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I just ran across this whil searching for something about pore-clogging ingredients. It has some really good information, especially about misleading labels. I can't post thw whole thing here, so I cut out some bits so it would fit.

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration
FDA Consumer magazine
May-June 1998

This article originally appeared in the May-June 1998 FDA Consumer. The version below is from a reprint of the original article and contains revisions made in May 1998 and August 2000.

[B]Clearing Up Cosmetic Confusion
by Carol Lewis[/B]

The [B]regulatory requirements [/B] governing the sale of cosmetics are not as stringent as those that apply to other FDA-regulated products. Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD&C) Act, cosmetics and their ingredients are not required to undergo approval before they are sold to the public. Generally, FDA regulates these products after they have been released to the marketplace. This means that manufacturers may use any ingredient or raw material, except for color additives and a few prohibited substances, to market a product without a government review or approval.

But some regulations do apply to cosmetics. In addition to the FD&C Act, the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act requires an ingredient declaration on every cosmetic product offered for sale to consumers. In addition, these regulations require that ingredients be listed in descending order of quantity. Water, for example, accounts for the bulk of most skin-care products, which is why it usually appears first on these products.

Although companies are not required to substantiate performance claims or conduct safety testing, if safety has not been substantiated, the product's label must read "WARNING: The safety of this product has not been determined."

FDA's challenge comes in proving that a product is harmful under conditions of use or that it is improperly labeled. Only then can the agency take action to remove adulterated or misbranded products from the marketplace.

The FD&C Act defines [B]cosmetics[/B] as articles intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. This definition includes skin-care creams, lotions, powders and sprays, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup, permanent waves, hair colors, deodorants, baby products, bath oils, bubble baths, and mouthwashes, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product.

Products that intend to treat or prevent disease, or otherwise affect structure or function of the human body are considered drugs. [B]Cosmetics that make therapeutic claims are regulated as drugs and cosmetics, and must meet the labeling requirements for both.[/B] A good way to tell if you're buying a cosmetic that is also regulated as a drug is to see if the first ingredient listed is an "active ingredient." The active ingredient is the chemical that makes the product effective, and the manufacturer must have proof that it's safe for its intended use. For products that are both drugs and cosmetics, the regulations require that active ingredients be listed first on these products, followed by the list of cosmetic ingredients in order of decreasing predominance.

Examples of products that are both cosmetics and drugs are dandruff shampoos, fluoride toothpastes, antiperspirant deodorants, and foundations and tanning preparations that contain sunscreen.

Before products with both a cosmetic and drug classification can be marketed, they must be scientifically proven safe and effective for their therapeutic claims. If they are not, FDA considers them to be misbranded and can take regulatory action.

The ingredient list on a cosmetic container is the only place where a consumer can readily find out the truth about what he or she is buying. Consumers can check the listing to identify substances they wish to avoid. And becoming familiar with what cosmetics contain can help counter some of the alluring appeal showcased elsewhere on the product.

Consumers can, however, obtain specific information about a cosmetic ingredient in various references, such as the [B]International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary and Handbook, published by the Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association, available at many public libraries.[/B] FDA recognizes the association as a reliable source of facts on substances that have been identified as cosmetic ingredients, as well as their definitions and trade names.

Cosmetic ingredient declaration regulations apply only to retail products intended for home use. Cosmetic samples and products used exclusively by beauticians in salons are not required to include the ingredient declaration. However, these products must state the distributor, list the content's quantity, and include all necessary warning statements.

[B]Almost all cosmetics can cause allergic reactions in certain individuals.[/B] Often the first sign of a reaction is a mild redness and irritation. There is no list of ingredients that can be guaranteed not to cause allergic reactions, so consumers who are prone to allergies should pay careful attention to what they use on their skin.

Nearly one-quarter of the people questioned in FDA's 1994 cosmetics survey responded "yes" to having suffered an allergic reaction to personal care products, including moisturizers, foundations, and eye shadows.

FDA has tried to establish official definitions for the use of certain terms such as "natural" and "hypoallergenic," but its regulations were overturned in court. So companies can use them on cosmetic labels to mean anything or nothing at all. Most of the terms have considerable market value in promoting cosmetic products to consumers, but dermatologists say they have very little medical meaning.

Some of the more common terms that consumers should be aware of include:

Natural: implies that ingredients are extracted directly from plants or animal products as opposed to being produced synthetically. There is no basis in fact or scientific legitimacy to the notion that products containing natural ingredients are good for the skin.
Hypoallergenic: implies that products making this claim are less likely to cause allergic reactions. There are no prescribed scientific studies required to substantiate this claim. Likewise, the terms "dermatologist-tested," "sensitivity tested," "allergy tested," or "nonirritating" carry no guarantee that they won't cause skin reactions.
Alcohol Free: traditionally meant that certain cosmetic products do not contain ethyl alcohol (or grain alcohol). Cosmetic products, however, may contain other alcohols, such as cetyl, stearyl, cetearyl, or lanolin, which are known as fatty alcohols.
Fragrance Free: implies that a cosmetic product so labeled has no perceptible odor. Fragrance ingredients may be added to a fragrance-free cosmetic to mask any offensive odor originating from the raw materials used, but in a smaller amount than is needed to impart a noticeable scent.
Noncomodogenic: suggests that products do not contain common pore-clogging ingredients that could lead to acne.
Shelf Life (Expiration Date): the amount of time for which a cosmetic product is good under normal conditions of storage and use, depending on the product's composition, packaging, preservation, etc. Expiration dates are, for practical purposes, a rule of thumb, and a product may expire long before that date if it has not been stored and handled properly.
Cruelty Free: implies that products have not been tested on animals. Most ingredients used in cosmetics have at some point been tested on animals so consumers may want to look for "no new animal testing," to get a more accurate indication.

Since the cosmetics industry often produces new, reworked versions of old ingredients, a wise consumer will take the time to read the labels to know what's in a product and how to use it safely. After all, consumers are likely to try other products with the same recognizable names. Once you have all the information, you can begin to make your own decisions about what products work best for you.





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