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High Cholesterol Message Board


High Cholesterol Board Index


[QUOTE=rahod][B]8/13/2001 BERLIN Bayer AG said Monday that its Baycol anti-cholesterol drug may be linked to 52 deaths, five days after Germany's biggest drug maker announced a voluntary recall of the drug.[/B][/QUOTE]
More current info: Baycol is linked to at least 100 fatal cases [COLOR=Blue][not 52] [/COLOR] of rhabdomyolysis and a high number of lawsuits [COLOR=Blue][11,000]. [/COLOR] Sales for Crestor were below analysts' expectations in 2002, and in early 2004, two major U.S. health insurers and the Swedish government announced it would [B]not[/B] reimburse patients using Crestor. Still, AstraZeneca has recently told analysts it is hoping to capture 20 percent of the $22 billion a year statin market.
March 4, 2004, a 39-year-old woman died of a muscle-destroying condition [rhabdomyolysis] linked to the controversial new anti-cholesterol drug Crestor.

Crestor won approval FDA in August, 2003 after a delay because of safety concerns: Seven cases of the potentially fatal, muscle-destroying condition called rhabdomyolysis occurred during studies involving patients on an 80-milligram dose. For that rare condition to pop up in clinical trials was unusual and particularly worrisome since another statin, Baycol, had been pulled off the market in 2001, linked to dozens of rhabdomyolysis-caused deaths worldwide. In studies, Crestor also was linked to some cases of kidney abnormalities not seen with other statins. Still, the FDA ultimately decided to approve Crestor, saying it appeared to be slightly more potent than other statins and thus may be important for some patients. To lower the risk of side effects, FDA recommended starting doses of 5 mg. to 10 mg, and said patients should never exceed 40 mg.
[QUOTE=heart44]More current info: Baycol is linked to at least 100 fatal cases [COLOR=Blue][not 52] [/COLOR] of rhabdomyolysis and a high number of lawsuits [COLOR=Blue][11,000]. [/COLOR] Sales for Crestor were below analysts' expectations in 2002, and in early 2004, two major U.S. health insurers and the Swedish government announced it would [B]not[/B] reimburse patients using Crestor. Still, AstraZeneca has recently told analysts it is hoping to capture 20 percent of the $22 billion a year statin market.
March 4, 2004, a 39-year-old woman died of a muscle-destroying condition [rhabdomyolysis] linked to the controversial new anti-cholesterol drug Crestor.

Crestor won approval FDA in August, 2003 after a delay because of safety concerns: Seven cases of the potentially fatal, muscle-destroying condition called rhabdomyolysis occurred during studies involving patients on an 80-milligram dose. For that rare condition to pop up in clinical trials was unusual and particularly worrisome since another statin, Baycol, had been pulled off the market in 2001, linked to dozens of rhabdomyolysis-caused deaths worldwide. In studies, Crestor also was linked to some cases of kidney abnormalities not seen with other statins. [B]Still, the FDA ultimately decided to approve Crestor, saying it appeared to be slightly more potent than other statins and thus may be important for some patients. To lower the risk of side effects, FDA recommended starting doses of 5 mg. to 10 mg, and said patients should never exceed 40 mg[/B].[/QUOTE]

So.....what does Crestor have to do with Baycol? I repeat....Crestor is SAFE and will not be pulled off the market..period..end of story. Read the [B]BOLD[/B] print.





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