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Why is asthma worse at night asthma
If you have allergic asthma, it might be something in the room where you sleep. Dust can be a real problem - this would be dust in the carpet, in your bedding...I'm not saying that you might be a terrible housekeeper, just that it takes a lot of work to have a dust free bedroom! Cats would be another potential problem. Both of these would be more problematic at night because you spend a fair amount of time in that one room.

Acid Reflux disease (GERD) can cause problems at night because you are laying down - allows the acid to be more of a problem.

Think about anything else that might be triggering you - spending that much time in the same room with one of your triggers - potentially a huge problem.

Also - for most people, asthma tends to be worse at night because our lungs constrict a bit in the middle of the night - something to do with the circadian rhythm.

You might be able to experiment with your meds a bit so that you have the strongest amount in your body during the night.
my asthma is horrid at night! I'll be up allllll night long coughing uncontrollably. So the doc told me it is because of the temperature decrease at night that causes this. I was given a cough medicine to take at night that also helps me to stay asleep. I also turn up the heat because any cold breeze causes that asthma to act up.
Since being diagnosed with a sleep disorder, I have learned that acid reflux and asthma are sometimes symptoms (as are anxiety, depression, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes) of a sleeping disorder . If the sleeping disorder is treated, the symptoms diminish or go away completely.

This may sound too good to be true but it isn't...there is a considerable amount of clinical/medical research going on regarding sleeping disorders and it's hard to keep up with the reading. Although I discovered my acid reflux cure by accident (my sleep doctor told me that my history of ppi's was a red flag to him that it was likely I had a sleep disorder), I learned about the asthma connection in my sleep disorder support group. Some of the members experienced a noticable improvement in their asthma symptoms once they were treated for apnea but they were told by their sleep specialists this would most likely happen...

I have since read that they used to think poor air quality contributed to asthma since children in the inner cities had high incidences of this condition. Since then, they've discovered that children living in similar conditions due not have asthma IF they eat a Mediterranean diet. In other words, children who live in the inner city are poor and don't have a diet rich in fruits and vegetables...and it's a diet that's rich in fruits and vegetables that reduces incidences of breathing problems.

Bethsheba

Few doctors have so much as a basic understanding of apnea...for that reason I recommend learning about it on one's own. My doctors overlooked my symptoms for years. Finally, I insisted on seeing a specialist, who as I mentioned, took one look at my ppi hx and said I was a candidate for a sleep study.
I do not have a sleep disorder, but I have found that my asthma feels much worse when I do not get enough sleep. The reverse is also true, when I get enough hours of sleep, my lungs do feel better.
But you are right, it can feel worse at night and sometimes the asthma disrupts the sleep as much as the sleep can disrupt the asthma.
I hope you sort it all out,
Andrea
[QUOTE=acprivra;3390539]I do not have a sleep disorder, but I have found that my asthma feels much worse when I do not get enough sleep. The reverse is also true, when I get enough hours of sleep, my lungs do feel better.
But you are right, it can feel worse at night and sometimes the asthma disrupts the sleep as much as the sleep can disrupt the asthma.
I hope you sort it all out,
Andrea[/QUOTE]


Andrea,

I'm not saying that a sleep disorder disrupts asthma...I'm saying that many people with asthma have (unidentifed) sleep disorders and if you treat the sleep disorder the asthma improves. I will not get into the physical reasons for this but some medical professionals who specialize in the treatment of asthma think that the more you look for sleep apnea in patients with asthma, the more you find it, and that people who are having problems with asthma should have sleep studies done.

Again, research into the correlation between asthma and sleeping disorders is relatively new...it was in 1988 when a doctor first realized that treating sleep apnea reduced or eliminated severe asthma symptoms in his patients. Since then more studies have been undertaken.

By the way, how do you know that you don't have a sleeping disorder? Most people who have these disorders (about 20 percent of the public) have no idea they have this condition. And those who suspect some type of problem see a family doctor 17 or more times and a specialist 9 or more times before they get a diagnosis.

Bethsheba
Hi Beth :)

I want to have a sleep study done now that I have read your super informative posts.

Did you have or do you have asthma? Did the CPAP help?

What were your symptoms?

Thanks

Vanessa;)
[QUOTE=bethsheba;3390718]
By the way, how do you know that you don't have a sleeping disorder? Most people who have these disorders (about 20 percent of the public) have no idea they have this condition. And those who suspect some type of problem see a family doctor 17 or more times and a specialist 9 or more times before they get a diagnosis.

Bethsheba[/QUOTE]

Bethsheba,
I guess you're right, I should have said I have not been diagnosed with a sleep disorder. I guess I was just trying to point out the differences I can feel in my asthma with just a little more good rest, but I think I understand what you mean. My asthma doctor mentioned something about sleeping when I first saw him but related it to asthma by simply stating the link between the two but didn't explore it further with me. Now I am kind of curious to find out if I have any serious sleeping problems (though lack of sleep or sleep issues seem to be ineveitable when you are a full time student).

Thanks for the clarification,
Andrea
Your body is working hard all day to fight off whatever it believes to be a harmful substance (allergy, etc.). At night, when at rest, our bodies relax and aren't working as hard to fight off that substance, so the asthma flairs up. Could be one explanation among the many great ones listed here.





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