It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Chronic Fatigue Message Board


Chronic Fatigue Board Index


Hi,

I get really tired during the day, and suffer from low energy levels and find it very had to concentrate on the work at hand. I heard somewhere that I can get i nutrionist or someone to write me out an eating plan to maximise the energy i get from the food i eat. Has anyone obtained a diet like this? or can they recommend suitable foods that give me the most amount of energy. I currently consume multi-vitamins, vitamin c, ginseng, cQ10 & zanistanol to help me fight the fatigue during the day. I exercise twice a week and only drink 1 cup of coffee per day, and that is as soon as I wake up in the morning. But still suffer from low energy levels during the day.

Cheers.
i recently tried the candida or a similar caveman diet and have regained some energy and lost some of the fatigued feeling.main things to avoid are sugars and carbs.
Hi,

Where did you obtain that diet from?
Yes, eating low carb (the caveman diet is one example, Atkins another) is a great way to maintain energy, not to speak of the other health benefits.
the diet is found everywhere i found mine off a candida site
detox's wouldnt hurt either
[QUOTE=peregrine]Yes, eating low carb (the caveman diet is one example, Atkins another) is a great way to maintain energy, not to speak of the other health benefits.[/QUOTE]

what other health benefits are there of eating a high protein diet with low carbs???

alex.
increasing your intake of raw food is could be helpful. when you consume cooked food there is actually an immune system response (analysis of the blood shows the immune system in a state of emergency). with the body actually viewing the food as a foreign invader. this saps your energy as the body sees fighting off the deemed invader are more important avenue for energy useage. but also digesting cooked food is very energy consuming (ever noticed feeling tired after eating). raw foods contain enzymes that aid digestion considerably and free up this energy to a large extent. a diet based on raw grain muesli, salads, nuts and seeds, lightly stir fried vegetables, raw veg juices and raw whole fruits, alongside cooked whole grains, lean meats and fish and cold pressed vegetable oils will give your body real food it will thrive on. a high protein diet can be helpful in one respect in that it raises noradrenaline and dopamine levels in the brain (two chemical messengers which keep you alert and motivated and full of energy). but bare in mind that the main energy source for the body is carbohydrate, the brain included (it can only use glucose or glutamic acid for fuel). so a high protein diet will raise noradrenaline and dopamine levels in the brain but will in its nature be low in carbohyrates which the body best sources glucose from (it can from protein but much prefers it form carbs), so it may actually contribute to fatigue in the end (this is why many atkins diet followers get tired on the diet).
there is a way round it. follow a healthy diet as recommended above no more than 20% protein, 30% fat and 50% carbs. in between meals take L-tyrosine tablets (experiment to see how many you need at a time, they come in 500mg doses, so start off low and take more of need be). tyrosine is the precursor amino acid to the two chemical messengers i mentioned before (dopamine and noradrenaline) and taking it between meals can promote vitality and energy. this is a much healthier and more effective way of promoting this alert brain chemistry. a high protein body when it isn't needed for an actvity such as body building strains certain oragns and can cause a state of over acidity in the blood which leads to the body releasing calcium form bones to neutralise the acid environment which can contribute to osteoporosis over time. precursor therapy can be very effective depending on the condition. another example is depression and anxiet, where 5-HTP is given as a supplement to boost serotonin levels.

alex.
[QUOTE=ratboy83]what other health benefits are there of eating a high protein diet with low carbs???

alex.[/QUOTE]

Atkins lists [I]numerous [/I]examples of the benefits in his book, such as lowering blood sugar for diabetics, contributing to weight loss, lowering blood pressure, etc...........

Personally, it helps to keep my cholesterol in good shape as well.
Sorry if I'm not correct here, but does the Atkins diet recommend eating a bunch of red meat, such as bacon, to help promote weight loss? I thought I had heard that a few years back. If so, even if people lost weight that way, I don't see how that would be healthy.
[QUOTE=Concerned Male]Sorry if I'm not correct here, but does the Atkins diet recommend eating a bunch of red meat, such as bacon, to help promote weight loss? I thought I had heard that a few years back. If so, even if people lost weight that way, I don't see how that would be healthy.[/QUOTE]

He recommends eating high protein/ low carb. You can gear this to [I]your[/I] choices around that. I don't eat bacon, but I eat meat,fish and poultry and I am much healthier than I was when macrobiotic or eating a lot of grains. This works for me, it may not for everyone. I also like the concepts of the blood type diet developed by Dr. Adamo. I am O positive so this way of eating, for me, works for that system as well. My daughter, however, is A positive and does better on a more vegetarian/grain way of eating.
Peregrine,
Thanks for the reply. Then I guess technically, a person could be on the Atkins diet, and be a vegetarian, as long as they ate non-meat foods that were high in protein, and also ate low carb foods?
If you are having major problems with fatigue, I recommend that you don't follow a "strick" low carb diet, meaning only meats, cheeses, eggs, fats, and the occasional salad. I had a long discussion with my doctor who is a CFS specialist about diet, and she said no one with CFS should be strick low carb. That said....eliminating bad carbs can be a great help. Ditch the soda, the white breads, the sugar, the processed foods like chips and cookies and even fruit juice. I was told that I have to eat 6+ servings of fruits and veggies a day. Try making home made fruit smoothies with no added sugar, add a little milk. Eat raw foods like broccoli, fresh salads, tomatoes. Eat nuts, they are good for you in moderation. Eat fresh chicken and fish, preferably organic. Limit red meat. And avoid alcohol at all costs.
Natalie,

Low carb does [I]not[/I] mean that you don't eat veggies or fruit, you just try to avoid those that have a high carb content. You might want to do some research on the concept. Just a suggestion.

Concerned Male,

Going low carb was one of the best things I did for my CFS (in terms of lowering fatigue levels) and it also lowered my cholesterol. After you've been doing it for awhile the suggestion is that you add more grains and other things, but in small amounts so that you still maintain the low carbs and keep blood glucose level down.
[QUOTE=peregrine]Natalie,

Low carb does [I]not[/I] mean that you don't eat veggies or fruit, you just try to avoid those that have a high carb content. You might want to do some research on the concept. Just a suggestion.

Concerned Male,

Going low carb was one of the best things I did for my CFS (in terms of lowering fatigue levels) and it also lowered my cholesterol. After you've been doing it for awhile the suggestion is that you add more grains and other things, but in small amounts so that you still maintain the low carbs and keep blood glucose level down.[/QUOTE]


I knew that you would jump on me for my comments. I was talking about STRICT LOW CARB. That is why I used the word STRICT. Meat, cheese, eggs, fats. That is strick low carb.

I don't need to do any research, I am fully informed of the dangers of STRICT low carb, for healthy and unhealthy (CFS) individuals. Perhaps you and other low carb people should not be so quick to take offense. It is just a diet, afterall, and nothing that needs to be defended so aggressively.
There was no aggression in [I]my[/I] comment at all. I don't know of anyone eating low carb (strict or not) who restricts all vegetables and fruit so your comment seemed rather extreme and one-sided to me.

Take care
[QUOTE=peregrine]There was no aggression in [I]my[/I] comment at all. I don't know of anyone eating low carb (strict or not) who restricts all vegetables and fruit so [I]your[/I] comment seemed rather extreme and one-sided.

Take care[/QUOTE]

Obviously, you don't understand the meaning of strict in relation to low carb. I have know many people and have talked to many people online who were strict low carbers, and they ate few veggies and fruits never touched their mouths.

Sarcastically telling me that I "might want to do some research on the concept" is in fact aggressive, in my opinion. I'm fully infomed, you just did not agree with what I said.
[QUOTE=Concerned Male]Peregrine,
Thanks for the reply. Then I guess technically, a person could be on the Atkins diet, and be a vegetarian, as long as they ate non-meat foods that were high in protein, and also ate low carb foods?[/QUOTE]

Concerned,

If you are interested in low carbing I would read Dr. Atkins first book, just because he explains [I]so well[/I] the reasoning behind the concept. When I first switched to this way of eating (over 10 years ago), understanding [I]why[/I] I was doing so, what the benefits were, how the body works with certain foods, etc. was really helpful for me to make the change to that way of eating.

All the best





All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:19 PM.





© 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!