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Brain & Nervous System Disorders Message Board


Brain & Nervous System Disorders Board Index


oh,congrats on being able to have this coiled onyx,really,this is by FAR the least invasive and will allow the best recovery in minimal time.this really IS fantastic news compared to the only other alternative,crainiotomy and deep brain surgery.this really is great news onyx and i am so happy for you being able to actually do things this way.it is really huge for you.

despite the screy crap,things went rather well for me when i had mine.after the coiling,i spent one night just for observation in the ICU and was very lucky to have wonderful nurses who when my legs went into hidious spasm(spinal cord injury crap,i knew this was going to happen before it did and had prepared for it with my IRs nurse)i had two nurses going up and down my back(this was a first for me,the spasms started in my upper back and went all the way down both legs,just nasty)and the other ran for the valium that we had planned ahead for and had standing by at all times.once they did that things were fine for me.

the overall process onyx is really not as bad as you are probably thinking right now,its mostly that fear of the unknown that drives us crazy.i hadn't really know anyone who had been thru this before(although my cousin had one about 8 or 9 years before mine but that was long ago,but she was somewhat helpful)but things went without a hitch as far as the coiling itself was concerned,and yes iwas knocked out for mine too,which is actually a good thing as you just go to sleep and wake up in recovery.

mine was actually coiled on nov 4th 2005.i had my follow up angio(they do this at the one year mark just to make certain all coils have assimilated into the aneurysm)last nov,and he couldn't even detect any part of it.all this means is the coiling did as it was supposed to do,it fills up with clots that eventually blend the whole aneurysm into one little glob.they know things are good when it doesn't 'light up" on the screen.this just means no part of the aneurysm has any blood flow so it blends into the back ground upon the angio and the introduction of that dye into the arterial bloodflow.its a good thing when they cannot actually detect any part and means it is 'filled' completely and taken completely out of the normal bloodflow.that was such a huge freakin relief for me.they ended up only using two long coils(they look like a long piece of wire?but once they actually hit the aneurysm they will let the stiffness out and they become like little snakes and just suddenly start spinning around into little coils,kind of like a brillo pad configuration?) they had tried three i guess but that third one was just too much and it herniated out of the aneurysm so they left it out.

i DO remember waking up with left sided head pain,the side the coiling was on?but i get migranes from just the dye anyway so i don't really know where this came from for sure.but honestly,all you do is tell the recovery nurse you are having pain and they will take care of you extremely well with MS and other meds they use in recovery to minimize things like shivering that you can sometimes get from the anesthesia?but they DO have a heap of those warm cozy blankies at the ready,in the warmer all the time.i LOVE those heated blankies.

the ICU nurses also will take care of any post op pain too.the only problem i had was from the femoral site since they leave the shunt in for about 6 hours post op to help release any air and dissipate any blood from the aneurysm coiling itself.i also had pain from that but that is me.the nurse told me in recovery since this really was MY biggest source of pain,that she,in all her years of doing this had never had anyone ever really complain of pain in that particular area,but with all my seriously screwed up body systems from the SCI,well things very unheard of always seem to be happening to me.but you should not have any real pain from that areaat all.i think overall,you will be just fine as far as having any big pain issues since they are continuously medicating you.if you have any pain at all,just tell the nurses,there will probably be orders written for dilaudid.they did also give me some to take home too since you can have post coiling headaches for a bit.mine dissapated after about two weeks completely and they had wayyy tapered off before that time.

my actual recovery from the coiling itself was pretty quick really,but because of all the ramifications having to do with my spinal cord damage and the RSD and other neuro crap i have,things in other areas were a bit severe for awhile,but like i said,you do not have an SCI,so in your case.i would think recovery should be pretty quick really.considering just what this procedure is really doing,it is actually pretty benign compared to other procedures i have had to have.its just that 'going into your brain' factor that kind of freaks you out.yes,there are some risks but you actually face that with any surgery.as long as you feel good about the neuro IR that is doing your coiling and discuss any real concerns with the nurse that will be setting up your procedure,i think everything will go just fine for you onyx,really.its a pretty straight forward procedure.i was very lucky in that i had one of the best neuro IRs in the state i live in,he is the big trouble shooter guy that other IRs call in for the tough cases.from what his nurse told me,no aneurysm is actually considered to be 'uncoilable' til Dr madison says it's not.her exact words to me over the phone one day,so i knew i was in the best possible hands.i am sure you will have a great one too.just voice ANY concerns you have to either him or his nurse.my IRs nurse was really fantastic and very empathetic to my situation and all the things that just had to be in place for me.just keep like a notebook or piece of paper and a pen in one particular spot like for me it was my kitchen counter?and when you think of ANY real question you need to ask IMMEDITELY go to that paper and write them down asap or you will,if you are anything like me,forget what it was later.this has always worked well for me since i started doing it when i was getting ready for my spinal cord surgery.you live and learn.

as far as the stent,i never had one and i really don't know anything about them or why they would really be needed,for what purpose?i would suppose to keep an artery open?thats all i can think of.maybe if your aneurysm is in one of the smaller arteries this may be whats needed?sorry i can't really help you there onyx.the one thing you will be doing post op and for the rest of your life is taking baby aspirin.this really kind of scared me for a couple of reasons.my stomach does not tolerate aspirin at ALL.it usually would burn a whole in my stomach and then eventually come back up,but those enteric coated ones?fantastic really,i have had absolutely no stomach issues since i was started on them.this also lessens your risk of developing ulcers too since it is not released inside your stomach but the GI tract.

they will have you start like plavix or coumadin before(and for a bit after too) since they DO NOT want clotty blood during the procedure.i know this goes totally against what we are always told before any surgery but they actually WANT your blood thinned for this.i personally had some non stop bleed issues from the shunt/femoral site but once they removed that shunt at six hours post op,everything stopped and i was just fine.like i said,my body is a real mess anyways so who knows,this may not even be an issue for you.everyone is just soo very different in all things ya know?but since you do not have my freak show issues,things i am sure,will go much more smoothly for you than they did for me.overall,mine went pretty darn well,considering what they had to work with,lol.

i think i covered all your questions but if i left something out or you have any new ones,you know how to find me.good luck with this onyx and honestly,the coiling really IS the best,least invasive and the way to do this without causing actual damage to any part of your brain.look at this as a really great thing.the other option really scared the crap outta me,i was actually releived when this option was found not to be one for my particular aneurysm.it just took that choice off the table completely and i didn;t have to even deal with it or think about it.keep me posted hon,good luck,i know you will do just fine and this will all just be a blip on the screen by this time next year.hang in there,this too shall pass,Marcia





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