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Re: What next?
Sep 17, 2002
I know this is alot of info but this explains what some procedures the dr's do for infertility. (I got this off of the internet)

HSG- Hysterosalpinogram is the technical name. This test takes roughly 30-40 minutes depending upon the doctor performing it. It is used to gauge whether your fallopian tubes are open or not. A catheter is inserted through your cervix up into your uterus. X-ray dye is then shot through the catheter and pictures are taken every couple of seconds. If your tubes are open you will see the dye spill out of both tubes. This test is minorly painful and I’d recommend some ibuprofen before and after to help with the pain.

Hysteroscopy- I've never experienced a hysteroscopy but from reading and talking to friends I have found that it is basically an easier way to take get a look at a woman’s reproductive organs without having to do surgery. A thin telescope mounted with a fiber optic light is inserted through the cervix, pictures are then taken for the doctor review. A hysteroscopy is not usually done unless an abnormality was seen on the HSG.

Endometrial Biopsy- This test is usually performed between 11-13 days after ovulation. A small scraping of the endometrium will be taken and analyzed. The most common reason for this test is to see if a woman has a luteal phase defect. (Note: This test should not be done unless a Beta HCG has been done and proven to be negative, it could be potentionally deadly to the brand new fetus if done on a woman who is very early in a pregnancy)

Laparoscopy- When there is absolutely no other explanation an exploratory surgery is sometimes called for. A lap, as most people call it, is done through 2 tiny incisions on either side of your belly button by your ovaries they also use one right below your belly button. A camera is then inserted and the doctor can take a peek at exactly what is going on in your reproductive organs.

Post Coital- This is most often used to make sure that a woman’s' cervical mucous is not killing off her husbands sperm. The couple has intercourse and roughly 12-24 hours later a Dr. goes in and takes a sample, similar to a pap smear. The sample is then looked at under a microscope to see if the sperm are able to swim and live in the mucous. If it is found that the mucous is a hostile environment for the sperm IUI is almost always the recommended course.

Semen Analysis- A samples of the mans sperm is taken and analyzed under a microscope. A total count is taken along with the volume of the ejaculate, and the consistency. The more in depth parts of the analysis include motility and morphology. If a man’s SA comes back abnormal there is always a second test. If 2 SA’s come back abnormal an appointment with an urologist might be worth consideration. With male factor IUI is considered the most reasonable option unless the male factor is very severe. If severe the only viable option is IVF with ICSI.

Day 3 blood work- This usually consists of an E2 (measure of estrogen in your system), FSH (measuring follicle stimulating hormone… high FSH can be a sign of premature menopause in women under 40), LH (Leutenizing hormone…the hormone that naturally gives your body the push to ovulate)

Blood work done at 7 days past ovulation- Interestingly enough many ignorant physicians order this blood work done on Day 21 of your cycle the only issues is that MANY women do not ovulate on Day 14. For the measurements to be accurate it needs to be done 7 days past the date of ovulation. Usually Progesterone and E2 are checked. If progesterone is low a supplemental form of P4 is added.


[This message has been edited by odiej (edited 09-17-2002).]

[This message has been edited by odiej (edited 09-20-2002).]






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