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High Cholesterol Message Board


High Cholesterol Board Index


Taking Niaspan with food; or an aspirin half an hour before taking Niaspan will help decrease the Side effects - also taking it right before bed will help as well - but yes - If side effects do not subside after a week or 2 - you will definately want to tell your Dr; as well as not increasing your dose to 1000 mg/day until your body gets used to it and the side effects subside.

Unfortunately - virtually everyone Flushes with high doses of Niacin either Niaspan (prescription) or the OTC Niacin.

The "No Flush" or "SLO" Niacin - while a nice idea - contains no usable Niacin. It may benefit something else - but does your lipid values no good.

The Time-release Niacin (the OTC stuff) while beneficial - can cause Hepatotoxicity - so you've got to watch LFT's just like Statins -

This is not so much of an issue with Niaspan - part of the reason they were granted a Patent I believe.

The immediate release Niacin (the OTC stuff) causes no LFT issues.
Yes - That's the No Flush Niacin I'm talking about - It contains no usable niacin - when metabolized - no Nictonic acid is released.

I've got a paper somewhere on it -

Found it -

Varying Cost and Free Nicotinic Acid Content in Over-the-Counter
Niacin Preparations for Dyslipidemia
C. Daniel Meyers, MD; Molly C. Carr, MD; Sang Park, PhD; and John D. Brunzell, MD

Abstract -

Background: Nicotinic acid is an effective treatment for dyslipidemia,
but the content of over-the-counter niacin is not federally
regulated. As a result, patients may use preparations of over-thecounter
niacin that do not contain free nicotinic acid.

Objective: To characterize the types, costs, and free nicotinic
acid content of over-the-counter niacin preparations and to review
literature on the use of over-the-counter niacin for dyslipidemia.

Data Sources: Commonly used over-the-counter niacin preparations
(500-mg tablets or capsules) from the 3 categories of
immediate-release, sustained-release, and no-flush were purchased
at health food stores and pharmacies and from Internetbased
vitamin companies. Pertinent literature on the use of overthe-
counter niacin was obtained by searching PubMed.

Measurements: For each preparation studied, the monthly cost
of therapy (at 2000 mg/d) and the free nicotinic acid content
(quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography) were
reported.

Data Synthesis: On average, immediate-release niacin preparations
cost $7.10 per month, sustained-release preparations cost
$9.75 per month, and no-flush preparations cost $21.70 per
month. The average content of free nicotinic acid was 520.4 mg
for immediate-release niacin, 502.6 mg for sustained-release niacin,
and 0 for no-flush niacin.

Conclusions: No-flush preparations of over-the-counter niacin
contain no free nicotinic acid and should not be used to treat
dyslipidemia. Over-the-counter sustained-release niacin contains
free nicotinic acid, but some brands are hepatotoxic. Immediaterelease
niacin contains free nicotinic acid and is the least expensive
form of over-the-counter niacin.

Ann Intern Med. 2003;139:996-1002. [url]www.annals.org[/url]
I'm still confused. If inositol hexanicotinate does nothing, then how were the Europeans able to get successful results with it? Ordinarily, I use immediate-release over the counter niacin, which I've had much success with. However, I occassionally take inositol hexanicotinate. My brand is Twinlab, and the label states that it contains 640mg niacin and 160mg inositol.
I'd like to see the papers where the Europeans got the benefits with it.

In your case - the immediate release Niacin is what gives you the benefit. Consider yourself one of the lucky ones - Not many folks can tolerate the immediate release niacin.

BTW - you taught me something today - I'd never heard of the "Pauling Method" for lowering Lp(a) I'll have to do some more research on it.

Like the Post above - Just saw it - THanks for getting my back.
[QUOTE=lipidprofiler]


Measurements: For each preparation studied, the monthly cost
of therapy (at 2000 mg/d) and the free nicotinic acid content
(quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography) were
reported.

Data Synthesis: [b]On average, immediate-release niacin preparations
cost $7.10 per month, sustained-release preparations cost
$9.75 per month, and no-flush preparations cost $21.70 per
month.[/b] The average content of free nicotinic acid was 520.4 mg
for immediate-release niacin, 502.6 mg for sustained-release niacin,
and 0 for no-flush niacin.

Conclusions: No-flush preparations of over-the-counter niacin
contain no free nicotinic acid and should not be used to treat
dyslipidemia. Over-the-counter sustained-release niacin contains
free nicotinic acid, but some brands are hepatotoxic. Immediaterelease
niacin contains free nicotinic acid and is the least expensive
form of over-the-counter niacin.

[/QUOTE]

I'll make one tiny addition to the cost somparisons that lipidprofiler gave: the cost of the same 2000 mg./day taken as prescription NIASPAN is $130/month.





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