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High Cholesterol Message Board


High Cholesterol Board Index


[QUOTE=hilery79]My husband found out the results of his blood tests today. His Dr. was concerned about how high his trigs were. He was started on 20mg of Lipitor. Here are the test results:

Trig: 425
Total Chol: 257
HDL: 35
LDL: The test said the LDL was not calculated because triglyceride levels greater than 400 invalidate LDL results.

I realize that he really needs to get these #'s under control. Is there anything else he can do to help lower his triglycerides? He already eats a fairly low fat diet and exercises(which he has done for the last several months). Also, where should his triglyceride levels be at? His Dr. said his total chol should be under 200, but I don't think he said what his trig level should be.
Thanks so much,
Hilery[/QUOTE]

The biggest concern I see is the much elevated triglyceride level (should be <150 mg/dl, optimal <100 mg/dl) combined with a low HDL level (in men, should be >40 mg/dl, optimal >50 mg/dl). The triglyceride/HDL ratio has been shown to be a much better predictor of heart disease risk than total cholesterol or LDL levels which seem to be the only thing that doctors focus on. A trig/HDL ratio of 3.0 or less is desirable, with a ratio of less than 2.0 being optimal or very low CHD risk. The higher the ratio, the higher the risk. In your husbands case his ratio is 425/35 or 12.1 which is very high. If he has other CHD risk factors (smoking, diabetes, overweight, high bloodpressure, etc) then his overall risk is much higher. He really needs to get those triglycerides down.

Elevated triglycerides are usually the result of a diet that is too high in sugars and starches. Any excess of these rapidly digested carbohydrates enter the bloodstream as sugar and get converted to triglycerides in the liver. Even fruit consumption can have a very negative effect on triglyceride levels, especially in men. In my experience and research, the best way to get those triglycerides down is to cut way back on the consumption of dietary carbohydrate, in particular the sugar, fruit (juice especially which is really concentrated sugar with little to no fiber), and starchy foods (bread, pastries, pasta, rice, potatoes, corn, etc.). Highly processed foods need to be shunned in favor of whole natural foods whenever possible.

Excercise will also help lower triglycerides by burning off that sugar before it can get converted to triglycerides and by increasing insulin sensitivity. However, in my experience, triglyceride levels are affected more by what's in the kitchen that what happens in the gym. Excercise is also recommended for raising HDL levels, but again, my experience is that what you eat has a signficant impact on HDL levels. And current dietary recommendations to eat less saturated fat run counter to raising HDL levels. Saturated fat (the natural kind found in meat, eggs, and dairy) tends to raise HDL levels. The saturated fat that needs to be avoided is that created through the partial hydrogenation process - and this stuff is found in virtually all processed foods - just read the labels and look for the words "partially hydrogenated". One of the problems with partially hydrogenated vegetable oil is that studies show that it tends to lower HDL levels while raising LDL levels further increasing CHD risk.

Fish oil is about the only supplement I recommend consistently. Fish/fish oil consumption is associated with lowering of triglyceride levels and raising HDL levels. Most peoples diets today are woefully low in Omega 3 essential fatty acids and fish and cod liver oils are an excellent source of these essential oils. One brand that I highly recommend due to its taste and quality control is Carlson's lemon flavored cod liver oil.
[QUOTE][QUOTE=hilery79]I realize that he really needs to get these #'s under control. Is there anything else he can do to help lower his triglycerides? He already eats a fairly low fat diet and exercises(which he has done for the last several months). Also, where should his triglyceride levels be at? His Dr. said his total chol should be under 200, but I don't think he said what his trig level should be.
Thanks so much,
Hilery[/QUOTE][/QUOTE]


My boyfriend's highest cholesterol was 320 at one time. He did all the stuff they recommend to lower your cholesterol but didn't help might. Dr. finally put him on Lipitor. Been on it for several years. The lowest he got down to was 195 while on Lipitor. I recently turned him onto Revival Soy which I'm taking for menopausal symptoms (no more hot flashes!) His cholesterol went down to 155 within 2 months and b/c the dr. did not wean him off of Lipitor quick enough, he started to have some problems with his liver. He is fine now and is weaning off of Lipitor. The dr. and his nutritionist did approve the Revival Soy and prefer him to be taking that vs. the Lipitor (he has been on a drug medical research program for another disorder so he is constantly being monitored).

Something you might want to check into.... :wave:





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