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Cancer: Colon Message Board


Cancer: Colon Board Index


Has anyone on this board been diagnosed with Lynch syndrome associated with colorectal cancer. The reason I ask is because I have begun genetic testing due to (quick and relatively young) cancer deaths in my family (mother 57 Non-hodgkins to brain tumour, uncle 60 colon cancer, grandfather 57 colon cancer, grandmother 60 non-hodgkins, and most recently brother 56 non-hodgkins to pancreatic tumour).

Although our familial cancers are predominately colorectal - they do see a strange trend in non specific cancers.

Can anyone tell me if they know of this Lynch syndrome and if these other cancers sound like something that could be associated with the genetic disorder.

Thanks .. Liz
Hi Liz,

My 81 year old aunt underwent her first bout of colon cancer at about the age of 54. She had a resection,then had another about about the age 70 and underwent another resection. At the age of 80, she was diagnosed agai with colon cancer and one year ago, underwent a subtotal resection. Despite taking chemo, she is eating, dancing and continuing everyday activities. It was during this last bout that she met with a geneticist that diagnosed her with Lynch. Her sibling, my father, had bouts with skin cancer, colon polyps, renal cancer, esophogal cancer and finally succombed to bone cancer ten years later.

My brother was diagnosed with colon cancer at the age of 51. He is now clean and free of it after five years, after it was removed. He did not undergo chemo. He is a year older than me. I was diagnosed with it last month and am scheduled for a subtotal resection next week.

Of the three siblings in our family, two have colon cancer and one, I suspect, is not being surveilled.

I became to do a genealogical investigation into the age of morbidity in our family to determine where the gene may have come. As well, the survivors in our family are working with a sibling study at Case Western University to help determine the gene that is mutated. May or may not be Lynch, but cancers often run in familial groups. Sometimes they skip a generation.

Unfortunately, in earlier days, individuals did not go into the hospital for testing and only when symptoms were bad. Often deaths were listed simply as "heart failure." Fortunately, my father recalled his father had "stomach cancer." I researched the cause of death of his father's six siblings (my grandfather's) and found four of six died exactly at the age of 55. One was diagnosed as cancer while my grandfather was diagnosed as "heart failure" as well as two other siblings.

I went back to the mid eighteen hundreds and did not find it in my great grandfather's line but did find six of seven siblings in my grandfather's mother's line died between the ages of 52 and 62, which was most likely a result of cancer.

There is a lot of research about Lynch and familial cancers online. With Lynch, several areas of the body can be susceptible to cancer, including the renal pelvic area, the colon, the liver, the lungs and the breast as well as the uterus.

With this knowledge, we can arm ourselves with precautionary methods. Get the regular pap smears, a chest Xray every five years, a colonoscopy (not a sigmoidoscopy) every five years from age 25 up for those with Lynch, get genetic counseling done and have regular mammograms and physical checks for lumps in the breasts. Get your children checked genetically to see if they have the mutated gene.

People don't have to die at early ages as they did in the past from cancer. It is quite cureable today. There is hope, considerable hope and considerable technology and studies.

I view my upcoming surgery as a blessing. I had little doubt the cancer would occur and the stress was wondering when. Now, there is relief in knowing so I can get the treatment. Hopefully, they will be able to determine the location of the mutation of our gene in our family to benefit generations to come.

Its a part of living and as far as I'm concerned a minor inconvenience to continue this wondrous thing we experience, called life. One thing for sure is there is the reinforced fact that life is uncertain, whether or not one has a cancer gene or not or has cancer or not. Fortunately, this is one of those uncertainties that, in many instances, can be controlled by modern day medicine.

So, get those tests. If your doctor balks, scream and scream loud. Go higher if you have to. And stay positive...learn all you can. Once you have the knowledge of your genetic situation, the fear will subside.





[QUOTE=lizf;3276725]Has anyone on this board been diagnosed with Lynch syndrome associated with colorectal cancer. The reason I ask is because I have begun genetic testing due to (quick and relatively young) cancer deaths in my family (mother 57 Non-hodgkins to brain tumour, uncle 60 colon cancer, grandfather 57 colon cancer, grandmother 60 non-hodgkins, and most recently brother 56 non-hodgkins to pancreatic tumour).

Although our familial cancers are predominately colorectal - they do see a strange trend in non specific cancers.

Can anyone tell me if they know of this Lynch syndrome and if these other cancers sound like something that could be associated with the genetic disorder.

Thanks .. Liz[/QUOTE]





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