grades and my brother-in-law went on to get a BA.

Neither took meds and they made it just fine.

Only thing I noticed they both had in common was that they took a couple of years extra to settle down to college compared to the average right out of high school into college person. And they both needed to find a passion rather than just go through the motions when it came to choosing a reason for college.
I have only recently been diagnosed. I feel like if I had known about my ADD, college would have been so much more enjoyable and productive for me. Instead, I ended up feeling like I was getting dumber and dumber each semester. It was a real self-esteem killer.

I look back on my past now with regret and anger. Yeah, I know I can still go back to college, but I feel like all that time and energy and money was just wasted the "first" time around.

I'm sure that now that I know about my disorder, and I'm on medication, and counseling, and if I made use of the ADD accomodations, I could do well. But I can't help feeling like I was cheated out of a very valuable chunk of my youth that I can never get back.

According to "Understanding Women with AD/HD" students with ADD typically experience:
1. Underacheivement and poor or inconsistent academic performance
2. Difficulty organizing academic and personal life
3. Problems with prioritizing and inconsistency with follow-through
4. Problems with identifying effective study strategies and implementing them independently
5. Forgetfulness
6. Procrastination, followed by frustration
7. Difficulty with reading and writing, both in terms of comprehension and perseverance of task
8. A pattern of using the pressure of the "11th hour" to start the assignment

I experienced ALL of these difficulties. Of course, when students are aware of their ADD, and take extra steps to deal with it, and shape their life around their ADD (medication, academic accomodations, behavior management counselling, etc.) these problems can be effectively diminished, if not overcome. Like I said, I was unaware of my ADD at the time. I had no help whatsoever.

I'd like to share another quote from that book: "When a person experiences repeated failure or perceives their performance as inadequate, their sense of autonomy and competency decreases, while feelings of being unable to control the surrounding environment increases. Once the perceived locus of control has shifted from internal to external, psychological well-being diminishes." I believe this is what happened to me.

It is so SO good that you are catching this disorder early in his development! It will save him years and years of disappointment and struggling. By the time he is college-aged, he should have the necessary skills to deal with his ADD, and the understanding of his own strengths and weaknesses to encourage him, rather than hold him back. I'm sure he will be an excellent college student, and you have nothing to worry about.
I have type 1 bipolar, ADD, OCD, and panic disorder. Yet somehow I finally am doing OK and I am in 5 drumlines of 5 groups and I got a 35 on the ACT (out of 36; less than 1000 kids nationwide get that). WITHOUT the other three and with just the ADD, I'd probably be doing even better.
Don't worry. All is not lost. Consider yourself lucky!! I definitely consider MYself lucky! ;)
Kristina :wave:
[QUOTE=Amy2838]8. A pattern of using the pressure of the "11th hour" to start the assignment
.[/QUOTE]



Arggghh--I hated that about myself. I SO wish I had been aware of ADD as a college student. I know I could have graduated sooner and be in a lot less debt now. I could never get started on a project until the last minute. I remember complaining that the university library should stay open later than midnight. As an adult, that's still a curse I struggle with...
[QUOTE=JT95]Arggghh--I hated that about myself. I SO wish I had been aware of ADD as a college student. I know I could have graduated sooner and be in a lot less debt now. I could never get started on a project until the last minute. I remember complaining that the university library should stay open later than midnight. As an adult, that's still a curse I struggle with...[/QUOTE]

Don't worry about that trait; it's very common. My daughter has it but she is doing great in college...it's just her style, I guess.
[COLOR=Black][SIZE=2]Hi, I`m trish, and [COLOR=Red]i was dionagsed with ADHD[/COLOR] when i was 13yrs old, I am now 20yrs old. (I was also a pretty serve case at that) Having quit school in yr 8 and lefted home etc, I had no were to go but back to mums, and she would not have in there unless i took my medication, which i did not like because it was speed. But after getting over that, and got help with my problems, I return to do my 10yr via correspondace, and then attended tafe, and since then I have completed Cert III and IV in Community Services, and on the 16th of Dec, I applied for universty and today i received a letter from ECU asking if i would like a scholarship! The only problem i feel that people with sincere ADHD, ADD are looked down on within the community, as people perceive them as druggies, but if we were not to be medicated people would think we were on drugs.

But the way i see it if theres a will theres a way!

I am also located in Australia.[/SIZE][/COLOR]
[QUOTE=nateislate]I was just diagnosed, I'm a 32-year-old grad student. As an undergrad, I did great in classes that interested me, and terrible when I didn't care. My first semester I was 3.8 GPA. College was new to me and I cared. My second semester, the newness wore off and I was in the 2.0 range.

I changed schools, and I got all A's in the classes I loved, with C's and D's in the classes I hated. My new school had a "University Studies" major that didn't have a prescribed curriculum. I signed up so I didn't have to take the uninteresting classes. When I graduated, my cumulative GPA was 3.8!!

So to answer your question, college is a definite possibility. The key, at least for me, was to take the classes I wanted to take.

Another suggestion: I competed in debate, both in high school and undergrad. Many of my teammates were ADD (diagnosed or undiagnosed, like me). We gravitate toward debate because it's intense, self-directed competition and research. Debate rounds are so intense that there was no way I could think about anything else. I loved that feeling. I'm now a debate coach. This is one of the few activities that has held my interest all these years.

I don't know if debate will help other people's ADD children, but I encourage all parents & students to explore it. As "the coach," I'm more than happy to discuss the this further.

Good luck!![/QUOTE] What are you majoring in? Just curious
actually being able to sit there is an incinuation of not having ADD. When i was diagnosed when i was a child, mum told me the story heh, anywho she was talking about how i had had the doctor fooled, because i just sat there the whole time patiently. Most people tend to thing that ADD cant sit stil and thats not entirely the case. maybe your son is more like me and finds things like tests interesting. i never had a problem with tests. of course i had the problem with studying, whenever id study for a test my mind would go blank during the test. learned to cope by not studying and learning as much as possible when i could, so far it works, not on any meds just coping ATM, but i still maintain a 3.0 GPA.

I personally never had a problem sitting still for a long time, but then again because im not moving dont mean my mind isnt racing, when im sitting still there are so many thoughts rushing through my head its easy to get lost.

Just my 2 cents. thank you for listening to my speil
My son started on medication in the 5th grade when he had a very strict teacher who would not believe there was such a thing as ADD. Before that he was always considered the dummy of the class, none of the other kids ever wanted him in their group when they had group assignments. He started off middle school with medication and quickly became established as one of the smartest kids in the school. Now he is in high school and is doing very well, even taking AP classes. This is not an advertisement for medication as some kids can do well without it but just another story to show that ADD does not have to get in the way of doing well.
Hi. I am new to this board too. I was recently diagnosed with adult ADD. Apparently I've had ADD all my life. I too did well on standardized tests. Anyway, I am now a college student and have been able to maintain a 4.0 GPA. It certainly is possible for your son to attend college and to be very successful in whatever he chooses to do. It does take some extra effort-(and a very detailed daily planner!), but there is no reason why he should let ADD prevent him from continuing his education. He sounds like a caring, interested student. Best of luck to you both.
[QUOTE=aronoth]

I personally never had a problem sitting still for a long time, but then again because im not moving dont mean my mind isnt racing, when im sitting still there are so many thoughts rushing through my head its easy to get lost.

[/QUOTE]


While I might fidget with my fingertips, sitting still as a kid and now was never much of an issue with me either. I could sit still and quiet really well. I remember strangers commenting to my mother how quiet and behaved i was at places like waiting rooms. Hell, I had so many thoughts and daydreams bouncing around in my head it was entertaining just sitting there still. :p
I went from basically being on the brink of expulsion to getting a full schoalrship and graduating from Boston College. ADHD doesnt mean your stupid, you just cannot focus like others. It doesnt make a person smarter but it does settle me down enough to be able to write a strong paper or sit an exam, or in my case have dinner at the table
College definitely!!! There is an awesome book available with colleges that provide ADD support to students.....The Peterson Guide to Colleges with
Learning Disability Support or something like that.....lists all schools that offer
support to ADD/LD students.....we have a 17 yo daughter diagnosed with ADD
last year.....she is planning to attend a local community college next year and we are looking forward to sending her off to a 4 year school to complete
her degree after that....she is very bright and has had a less than supportive
time in HS but all indications are that college is much more ADD friendly..... :
Hi:
In short, College is definitely a possibility!!!!!
I was recently diagnosed with ADD at the age of 27, shortly after completing law school. My ADD symptoms have always been there, but I was always considered the "smart one", so it never occurred to me that the issues that I was dealing with wasn't normal! I did very well on standardized tests....always finishing early. I would also do very well on projects and papers, but would always leave them to the last minute....thinking that I just one of the those people who worked best under pressure. In speaking with my Dr., it appears that I just catered my study habits to compensate for the issues that I was having. So, I did well in both college and grad school with unmedicated/undiagnosed ADD. (I also had several friends with diagnosed ADD that also did well in Law school).
Since the diagnosis (Nov 2004), I have been working with my doctor to prepare for the bar exam... I chose to take the medication route. For me, the difference is unbelievable.
Just thought that I would add my 2 cents! Best of Luck!! :)





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