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High Cholesterol Message Board


High Cholesterol Board Index


This is of great concern to me at the present time. Since August my Doctor has me taking 2,000mg immediate release Niacin at bed time. I take (2) 1,000mg immediate release capsules together per his orders. I will see my Doctor in February for another lipid panel and will share my full results then. This will give me a sold six months on Niacin.

What I am concerned about now is my liver function. In the past I have had no issues with my liver. I am concerned as my enzymes can be extremely elevated now and I may know nothing about it. My Doctor advised he does not want me to come in till February and he said he will do my lipid panel and check my liver function and blood glucose then. Just concerned as to why my Doctor is making me wait six months as he currently has me taking 2,000mg. But my Doctor said he is not concerned that's why he advised six months is fine. Any comments would be greatly appreciated.
[QUOTE=Lord_Taff;3317070]Hi love2fishfork


Fulminant hepatic failure (Acute liver failure). - Liver function loss 80-90%.
Doses over 2 grams per day have been associated with liver damage, particularly with slow-release formulations. (ie: Niaspan)

[/QUOTE]

I know that slow-release Niacin (e.g., Slo-Niacin brand) above 2000 mg has definitely been associated with the Liver damage potential... but you are absolutely wrong to lump Niaspan... or immediate release niacin for that matter... with the likes of Slo-Niacin.

I'd like to see your proof that Niapsan 3000 mg and below is likely to cause liver damage... I don't think you can produce this proof. The FDA would have never approved Niaspan if this was true.

Niaspan is extended release... not slow-release... and Niaspan is the only FDA approved extended release niacin available. To be an FDA approved medication... there is a lot of study and science and double blind testing that goes on. And I have not been able to find any issue with Niaspan through all my research and personal experience, other than the flushing... and yes, in some cases, the elevated glucose lever that you have mentioned. But an elevated glucose level... or even uric acid build up... is a far cry from liver damage. Niaspan is only likely to cause uric acid build-up and increased glucose levels when taken 3000 mg a day. It is extremely unlikely when only taking 2000 mg a day.

Sorry... you need to specifically address the product that causes problems and not lump all products into one generalized barrel.

Even more specifically... immediate release niacin does not cause any of the issues you describe. For the folks that can take the flushing of immediate release niacin... you have nary a worry on the world taking doses above 2000 mg.
[QUOTE=VentureMan;3317589]I know that slow-release Niacin (e.g., Slo-Niacin brand) above 2000 mg has definitely been associated with the Liver damage potential... but you are absolutely wrong to lump Niaspan... or immediate release niacin for that matter... with the likes of Slo-Niacin.

I'd like to see your proof that Niapsan 3000 mg and below is likely to cause liver damage... I don't think you can produce this proof. The FDA would have never approved Niaspan if this was true.

Niaspan is extended release... not slow-release... and Niaspan is the only FDA approved extended release niacin available. To be an FDA approved medication... there is a lot of study and science and double blind testing that goes on. And I have not been able to find any issue with Niaspan through all my research and personal experience, other than the flushing... and yes, in some cases, the elevated glucose lever that you have mentioned. But an elevated glucose level... or even uric acid build up... is a far cry from liver damage. Niaspan is only likely to cause uric acid build-up and increased glucose levels when taken 3000 mg a day. It is extremely unlikely when only taking 2000 mg a day.

Sorry... you need to specifically address the product that causes problems and not lump all products into one generalized barrel.

Even more specifically... immediate release niacin does not cause any of the issues you describe. For the folks that can take the flushing of immediate release niacin... you have nary a worry on the world taking doses above 2000 mg.[/QUOTE]

That is the same as my Doctor advised. He said I would have no issues with 2,000mg immediate release besides the flushing :mad:. I talked to him about this and he told me not to worry about any other side effects. What he did say however is to stay away from Slo-Niacin. When I began my Niacin therapy I asked him about Slo-Niacin and he said he would not allow me to take it. But yes immediate release and (RX) Niaspan are extremely safe.
[QUOTE=Arizona77;3317531]This is of great concern to me at the present time.
What I am concerned about now is my liver function. [/QUOTE]


There are no issues with immediate release niacin. It is the benchmark of niacin therapy. It's not in wide use because most can't tollerate the flushing... not because it has been proven harmful.

Let's not lump all forms of niacin into the one pile... especially immedaite release... and Niaspan... and certainly not with out sustainable proof.





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