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Exercise & Fitness Message Board


Exercise & Fitness Board Index


You're not being dull :)

Normally it's 50 minutes cardio and 1 hour weights per session, 4 sessions a week. Usually it's 20 min cardio - weights - 15 min cardio - weights - 15 min cardio OR 25 min cardio - weights - 20 min cardio. (That's a long time in the gym though, so if there's any way I can use my time more efficiently...)

What would be good food for after exercise? A banana? And for protein?

I need 0.8 g of protein per pound of bodyweight? Let's see... 63 kilo = 139 pounds. So I need 111.2 g protein, right? How many grams of meat is that? Are soy shoots (is this correct English?) good for protein? Not quite sure what whey is, or where to get it... And why should I eat less bread?

Hm, I can give you an idea of what I eat, but I don't know about the amount of calories, nor how much fat, carbs and protein...
I have very irregular eating habits. On Friday, Saturday and Sunday I eat at home, so basically I have to eat what my mother prepares. Examples of main meals: steak (nice and bloody, no sauce for me, I probably eat 150-200 grams), raw vegetables, fries/cooked potato (if it's cooked potato I usually add some "barbecue sauce", if it's fries I add salt); chicken filets (100 grams?), white rice, sweet 'n sour sauce with veggies; meat balls (100 grams?), Belgian endives in light cream sauce, potatoes fried in a pan;... There's so much variety, I can't sum it all up. I usually don't take much meat (unless it's turkey, chicken or steak, then I might reach 200 grams of meat). I have no idea how much I eat (never weighed my meals) but maybe it'll give you an indication when I tell you I have a hard time finishing restaurant meals (I usually make it halfway, or 3/4, by pushing) (I live in Europe, if this makes a difference). At home I'll finish a normal plate, and depending on my appetite (and how tasty the food is) I'll take a second serving of veggies (and fries, if there are any). Not sure if any of this is actually useful info...
The second meal of the day is bread: usually appr. 5 average sized slices of whole grain bread, with cold cuts or cheese (once a month I'll eat one with marmelade or chocolate spread), usually with a glass of OJ. During the weekend I sometimes have chips as a snack (or preferably Japanese rice crackers)

During the week I'm at uni (where I have a small apartment). Main meals vary between home made (if I have the time) (usually lots of veggies, with some olive oil, with probably 75-100 grams of meat or the same amount of meat replacements) or prepared meals. Sometimes it's pasta with veggies, or meat (replacements) with rice and veggies. I rarely use butter, mostly olive oil, and I rarely use cream. The second meal is usually some bread rolls or something similar, often followed by canned fruit (with fruit juice, not syrup) (probably 300 g, at 50 kcal per 100 g), sometimes a bowl of soup too.
Examples: yesterday:
lunch: one 'Italian roll' (not quite sure how to describe this, just a lump of bread basically) and 2 small vanilla muffins.
Dinner: one prepared meal: pasta with ham and spring vegetables and a light sauce (391 kcal according to the package) followed by 250g of low fat yoghurt (48 kcal/100 g) (flavoured with cocoa, not sure how many calories)
No snacks. Only water to drink (except 1 Yakult)

Tuesday:
Lunch: Swedish rolls (whole grain, no added sugar, nothing on them) (100 g? 325 calories?), 300g canned fruit.
Dinner: a pizza from the freezer (yes I know, pizza is bad...): 375g, 221 kcal/100g (but I don't eat the pepperoni on top)
Snacks: some Swedish rolls.
Drinks: water and 1 Yakult.

Also, I eat out once a week (often in a vegetarian health food restaurant)
For snacks I try to eat some fruit occasionally, but so far I haven't been very succesful :)


Phew... Long post, and I'm still not sure if any of this is useful... When I reread it though, it does seem like I'm not eating that much... Feel free to ask questions or give advice!:)
This is definitely useful. I'll make some recommendations for you, but it's going to be pretty general guideline kind of stuff since you're adhering to any strict sort of diet and don't seem real keen on starting one. ;) And that okay. You can still make better food and portion choices to reach your goals.
It's kind of hard to determine what your caloric intake is based on a general description, which is why I recommended that you write down what you eat for a while. I don't know if you have a scale available or can maybe check out a package to get an idea of what certain portions of food look like (to "eyeball" it) but you need to get some idea of how much your taking in. The principle rule of weight loss is to eat fewer calories than you burn. The USDA website can be very helpful for looking up the nutritional content of food as well. You can find out how many calories, how much protein, carbs and fat is in whatever you're eating. I know this is all pretty new but once you get the hang of it, nutrition is easy. :) I have a sort of 101 guide I'll post for you too.

[QUOTE=lietchi]

Normally it's 50 minutes cardio and 1 hour weights per session, 4 sessions a week. Usually it's 20 min cardio - weights - 15 min cardio - weights - 15 min cardio OR 25 min cardio - weights - 20 min cardio. (That's a long time in the gym though, so if there's any way I can use my time more efficiently...)[/QUOTE]

2 hours is too long to be in the gym. If you're in there 4 or 5 times during the week you might try doing 30-45 minutes of weights first (after a short warmup, of course) and then 30 minutes of cardio. That way you have some blood sugar available for energy for the weights and then by the time you get to the cardio, your body is more inclined to tap into fat for fuel. It'll shorten your time and should improve results.

[QUOTE]What would be good food for after exercise? A banana? And for protein?[/QUOTE]

A banana would be fine. For protein, ideally whey and water because whey absorbs very quickly into the body which is what you want right after exercise. Whey is a powdered protein supplement you can get at any sports nutrition store, some health food stores and online. It's not very expensive and it's a very easy way to get in some extra protein, especially for the non-meat eaters. I get mine online, but if you just want to try it, get a small container somewhere local.
If you don't want to go the whey route, maybe a small egg white omelette, or scrambled egg whites, tofu, a protein bar, anything is better than nothing so whatever you have on hand that you will eat.

[QUOTE]I need 0.8 g of protein per pound of bodyweight? Let's see... 63 kilo = 139 pounds. So I need 111.2 g protein, right? How many grams of meat is that? Are soy shoots (is this correct English?) good for protein? And why should I eat less bread?[/QUOTE]

That's about right, but for now, any increase in protein is an improvement. You dont have to become a meat monger right away, just bump up your intake some. It takes a little getting used to. "Meat" has varying amounts of protein. You're going to have to check out each source for yourself. Chicken and turkey breast are best "meat" sources because they have very little fat. Salmon and mackerel are good too because they do have fat, but it's GOOD fat (and protein).

I recommended a decrease in bread because bread (and white rice and pasta) is a high GI carbohydrate. That means that it is digested and absorbed very rapidly by the body. Anything that can't be used right away for energy purposes gets stored as fat. Things like oatmeal and beans and wild rice are lower GI, so they burn more slowly, providing more sustained energy and less likelihood of going right to fat stores. but in general, if you're increasing your protein, you need to take calories away from your diet somewhere else and bread is a good place to do it. Once in a while is ok, but keep it to whole grain types of bread if you can. Fries are bad, bad, bad, bad. Avoid them whenever possible.

Also, be careful of all the sauces you have. Sauces are often high in sugar and/or high in fat. "Naked" food, ot a little pepper and salt is much healthier and will lower your calories.

Hope that's helpful. Your diet isn't altogether bad, but some small changes can make a big difference.
[QUOTE=lietchi]
Btw, are sunflower seeds good for protein? And pine nuts?[/QUOTE]

not the best protein sources, but they do have some. The downfall is in the high fat content. Granted it's good fats, but the calories add up very quickly and too much will kill your diet.

[QUOTE]I read that milk is good for protein, but I only like chocolate milk (a no-no for sugars :nono: ). Would soy milk be good? (And does it taste better than "ordinary" milk? :) )[/QUOTE]

Soymilk is a great substitute. It tastes different than real milk. Personally, I like it better, but some people don't. They make single serving sizes if you want to just try it before going for the full quart.

[QUOTE]...are there other ways to find out if I'm losing or gaining muscle?[/QUOTE]

Not reliably. You can "eyeball" it, but for a real gauge you need measurements.

[QUOTE]By the way, the (whole grain) bread I eat is always fresh from the baker's, never prepackaged "junk". Does that make it any healthier?
(Yes, I'm doing everything to justify me still eating bread )[/QUOTE]

Maybe a little healthier, but it doesn't really change anything toward being a deteriment to your goals. Like I said, some bread is ok. Carbs aren't the devil, but bread just isn't very conducive for getting or staying lean.





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