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Diet & Nutrition Message Board


Diet & Nutrition Board Index


[QUOTE=Andrew29]I'm on medication that requires that I keep my cholesterol and trigylceride levels low. I have a diet that is high in unsaturated fats because I do tend to eat a lot nuts and use Flaxseed Oil. Can too much unsaturated fats cause these levels to rise?[/QUOTE]What kind of medication are you referring to?

Dietary fats have little if any negative impact on fasting triglyceride levels. Elevated triglyceride levels are generally associated with excess carbohydrate consumption. If you are active, then you can safely consume higher levels of carbohydrates since they will be used for energy; however, if you are not that active, then excess carbohydrates get converted into tryglicerides in the liver for storage as fat. Triglyceride levels are best controlled by exercise and/or carbohydrate restriction, especially sugars and quickly digested starchy carbohydrates.

Saturated fats tend to raise HDL while having an essentially neutral effect on Total Cholesterol and LDL with some studies showing a slight increase in calculated LDL. Monounsaturated fats, like the predominate fat in nuts, also tend to raise HDL levels while also lowering LDL levels. Polyunsaturated fats tend to lower both HDL (the "good" cholesterol) and LDL. Trans-fatty acids like those found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oils tend lower HDL "the good cholesterol" while raising LDL "the bad cholesterol".
[QUOTE=arkie6]What kind of medication are you referring to?

Dietary fats have little if any negative impact on fasting triglyceride levels. Elevated triglyceride levels are generally associated with excess carbohydrate consumption. If you are active, then you can safely consume higher levels of carbohydrates since they will be used for energy; however, if you are not that active, then excess carbohydrates get converted into tryglicerides in the liver for storage as fat. Triglyceride levels are best controlled by exercise and/or carbohydrate restriction, especially sugars and quickly digested starchy carbohydrates.

Saturated fats tend to raise HDL while having an essentially neutral effect on Total Cholesterol and LDL with some studies showing a slight increase in calculated LDL. Monounsaturated fats, like the predominate fat in nuts, also tend to raise HDL levels while also lowering LDL levels. Polyunsaturated fats tend to lower both HDL (the "good" cholesterol) and LDL. Trans-fatty acids like those found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oils tend lower HDL "the good cholesterol" while raising LDL "the bad cholesterol".[/QUOTE]

The medication I am taking is Accutane (aka Isotretinoin). And yes, I am aware of the dangers.





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