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Knee & Hip Problems Message Board


Knee & Hip Problems Board Index


A common spot for bursitis is on the side of the hip. Here a large tendon passes over the bony bump on the side of the hip. The bony bump is called the greater trochanter. Inflammation in the bursa between the tendon and the greater trochanter is called trochanteric bursitis.

This problem is common in older individuals.

It may also occur in younger patients who are extremely active in exercises such as walking, running, or biking.

This sounds that it might be related to your active life with skiing.

Where friction occurs between muscles, tendons, and bones, there is usually a structure called a bursa. A bursa is a thin sac of tissue that contains fluid to lubricate the area and reduce friction. The bursa is a normal structure. The body will even produce a bursa in response to friction.


Sometimes a bursa can become inflamed (swollen and irritated) because of too much friction or because of an injury to the bursa. An inflamed bursa can cause pain because movement makes the structures around the bursa rub against it.

Friction can build in the bursa during walking if the long tendon on the side of the thigh is tight. It is unclear what causes this tightening of the tendon. The gluteus maximus attaches to this long tendon. As you walk, the gluteus maximus pulls this tendon over the greater trochanter with each step. When the tendon is tight, it rubs against the bursa. The rubbing causes friction to build in the bursa, leading to irritation and inflammation. Friction can also start if the outer hip muscle (gluteus medius) is weak, if one leg is longer than the other, or if you run on banked (slanted) surfaces.


Most cases of trochanteric bursitis appear gradually with no obvious underlying injury or cause. Trochanteric bursitis can occur after artificial replacement of the hip joint or other types of hip surgery. The cause may be a combination of changes in the way the hip works, the way it is aligned, or the way scar tissue has formed from the healing incision.

A fall on the hip can cause bleeding into the bursa, forming a hematoma. The bleeding is not serious, but the bursa may react to the blood by becoming inflamed. The inflammation causes the bursa to become thickened over time. This thickening, constant irritation, and inflammation may result in the condition becoming chronic, or long lasting.


I"m not sure what type of doctor you should see, because I too am in the same boat you are regarding my hip problem. I definetly agree that you should stop seeing the dr. that isn't really listening to you. the one with the dumb smile on his face.
This guy sounds like my doctor. LOL
I am in the market for a new doctor too.
so far my rheumy doctor seems to be helping me the most.
she explained everything to me in detail and takes the time to listen to me when I say i"m in pain.

keep us informed with your updates. I"m very curious as to what becomes of this for you.


hang in there, you're a tough cookie. ;)





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