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High Cholesterol Message Board


High Cholesterol Board Index


I have read that total cholesterol under 180 could be unhealthy.
My cousin is 38 and on 5 mg. Crestor and now her total cholesterol is 140, HDL-47 LDL-78. I don't know what her count was before the Crestor, but I was wondering if she really needed the Crestor in the first place.
I accidentally found her blood tests and looked at them, and I don't know if I want to ask her what her count was before the medication.
I did tell her that there are lawsuits pending because of Crestor and when she told her doctor she didn't want to take it, the doctor said "who are you going to listen to, your cousin or me."
My cousin does not want to take Crestor, but she is afraid to stand up to the doctor.
As I have posted before, I lowered mine from total-300 to total-172 on plant sterols and Policosinal, so I told my cousin now I don't have high cholesterol any longer without drugs, so go tell your doctor that!
Anyway, any comments regarding low total cholesterol would be appreciated!
Thanks!
I researched my question more thoroughly and found that optimal total cholesterol levels should be around 200. Low total cholesterol levels like 140 may increase the risk of stroke.

I answered my own question, but thought I would post the info for
everyone.

If there are any other risks for low cholesterol levels that anyone has knowledge of, please post them.

Thanks so much!
[QUOTE=jacal5]I researched my question more thoroughly and found that optimal total cholesterol levels should be around 200. Low total cholesterol levels like 140 may increase the risk of stroke.
![/QUOTE]
It is always helpful to post the source of your research so others may also look it up.

Here is an interesting report on the subject:

[quote]
[b]Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Do Not Increase Risk of Stroke[/b]

New York (MedscapeWire) Oct 4 People with high cholesterol who are receiving lipid-lowering drugs are not at an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study presented at the American Neurological Association's 126th annual meeting in Chicago.

While many people take statins and other cholesterol-lowering drugs to decrease their risks of heart attack and stroke, there has been some concern that lowering one's cholesterol too much may actually increase the risk of one particularly lethal form of stroke.

It's known that low cholesterol is associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ICH accounts for only 10%-15% of all strokes, but it causes death in 40%-50% of those who have one.

Until now, no one has shown whether lowering one's cholesterol levels with medication would increase the risk of a brain hemorrhage. "What we found was the exact opposite: Patients [who were on cholesterol-lowering drugs], in fact, had less risk of having the ICH," says lead researcher Daniel Woo, MD, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Cincinnati, in Ohio.

Woo and colleagues studied the medication history of 190 patients with ICH and compared them with 370 control subjects who did not have this type of stroke.

"Whatever causes a patient to have low cholesterol is probably what gives him the increased risk of hemorrhage," says Woo. "The use of cholesterol-lowering drugs does not give you the increased risk of ICH that someone with normal or low cholesterol has."

Ralph Sacco, MD, a spokesperson for the American Stroke Association, says that the findings are encouraging in that they offer additional support for the use of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

"There is a small perceived fear in the past that lipid-lowering drugs may increase the risk of a brain hemorrhage," says Sacco, associate chairman of neurology at Columbia University in New York City. "But this study provides reassurance that these drugs are safe and do not raise the risk of any kind of stroke."[/quote]

Another:

[QUOTE]Beneficial in Stroke Prevention too?
Recent evidence suggests that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors may reduce stroke risk despite the lack of a clear association between serum cholesterol levels and stroke.[1] This discrepancy is as yet unexplained. A 31% risk reduction in nonfatal strokes was seen in patients treated with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors compared with patients not receiving this treatment, in a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.[16] Pravastatin reduced fatal and nonfatal strokes by 20 to 30% compared with placebo in 2 clinical trials.[12,13] However, no treatment effect was seen with regard to fatal strokes. This may be because of differences in the pathophysiology of these 2 types of stroke.[1][/QUOTE]
Let me throw a thought in sideways. Lipoproteins in general have a certain "gluiness" that is useful in cell wall repair and the like. Unfortunaltely the gluinesss leads to conditions like plaque where too much glue gums up the works.

Perhaps the lack of enough of this gluiness predisposes to arterial wall bursting inappropriately. A blood blister on your lip, a bloody nose...or an intercranial hemorrhage.
Cholesterol obviosly serves many useful purposes and I am sure there is a practical limit below which one cannot go safely. Somewhere between zero and 140 presumably.
[QUOTE=jacal5]I researched my question more thoroughly and found that optimal total cholesterol levels should be around 200. Low total cholesterol levels like 140 may increase the risk of stroke.

I answered my own question, but thought I would post the info for
everyone.

If there are any other risks for low cholesterol levels that anyone has knowledge of, please post them.

Thanks so much![/QUOTE]

jacal5,

Low total cholesterol levels have been shown in many studies to be related to a much greater cancer risk. Very rare does a person with cancer, have an elevated cholesterol. Cancer seems to eat into our cholesterol reserves, as it does potassium and other minerals. It seems if heart disease doesn't get us something else will.. Maybe I should become a "Beach Bum" like others on this board suggested.

Below is a quote..

References:
A J McMichael, et al. Dietary and endogenous cholesterol and human cancer. Epidemiol Rev. 1984; 6: 192

In a study from the USA published in 1990, changes in blood cholesterol over time were studied in patients with colon cancer. The doctors found that there had been an average thirteen percent decline in blood cholesterol levels in the ten years prior to diagnosis of the cancer compared with an average increase of two percent in the control group. Both those with the cancer and those free from it had similar blood cholesterol levels initially. It is possible that the decline in blood cholesterol levels was a result of the cancer, not the cause of it, but this is ruled out by the investigators. They compare cholesterol studies with apparently contrary findings and show that in reality they are consistent. Comparing those that reported normal or high cholesterol readings several years prior to diagnosis with others where, at the time of diagnosis, levels were low, they conclude that it was a long term lowering of blood cholesterol levels that gave rise to the cancers. Interestingly, the average blood cholesterol level of those who developed the cancers declined to an average 5.56 mmol/l and yet the British government's Health of the Nation strategy still aims to reduce everyone's levels to below 5.2 mmol/l.





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