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Multiple Sclerosis Message Board


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I read the book [U]Blindsided[/U] written by Richard Cohen who has had MS for approx. 30 years. It is a new book out and can even be accessible by the library.

I recommend it as once read you'll understand more about MS. It is inspirational as Cohen shares his story on how he managed his life with this illness. He is incredible. I don't want to give too much of it away for obvious reasons. I just wanted to bring it to your attention.

Also, I recommend the book to anyone whose life has changed due to any illness. Even if it is not MS. You'll learn a lot and come away with a new perspective on how to reshape your life.

For those of you with ON or any visual problem, you will definitely appreciate his humor!

Happy Reading!
Yes, it is a good book to read. I enjoyed it. A great story.
Hi Calsun,

I read the book about 9 months ago or so. My brother bought it for me as a gift from ***********, when it first came out.

I think it was a pretty good book, but I didn't like a lot of what I read. I think that at that time, I was in denial, so it saddened me.

I felt that Richard focused a lot on the disease, instead of "Lifting a Life Above Illness", like the subtitle implied. The title "Blindsided" was perfect.

I gave the book to my primary care physician, asked her, "Do you read"? (How stupid a question is that?) Well, I corrected myself, "Recreationally, I mean". I told her I was going to throw the book away, but thought that maybe she might like to see what it is that we, that have MS, have to deal with. She wanted to read it.

Maybe if I wasn't in denial, or hopefully wishing it would all go away, eventhough I had a dx and refused any type of treatment at the time, I might have found it enlightening. Instead, I found it self-absorbed, and not uplifting at all.

I am sorry for my counter-point, but I had to express how I felt 9 months ago.

All the best, and take care of you!
Chrissy
[QUOTE=elecchic1022]Hi Calsun,

I read the book about 9 months ago or so. My brother bought it for me as a gift from ***********, when it first came out.

I think it was a pretty good book, but I didn't like a lot of what I read. I think that at that time, I was in denial, so it saddened me.

I felt that Richard focused a lot on the disease, instead of "Lifting a Life Above Illness", like the subtitle implied. The title "Blindsided" was perfect.

I gave the book to my primary care physician, asked her, "Do you read"? (How stupid a question is that?) Well, I corrected myself, "Recreationally, I mean". I told her I was going to throw the book away, but thought that maybe she might like to see what it is that we, that have MS, have to deal with. She wanted to read it.

Maybe if I wasn't in denial, or hopefully wishing it would all go away, eventhough I had a dx and refused any type of treatment at the time, I might have found it enlightening. Instead, I found it self-absorbed, and not uplifting at all.

I am sorry for my counter-point, but I had to express how I felt 9 months ago.

All the best, and take care of you!
Chrissy[/QUOTE]

Hey Chrissy! I understand what you mean and I am glad you expressed those thoughts. All views are welcomed.

There were some good points and some humor but I also got the impression that this book is for his children to read. His children never knew him without being ill, and this book gives insight to what he was like before illness, and the end of the book,I felt, was definitely devoted to them as well. The book definitely expresses the sadness too and emotional affects from the MS condition. That is not funny but realistic.

What I felt was good for those who were undiagnosed is that it gives insight into the actual symptoms of what he experienced and treatmetn. Someone who is wondering could benefit. Also, he kept working despite the challenges because it appears he did not have the chronic progressive type, plus he had lots of support.

I think your passing the book onto your physician was a great idea. Those in the healthcare field definitely need to be aware of how MS affects a person's life so there is better understanding, and hopefully better care for them. For example, when our board member Purple was in the hospital to get steroids, an xray tech wanted her to come to the xray lab instead of following dr orders of doing the xray in the patient's room. The tech wanted to inconvenience the patient for her benefit. If she understood better what ignoring the dr's order does to an MS patient, she wouldn't have asked and stressed out the patient but complied with the doctor's orders. Instead, she was more concerned with her own needs thinking the MS patient could get to and from her lab. This action from the tech galls me.

So the more info others know the better I think! :)





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