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Hello all,

I visited my surgeon yesterday for follow-up. I was hit by a car while riding my motorcycle in September '04. It was a broadside hit on my left side, fracturing my Femur, Pelvis & Wrist. The surgeon said all of the ortho work on my fractures were healing well. However, it has left me with nerve damage, that includes a "dropped foot" and lack of sensitivity in my lower leg. He sent me to get an EMG performed yesterday also. Keep in mind that I have been told for the past 6 months that the nerve will regenerate and within a year or so, have full use of my foot again.

After the EMG (which wasn't as bad as I had envisioned), the doctor immediately told me, "The news is not very good. Your Peroneal Nerve is damaged beyond repair. Your current condition is permanent, barring a miracle". I almost cried. The nerve damage has left me with an ankle contracture that makes my foot like a "ballerina" - constantly pressing down. When I stand, I stand on the ball of my foot and the ankle will not allow my foot to rest in the neutral position. In addition, the loss of sensitivity makes my foot like that of a diabetic. In fact, last week I developed an ingrown toenail that became severly infected. This is dangerous when you have poor bloodflow. I am seeing a Podiatrist this morning to have the nail cut out (great!).

I have a MOFO (brace) that I can't wear due to the contracture. So, they have prescribed for me a modified brace that will support the contracture. It is basically two rods that are built into the shoe and go up each side of my leg with a strap around the top of my calf. I will have to wear this for some time. Eventually, they plan to lengthen the "heal cord" to put my foot in more of a neutral position. I have no idea when they plan on that. In short, I will have to wear a brace for the rest of my life - boooooo!

This has beeen such an ordeal. An afternoon ride to get some videos at Blockbuster, two miles from my house, results in a life-long disability. Anyway, I am sure there are others dealing with this same disability and were wondering if you could share your stories and give me advice on any new surgical techniques, suggestions, or just your own thoughts.

Thank you in advance - we all need each other in times like this!


BrentLinton
Hi Brent.
I'm so very sorry to hear of your injury. Did they suspect the foot drop at the time of your injury? Were you in a foot brace from the beginning? My foot drop was diagnosed a few days after my injury in Oct 03.. I was told I had to wear a foot brace 24 hours a day 7 days a week or my foot would do the "ballerina point" and it would be permanent. That news alone made me a faithfull brace wearer. Last July I stopped wearing the brace at night (have to wear it during the day just to walk) and have recently notice my foot starting to "point". I am starting back with the night brace. I had 2 EMG's and was told the nerve wasn't regenerating. The surgical option I was given was a "posterier tibial tendon transfer" that would take place approx 18 months from the date of injury. The surgery would lock the foot in a 90 degree angle hopefully allowing me to not have to wear the brace. I was in PT for 4-4 1/2 months 3 days a week. I was told to do heal stretches every day several times a day just to keep the achilles tendon from shrinking.
Do you have nerve pain from the foot drop? It took several months of trying different meds to find the one that would help me. Finally finding the pain relief in Elavil.
In my attempt to find answers, i've chatted to several people on this board who share our type of injury. Hopefully you hear from more of them.

Best of luck.
Cindy
[SIZE=2]Hello Brent,
I also have drop foot as of april 22nd, 2004. It happened at work as a fellow employee fell of a scafling and landed on my back. I had an MRI done and I tore my ACL, LCL, Biceps femoris(hamstring) and the worst thing of all, my peroneal nerve is out! I can't move my right foot up and it is all numb on top of the foot up to almost my knee. The doctor told me I would need nerve graph surgery which I had on june 9th, 2004. He said it would take 6-12 months to regenerate. They took 10 inches of nerve from my right calf and put it in my right thigh where the herve was out. It got stretched like a rubberband as the doc tells me. I have this afo brace and I can't stand it. The doc says It is 70% chance of regenerating but its been 9 1/2 months and nothing has changed in my foot. I am praying every night that it comes back. Jason[/B][/I][/SIZE] :confused:
Thank you both for your stories. Sometimes I feel like I am totally alone with this condition. Everyone (including some of my doctors) ask me, "Why aren't you walking yet?".....well, duh!

I found more info on the web about Nerve Grafting and Nerve Transfer, but as i understand (and from BigDog's testimony) that is isn't 100% guranteed. I too have a MOFO that I can't wear. I have the ankle contracture that doesn't allow me to wear it. I hate it anyway - very uncomfortable.

I am supposed to get a new brace made next week that is built into a shoe, I will let you know how that goes. Yeah, I messed up by not wearing my brace for the first month or so. I wore it now and then, but now wear it 24/7 as I can't stand for the foot to be in a dropped position. The "soft boot" I wear doesn't give much support, but it is better than nothing. What type of night splint do you wear?

I am 39 years old and feel like my life has partially ended. We have a trip to Disneyworld in May and I had hoped to be able to walk. Not a chance. As time goes on, I become more and more discouraged. Please share ANY experiences you have!


Brent
What's a MOFO? I wear a custom hinged foot drop brace during the day. Just recently got a "Toe On" brace but I can't seem to get used to it. For the night I have a "A Force Dorsal" brace. I remember early on how wearing the braces would cause so much pain where the straps came over the ankle but that pain has subsided. Because I've never had surgery to fix the ACL/LCL/PCL I must walk with extreme caution at every step.
Also noted earlier this week that I'm having more electrical shocks in DIFFERENT areas of my foot then I've had before. Not sure what that's about.??
I understand the frustration from both of you, even though the doc said it was 70% chance of the nerve coming back I too feel as though if it doesn't that my life would be partially over as well. I can't play any sports right now and I can't run at all with the brace on. I am 30 years old and playing sports was a HUGE part of my life. I am SOOO frustrated by not being able to move my right foot up at all. and every step with that plastic brace feels like a knife into my heel with every step. Jason
Dear Brent:

Thank you for sharing your story. 6 months ago I was stricken with a disease called Rhabdomyolisis which caused such extreme poisoning and edema, I have permanent paralysis in the left leg and permanent foot drop. I wear AFO's to go out, but, as a result of the pain from the nerve damage, I am unable to walk more than 10 to 15 feet and need a walker to do that. I was a perfectly healthy 42 year old woman before this happened and now, am also permanently disabled. It is heartbreaking. I was also told I would possible improve in 6 to 12 months, now am told not to hope for a miracle. At this point, I have learned that there was a surgery that could have been done if performed within a week of the illness. They didnt do that. I am not sure if there are surgeries for your condition, however, I know for mine, there are none. I do wear an ace bandage around the ankle in the house to get around better and it does help the foot drop and I do not have to wear those bulky AFO's around my house. I thought I would mention that, and also just let you know from the looks of all the responses you are not alone, and neither am I. Best Wishes!
A tendon transfer does not lock in your foot at a 90 deree angle. An ankle fusion locks in your ankle at 90 degrees. A tendon transfer simply stated moves temdons from one area of your foot to the top to keep your foot from dropping. Some have success retraining those transferred tendons to move up and some some. Therefore it is possible to have active motion (therefore it wont be locked). Some cannot retrain the tendons so the have passive motion. I had posterior tibial tendon transfer less than a week ago. If you have questions, please ask.
Hi Brent,

I'm real sorry to hear how bad things are going for you, hopefully they have improved from your last posting in 2005. I really hope you got to go to Disneyland and have full mobility and do everything you wanted to do.

I never realised that there would be much information on this condition online, I guess until you suffer from it you don't really fully understand how much it affects your everyday life. I had an accident 8 weeks ago and broke my leg in three places, the worst fracture being my fibula, I was really shocked and scared when I got my cast off 4 weeks ago and found my foot was paralysed and was told I would suffer from dropped foot.

I have an appointment to see my Consultant Doctor on Tuesday but feel very frightened as there has been very little improvement. I'm not able to do much in the house to look after my two children and partner without my foot getting very sore and swollen. I lost my baby in October too and feel real down and know I'm being quick tempered at times because of these two things happening.

I'd appreciate any advice you have, would be great to speak to someone going through the same thing.

Hope to hear from you soon, xoxo
Hello all :)

It's been 13 years and great to finally speak to people in a similar situation.

Long story short: When I was 18 my younger brother (god love him!) accidentally pushed me thru a glass door, the fall causing me to tear my sciatic nerve. Nerve reconstruction was a partial success but I still needed to wear a splint due to the drop foot.

A few months ago I stumbled across some information online about a tendon transfer and decided to make some inquiries. Last week I went for an EEG and the doc thinks I could be a suitable candidate for the op. At the moment I can push my foot down but not pull it up. The chap who did the EEG reckons I should be able to rectify that if the op is a success, meaning I wouldnt have to wear the splint any more which would mean so much to me.

Interested to hear more from Lynne or anyone else who's had the operation, what it involves, recovery time etc etc

Thanks :)
in april of 2004 i tore three ligements and the nerve in my right leg.. i have had the nerve graph/transfer done and i had no positive results. a year later i had my legaments repaired. March of 2007 i had a tendon transfer done. i have have been going through physical theriopy and now have gotten to 6 degrees lift. but i had a weird incident that for some reason i have no ability to lift my foot. (see my thread i posted just the other day about this). the tendon transfer is the best route to go. in my case, i am still waiting to find out what is resticting my foot from lifting. no tears or anything was what my doctor told me he saw on the MRI... so right now its a mystery.
good luck
[QUOTE=Th3rD 3yE;3008643]in april of 2004 i tore three ligements and the nerve in my right leg.. i have had the nerve graph/transfer done and i had no positive results. a year later i had my legaments repaired. March of 2007 i had a tendon transfer done. i have have been going through physical theriopy and now have gotten to 6 degrees lift. but i had a weird incident that for some reason i have no ability to lift my foot. (see my thread i posted just the other day about this). the tendon transfer is the best route to go. in my case, i am still waiting to find out what is resticting my foot from lifting. no tears or anything was what my doctor told me he saw on the MRI... so right now its a mystery.
good luck[/QUOTE]
Hey my name is zolange and i have dropped foot caused by a car accident i was in last year. I am having a tendon transfer on friday and i was wondering why if you say your having problems you also say its the best way out. I want to know what im up for.. please reply
hello everyone!

in aug 05 i was playing softball and dislocated my left knee rupturing my acl, pcl, acl and had extensive nerve damage resulting in a drop foot on my left foot. it took a year and a half to have the surgery to fix my knee and i am still left with a foot drop. i recently went to the doc who informed me that the nerve was shot and recommended a tendon transfer surgery but giving me little hope of returning back to the way i was pre injury. he said i had a 50% chance of being able to move my foot up at all and that the other time it might just be locked almost in a 90 degree angle. this it seems would solve my foot drop problem but would limit other areas mostly not being able to push my foot back down as far as it was before the tendon transfer. he wants to set up the surgery date in a few weeks but i have not given him the go ahead yet. i have been unable to find suffient evidence online on the success rates with this surgery and was wondering if anyone on here has had the surgery themselves and what kind of progress they have had. also, any info on the surgery would be appreciated as well!

thank you
Update: Went to see the consultant yesterday. News wasnt as good as I had been hoping and he thinks there might be no value in doing a tendon transfer as he's not convinced it will work. :(

He is talking about ankle fusion as a possible alternative but I really dont like the sound of that. Does anyone on here know any more about the procedure and/or after-effects??

Thanks
Gmac
well, heres my story and i'm sticking to it!

july 23rd 2006 at myrtle beach sc. 1st day of vacation! i hyperextended my knee playing nerf football on the beach. worse pain i've ever felt. went to the emergency room and after x-rays the doctor said "nothing is broken, maybe you tore your acl" well i came home and after an mri came the bad news. i ruptured the acl, pcl, and tore the lcl. pulled a chunk of bone out where the tendon was attached. and last but not least stretched the peroneal nerve.

my doc is the orthpedist for the st. louis steamers and team usa hockey. he's good. dr. farley. he said i could watch all the football i want and none of those guys squirming on the field will have as bad a knee injury as i've got. if my bone would have snapped it would have been easier!

after extensive knee reconstruction. five days in the hospital. (two ligaments were replaced with donor ligaments and one repaired) pt four days a week! i started walking the end of november with a cane. but, i still have no use of my foot. i had a nerve conduction study done last week and the result was negative. going on a year since the injury. i'm gonna give the nerve a few more months. they say after a year it's a slim to none chance of the nerve waking up if it's not making any progress.

the tendon transfer is the next step. i'm not looking forward to no weight bearing again. i've been wobbling around for six months now and do not wanna be a couch potatoe again! i keep my ankle stretched by leaning into the wall and keep the foot planted. it's still pretty loose. my toes are another story. very rigid up and down. i'll be 42 in october so my life is half over. i feel sorry for you younger guys. i wasn't real active when it happened. occasional softball or NERF football! anyway i feel your pain. it's scary not being able to walk right. my knee will never be the same but it does function. i just want my foot to work a little too.

god bless you all and good luck! just keep up the hope and always look at the good things. don't feel sorry for yourself, there is always someone worse off than you. think about the vets that are coming home from iraq with bad injuries and the sacrifice they made. some of those boys don't come home at all.

anyways good luck!
marty lamb
I also have foot drop from back surgeries. My calf has shrunk to a child's leg. Anyway, I have done PT for the leg drop, 2 different times. The therapist noticed that my pinkie toe and other smaller toes are taking over for the big toe/ankle. I still need to walk with a brace outside but, it seems the strength of the pinkie toe helps just enough around the house.
I also was a tournment softball player, and 35 it is depressing no longer competing. But, I just don't know if the foot drop surgery is worth it. I have enough pain in the leg from the back injury. I can't imagine that replacing the nerve is any better.
Hi everyone. In December 2002 I was injured during a football game (soccer for our American cousins!) I snapped my anterior cruciate, my lateral (the one on the outside of the knee) ligament and almost severed the peroneal nerve (I was 22 at the time and playing at semi-pro level). I had the knee re-construction done immediately and that was a good success my knee is very solid, but still suffered from foot drop. In August 2003 I underwent a nerve graft operation, i was cut from my ankle right upto half way up my hamstring, they grafted sensory nerves from my ankle and transplanted them into the peroneal nerve. That was 4 years ago and the foot is still exactly the same, no movement what so ever. For the past 4 years or so I have worn a splint (not sure of the name) which runs down the back of my calf and underneath the sole of my foot, this slots into most shoes that I have and allows me to walk just fine, my balance is a bit suspect sometimes especially after a couple of glasses of wine (or is that just coincidence?!!). Unfortunately I cant wear flip flops though! However, I live in England so there is not a great requirement for this sort of footwear anyway!! My splint is a white colour, which isnt a great confidence booster when wearing shorts. So last night I went on the web to look for something a little more sporty when I stumbled upon [url]www.#############.com[/url] - I wish I had been told about this surgery (the nerve transfer) 4 years ago, it looks a lot more promising than grafting. However, while looking at the website I read about the tendon transfer which I had never heard of before. I'm wondering whether it would be a good option for myself, although reading on here there seems to be a few sceptics about it. Anybody had or know of any positive results arising from it? It is not a nice thing to go through at all but we must take some positives out of it or we will drive ourselves crazy. I have always been sport crazy sometimes to the detriment of my family and love life as well as to my schooling. For me, the injury has allowed me to concentrate on my studies and an alternative career as well as spending time with my wonderful wife who has helped me incredibly through it all. Not to mention my golf game and handicap has come on amazingly!!! Good luck everybody!! Andrew.
Hello all,

Am pencilled in for a tendon transfer of the posterior tibial tendon on October 1 - yikes!

Still not 100 percent sure of what the procedure involves and the rehabilitation involved apart from 6 weeks with my foot in a cast.

Any other info would be gratefully received and I'll similarly update this thread if I hear any more. :)
Hey everyone!

I don't have a cool story with my peroneal nerve problems, except peripheral neuropathy.

Top of one foot is completely numb. Nobody knows why it's happening. I also get major stabbing pains in my foot all the way up to my hips.

That part is getting much worse - doesn't take much walking to end up not being able to sit down.
[QUOTE=Lynn1991NY;2853910]I am 6 weeks post op tendon transfer. Do not know if the original posters are still following this. if they are, I would love to know what they did such as surgery etc?[/QUOTE]

hi i just also had to surgery for the drop foot and was wondering how your recovery went and your results. I am currently in a walking cast about 7 1/2 weeks out from surgery. I really nerve/excited to see the results.
[QUOTE=smartin37;3228219]hi i just also had to surgery for the drop foot and was wondering how your recovery went and your results. I am currently in a walking cast about 7 1/2 weeks out from surgery. I really nerve/excited to see the results.[/QUOTE]

Hi Smartin,

Hope your surgery went well. I am due to have a similar operation later this year and would be keen to hear how the procedure went, how long it took, the immediate after-effects, how long you were in hospital, pain levels, mobility etc at the start.

My doctors havent given me much information so anything you can supply would be very much appreciated!

Gmac
[QUOTE=gmac1975;3228870]Hi Smartin,

Hope your surgery went well. I am due to have a similar operation later this year and would be keen to hear how the procedure went, how long it took, the immediate after-effects, how long you were in hospital, pain levels, mobility etc at the start.

My doctors havent given me much information so anything you can supply would be very much appreciated!

Gmac[/QUOTE]

Hi,
I would love to find some information on this also. I went to see my consultant this week about the posteria tibial tendon transfer and he said I would be a good candidate for the op. I am reluctant to have it done straight away as I have no information on the procedure. Am I right in thinking you have re-train your foot to 'pick up'? My surgeon gave me the impression that you would have to tell your foot to press down in order for it to lift up????:confused: Any info anyone has would be really appreciated. Good luck to those going through the process at the moment.
hey gmac and kippa, i was told by one surgeon about the whole opposite reaction that if you think up it will go down but with my surgery i dont think its going to be like that. my surgery was called a bridle surgery where the took part of 3 tendons, 2 towards the back of my ankle and one on the side running up towards my big toe. they then put them all from my bone on my calf just above the ankle ot the top of my foot like a brldle for a horse. this is to keep my foot at 90 degrees at all times like an internal AFO. i go back on the 19th to see the results and have an MRI. I was in the hospital for one night. I have a 10 wk recovery with 5 weeks on crutches and the last 5 walking. I feel great now but i must admit the first 2 weeks were no fun. THe pain coming out of the surgery was pretty bad but was controlled soon. There wasn't too much pain just soreness after the first 2 days. I had my surgery done at Stanford Hospital in California with a great doctor, Loretta Chou. I highly suggest her but want to wait til i see the results to fully suggest her. I think that we all should have a chance to fix this stupid nerve problem, im only 21 years old and dont want to have to deal with it the rest of my life so this was the best bet!
[QUOTE=smartin37;3235168]hey gmac and kippa, i was told by one surgeon about the whole opposite reaction that if you think up it will go down but with my surgery i dont think its going to be like that. my surgery was called a bridle surgery where the took part of 3 tendons, 2 towards the back of my ankle and one on the side running up towards my big toe. they then put them all from my bone on my calf just above the ankle ot the top of my foot like a brldle for a horse. this is to keep my foot at 90 degrees at all times like an internal AFO. i go back on the 19th to see the results and have an MRI. I was in the hospital for one night. I have a 10 wk recovery with 5 weeks on crutches and the last 5 walking. I feel great now but i must admit the first 2 weeks were no fun. THe pain coming out of the surgery was pretty bad but was controlled soon. There wasn't too much pain just soreness after the first 2 days. I had my surgery done at Stanford Hospital in California with a great doctor, Loretta Chou. I highly suggest her but want to wait til i see the results to fully suggest her. I think that we all should have a chance to fix this stupid nerve problem, im only 21 years old and dont want to have to deal with it the rest of my life so this was the best bet![/QUOTE]

hi smartin, thanks for all the information and good luck going forward. i hope you will come back on here and post your progress as it would be great to hear how you're getting on.

all i know about my planned op is that they will take a tendon from the back of my leg and move it to the front. or maybe the other way around! as you can see i'm not awash with information. :D

i was told my foot would be in plaster for 6 weeks and then maybe i would need a foot walker or something for a few weeks after that. the op is due to take a few hours and then a night in hospital.

i actually had my accident where i suffered the drop foot 13 yrs ago but only discovered tendon transfers earlier this year - just wish someone had mentioned it sooner! i'm told the worst that can happen is the transfer doesnt take and its back to the status quo. at least i get 6 weeks off work if nothing else :jester:

kippa - would be good to hear your progress too.
Hi everyone, I thought I would share this email with you all. After reading some of the posts on here I had several questions regarding the tendon transfer, so I thought I would email my surgeon with the queries. I am currently pencilied in for a Mid Feb operation. I didnt want it to spoil Christmas!! The first paragraph is my initial email to my surgeons secretary, this is followed by the typed up dictated response from my surgeon. I hope it is of help. Intersted to know how your recovery is going smartin37? Have you gone in yet Gmac?

Basically, I am a little confused as to what (if successful) the end outcome of the operation would be. Will the tendon transfer act as an internal AFO for example, keeping the foot in a more horizontal position? However, Professor Kay did mention that "self - lifting" (dorsi flexion - I think??) of the foot may be possible through this procedure, would this affect the ability to press the foot down? I have also read that 5-6 years after a successful tendon transfer the stability is prone to fail, this is something I forgot to ask professor Kay last time. I have tried endlessly to find some information about this but to no avail. If you could point me in the direction of some reading material that would be most appreciated.

Reply from Professor Kay

Andrea passed your email on to me.

In terms of results from tibialis posterior transfer, this is a rare operation but by an allergy with other tendon transfers the degree of movement that is obtained can be variable and in some cases it works as an internal AFO. However, in the best cases with good rehabilitation and care I would expect that you would get active movement to the foot which would be valuable. From a purely logical point of view if you do get active movement rather than static internal splinting then that result should be enduring. Whilst result from internal splinting can decay with time.

I would be happy to research a surgeon with greater experience than me in this surgery if you wish, but since it is a relatively rare procedure in everybodies practice I am not sure how successful I willl be but I will gladly ask around.

With very best wishes
Thanks Kippa, that was good to read although, typical doctor - his reply is so vague its untrue! I've found it so hard to get concrete information about the procedure. I think the truth is its quite a rare operation and so they cant really say for sure what the outcome will be. Cheers for the post anyway and if you hear any more please let us know.

I had delayed my operation until Dec 17 but since arranging that I've started a new job and havent run it past my new employers yet whether that would be a good time for me to be off for 2-3 weeks (or longer). So I may have to delay it again.

Like you I've been trying to find out more information but my surgeon and the hospital have both been hopeless so far. My questions are things like:

- how long does the procedure take?
- what will the recovery time be like?
- how long afterwards will I be bed-ridden?
- at what point can I return to work?
- how long do I need to wear a cast?
- what will happen after that?
- at what point can they gauge if it has been a success etc etc??

If you or anyone else knows the answers to these then I'd be very grateful to know! :)

Cheers
G
Typical doctor is right mate!! they are a nightmare aren't they?! However, my email has provoked some fore-thought from the surgeon and he has written to a Nick Harris who apparentley has experience of the surgery. As and when I receive any info from him I will certainly post it on here for you.

As for your questions I do know that the procedure would last around 3-4 hours and I am certainly required to stay in the hospital for 2 nights. I've also been told that I would be in a cast for 6 weeks, of which 2 of those weeks should be complete bed rest. After the cast comes off you should anticipate a further 1-2 weeks before you can drive, there is also a period of 6 weeks of physiotherapy required after the cast is removed. Unfortunately that is as much as I know.

Kippa.
hello again everybody. i had a tendon transfer done on july 17th of this year and i am having good results. the surgery lasted about 3 hours and i stayed in the hospital just one night. i originally injured myself in august of 05 playing softball. i dislocated my left knee and ruptured my acl, pcl, and lcl. right after the injury the doctors told me i had drop foot. it took me a year before my knee surgery and then 7 more months to have the tendon transfer done. they made five incisions on my foot. 1 cut on teh right side of my left foot, 1 directly up from the first on on teh side of my calf, 1 where the ankle meets the leg in the middle, 1 cut on the left side of my left foot and they also cut part of my calf to allow for my foot to come back up to a 90 degree angle.( my achilles had become shorter and thicker from not stretching it everyday.) it seems they took two tendons from the first cut and tied it into the middle of my leg down to the middle of the foot right above pinky toe and the one next to it. this helps pull it up from the left side as opposed to from the big toe side. i spent 6 weeks in a plaster cast without any weight bearing at all. i then got a walking boot after the sixth week and was able to walk on the foot. i also had to go for 2 months of physical therapy which i am wrapping up this week in fact. i have noticed increased strength and stability after having this procedure done. i have not tripped yet which was a big problem before the surgery. and i am able to pull my foot up somewhat. they say i should be able to pull it up a little more once i regain some muscle strength in my leg. you will not be able to point your foot down like you probably could before the surgery but there is some downward movement, but this is to be expected since they took tendons and moved them to hold your foot up, you should expect it to be hard to push them back down. i am really pleased i had this surgery done and i hope this help somebody. i hope you all get better and are able to resume some of your activities in the future that u may have lost in the past.
Hi Mike, thanks for posting. It sounds like your operation has been a big success so far.

Can I ask: did you have to wear a splint before? And do they reckon you will be able to do without it once you are back to full strength? That is the key for me. Not only is my splint a real pain, it has given me no end of secondary problems with my foot and leg.

I am delaying my operation now til Feb/March next year cos of work commitments so hopefully you will have a better idea of how you're going by then. I asked my hospital 3 weeks ago for information and I'm still waiting to hear back! :mad:
i did have a plastic foot brace that i wore inside my shoe. this was extrememly uncomfortable. it actually made my knee more unstable and had a lot of pain in my foot from the device itself. eventually no other devices are needed in the future. all i have to do now is build the strength up in my leg. i lost alot of muscle strenght in my calf, front of leg that pulls the foot by the toes up, and in quad and hamstring. they say with the increased muscle strength, i should be good to go! keep your hopes up and work hard after the surgery, it is worth it in the end!
[COLOR="DarkRed"][FONT="Arial"][B]After reading all of this thread, I must admit that I'm quite a bit more worried than I was before. I had right total hip replacement surgery on 9/11/07 and my sciatic nerve was stretched by the retractor. I've had total drop foot since then with no improvement. I can feel just a bit on the inside of my foot, ankle and calf but I can't move any toes or my foot. I have been in a custom-made white plastic AFO since 11/26 and it does allow me to walk slowly and drive. I'm grateful to have it!!

My orthopedic surgeon has told me that we will have a nerve conduction survey and EMG at 6 months if there is no improvement but now I'm wondering if that might be too late. He told me that I might be a candidate for a tendon transfer so I started researching that. In the process, I found a website of a plastic surgeon in Houston who does nerve transfers, a part of the tibial nerve transferred to the peroneal nerve. He states that the tibial nerve allows for "stepping on the gas" while transferring only part of it to the peroneal nerve would allow for the "lifting up" on the gas pedal. I'm not sure that would even work for me because my tibial nerve obviously isn't working since I can't press my foot down. He states that surgery should occur between 4-6 months post injury for best results and I'm currently about 3.5 months post-op. If he's correct, I don't have a lot of time.

One other thing that may be complicating matters is the fact that at the time of surgery, I also contracted a non-MRSA infection in the wound. They opened me back up 2.5 weeks after the initial surgery to irrigate and debride the wound. Samples were taken of the joint itself and staph was present there. That's why my surgeon believes that the infection started in the operating room. It showed itself very quickly and was deep in the joint. A person on another forum who's gone through having an infection post-total hip replacement stated that the inflammation in the joint could be inhibiting the natural repair of the nerve because it travels through that inflamed area.

Do any of y'all have any experience with this? I don't have an injury as y'all have per se but rather a simple stretching of the nerve. However, I have read that the higher up the injury, the less likely the nerve is to repair itself. I don't regret having my hip replaced because I now have no pain in the joint itself and my lower back is much better. I have maintained almost complete optimism throughout all of this but after reading what y'all have said here, I'm feeling discouraged for the first time. I'm going through some personal issues as a result of my Mom's death last January and my father turning ugly toward me so my faith and my wonderful husband and brother have kept me going. I guess I've refrained from doing much research until now because I was afraid of getting discouraged. I want to have hope and I want to be able to accept whatever God's will is for me. I'm 38 and didn't marry my wonderful husband until the age of 36. It took quite a bit of time for God to send me my husband. We put off trying to have children until I got my hip fixed and now we can't try until we get the infection cleared up. I don't want to try to get pregnant if I might be looking at a surgery that can't be put off for 9 months. I'll be in the position of choosing my child over my foot and the answer to that is unquestionably my child. I really don't know what to do or what to expect so I would sincerely appreciate any advice or information any of y'all have to give.

I wish the absolute best to all of y'all,
Rebecca in Texas[/B][/FONT][/COLOR]
Hello All,

I'm sorry for all of your pain and wish you all the best luck in recovery.

I am here on behalf of my four and a half year old daughter who has had unexplained drop foot for some time now, since she was one and a half.

She had surgery last year to remove scar tissue from her nerve and we just had another EMG today that shows no improvement in the last seven months. We were getting tiny bit of recovery showing up to seven months after her surgery but then it suddenly stopped.

The doctors now want to tell us to give up hope of any more recovery. I hope and pray they are wrong.

As for tendon transfers, were have been told they are not a good idea for younger children because they could cause problems with growth.

We have been doing threshold electrical stimulation at night for the muscles.

I'm very upset today and I'm crying.

I'd like to join your discussion to offer and share advice.
[QUOTE=mom444;3372110]Hello All,

I'm sorry for all of your pain and wish you all the best luck in recovery.

I am here on behalf of my four and a half year old daughter who has had unexplained drop foot for some time now, since she was one and a half.

She had surgery last year to remove scar tissue from her nerve and we just had another EMG today that shows no improvement in the last seven months. We were getting tiny bit of recovery showing up to seven months after her surgery but then it suddenly stopped.

The doctors now want to tell us to give up hope of any more recovery. I hope and pray they are wrong.

As for tendon transfers, were have been told they are not a good idea for younger children because they could cause problems with growth.

We have been doing threshold electrical stimulation at night for the muscles.

I'm very upset today and I'm crying.

I'd like to join your discussion to offer and share advice.[/QUOTE]

[COLOR="DarkRed"][FONT="Arial"][B]Oh Mom444, I really wish that I had some really good advice for you. My heart breaks for you and all I can say is that I hope that y'all never give up hope. And by all means, cry when you need to. I've shed some tears mainly out of frustration. I refuse to give up hope myself.

I'm just so sorry that your baby is going through this. However, I can't help but think about how resilient children are. I wouldn't be surprised in the least to come back on this board to read your post telling us that there has been improvement. Please don't give up hope. Y'all are in my prayers.

Take care,
Rebecca in Texas[/B][/FONT][/COLOR]
[QUOTE=RebeccaG;3372145][COLOR="DarkRed"][FONT="Arial"][B]Oh Mom444, I really wish that I had some really good advice for you. My heart breaks for you and all I can say is that I hope that y'all never give up hope. And by all means, cry when you need to. I've shed some tears mainly out of frustration. I refuse to give up hope myself.

I'm just so sorry that your baby is going through this. However, I can't help but think about how resilient children are. I wouldn't be surprised in the least to come back on this board to read your post telling us that there has been improvement. Please don't give up hope. Y'all are in my prayers.

Take care,
Rebecca in Texas[/B][/FONT][/COLOR][/QUOTE]

Thank yoiu Rebecca... It's comforting to hear your words.

And I hope and pray that you too get some more recovery and I wish you also the best for you and your family.

I'll keep checking in with all of you to check your progress.
Rebecca/Mom - hope you guys are both further forward in your search for information. It is perhaps the most frustrating thing as I have found myself. Noone seems to want or is able to tell you how things will go!

After 2 delays due to a new job, I have been pencilled in again for March 31. I have just told my boss and I hope it will go ahead this time. I really dont have a lot of information apart from it's a short operation, one night in hospital and then 6 weeks in plaster and lots of physio. I've tried in vain to get hold of the surgeon via phone or email but no joy. Instead a nurse told me the pain shouldnt be intolerable and that I wouldnt require to be bed-bound for any lenght of time. I've had 14 years of on-going problems with splints, foot drop etc that I'm willing to take the risk. A consultant told me when I first enquired about it that the worst-case scenario was it didnt work and I was back to status quo. If thats the worst it can get then I'm all for it.

Plus I get time off work :D

Will keep you all updated. Would love to hear again from those about to take the plunge too or those who have already been thru it.

gmac :)
Hello everyone,

Just thought i would drop you a line to update you on my situation. I am going in for my tendon transfer on tuesday (19th feb 08), i am due to be in for a 2 night stay. following my meeting with the second surgeon he advised me that a tendon transfer which would allow me to dorsi flex (lift up) my foot again would not be suitable in this case, as he would have to cut the only two healthy tendons i have around the foot / ankle area. He also mentioned that that type of transfer sometimes kicks the foot out to the side due to the tendons being too tight.

He is going to perform a static tendon transfer which will basically act as an internal AFO. the tendons will be brought up either side of the leg (bringing the foot into a 90 degree position) akin to the bridals on a horse. he will then drill through my tibia and thread the tendons through the hole before suturing them to the bone, this will keep the foot horizontal.

the worse case scenario is that i end up as i am now, with foot drop and wearing an AFO. It will be 6 weeks in plaster and 4 weeks in an ankle walking boot. there is no physio required with this procedure as it is static and doesnt require re-training the foot to pick up via other tendons.

hope this is of help.

Andi.
[COLOR="DarkRed"][FONT="Arial"][B]Kippa and gmac,

Best wishes on your procedures!!! I know that you both are looking forward to improving your situations and I really do hope that you both have good experiences.

My foot drop has not changed at all. I've gotten no more feeling back and still have no ability to move my ankle or my toes. On March 12th, I'll go back to see my surgeon about this and he'll probably send me for a nerve conductivity study and EMG. I'm not sure where we'll go from there.

Again, I wish y'all the best!!!

Rebecca in Texas[/B][/FONT][/COLOR]
Rebecca - Thanks for the good wishes. I hope you find a solution soon.

Andi - Quite interested by your recent update. Does this mean you are having an ankle fusion? If you wont be able to dorsi flex what will be the main benefits of having the operation? Will it keep your foot at 90degrees all the time? All the very best with the surgery, fingers crossed for you :)
Many thanks for the well wishes rebecca. The feeling is mutual.

G-mac - Hiya mate. Now this is not an ankle fusion first of all. As im sure you know that is a very intrusive operation and completley restricts the ankle. Yes, the foot will remain at 90 degrees all the time, but it will still allow you to press down slightly against the tendons holding it up. it basically acts as an internal AFO, via the transfer of tendons. The tendon transfer which incoporates dorsi flexion is done by cutting length ways down your achilles tendon and also the tendon that connects your leg and the inside of your foot near the heel. As i said earlier my surgeon says these two tendons are perfectly healthy in my case so it would seem risky to operate on these. he also said that re-learning the foot to dorsi flex via this procedure is extremely hard going as an adult, as it go's against everything your brain has already learnt. He would recommend (and has performed) it to children who naturally seem more adept at picking this up more quickly. The operation he is performing on me is relatively new and he only started performing them 2 years ago, in which time he has had 6 success stories. His name is Nick Harris from spire hospital, roundhay, Leeds if that is of any use.

the main benfit for me is that i will be able to walk in bare feet (without the AFO) as i do when wearing the AFO. And obviously wearing the AFO with shoes should become obselete. I cant really imagine it after 5 years wearing it however, and to be honest with you i am struggling to imagine the final outcome. But, if the worst case scenario is i am as i am now then that is good enough for me.

if i can be of anymore use please let me know.
Andi - Thanks for the update. First up, I have to say it's good you are so well informed. I am kinda stumbling into my op blindly. I havent seen a specialist for about 6 months and have pretty much forgotten what they told me back then! But, like you, if the worst case scenario is back to where we are now then there's not much to lose.

so, is the hope that you will be able to walk with or without shoes without an AFO? from what you describe it doesnt sound any worse than the operation to fix the dorsi flexion, maybe even better. i might try to contact your guy to see what he thinks about my own individual case.

I am seeing a Dr Stuart Moir in Glasgow although, slightly worringly, it was actually his colleague rather than him who seeemd keen to proceed at first. i get the feeling Mr Moir isnt too confident the whole thing will work. It is nearly 14 years since I had my accident tho so anything they can do now will be an improvement.

Good luck again for Tuesday and if you get a chance next week to come on and tell us how it went then please do so.

Graeme
Graeme - No problem. It takes a lot of banging your head against a brick wall sometimes doesn't it?! When I first found out about this operation I went back to the guy who performed my peroneal nerve graft, and he was happy to go ahead and do the tendon transfer (that allows dorsi flexion). It wasnt untill i pushed him for answers to a few questions and asked him to ask around as he finally admitted that he had never performed one, that he (i think) finally admitted defeat and consulted with someone with more experience. I went to see the new guy (nick harris) and his office was opposite the door to my nerve guy! i was furious. But hey (and this go's for everyone reading this i suppose) the morale of the story is trust your own body and judgement, after all these guys are only human after all.

your assumption about being able to walk without the AFO wether with or without shoes is correct.

good luck with everything and keep pushing for answers i say!!

thanks for the well wishes and ill try and check back next week. of course im assuming i wont know the outcome of the op untill the cast comes off in 6 weeks, but hey at least ill be able to tell you about the pain or something!

cheers, Andi
Hi everyone. I was doing a search and found this thread that I posted to a long time ago. I am now 1 yr and 1 month post op tendon transfer on my drop foot with mixed results. I had to have a small revision surgery this past November because the screw in the top of my foot was coming out. It should have dissolved post op but did not so the surgeon when in, tightened some tendons and put in a new screw.

I still choose to walk with a brace which is not where I hoped to be. I just feel after an hour or even less, I have my foot feeling very tired and I have to work too hard to walk.

I see my surgeon on Tuesday and will share my complaints but I am sick and tired of PT and tired of this whole condition that I have had to deal with for over 2 years....sorry for the frustration but at 36, this is not what I wanted to deal with after all the surgeries to try and fix it.

If people have questions about the surgery or recovery, feel free to ask.
Hi Kippa10; this is my first time on the site, and I am so excited to find that there are other people out there who can relate to me and what I'm going through. My problem started with a right hip replacement last July, and ended with a damaged sciatic nerve. Of course I didn't know at the time that I had nerve damage, as my surgeon put it, "my nerve was just pissed off!!!" I woke up from surgery with numbness, tingling, and toes that I couldn't raise upwards. I was told my foot would be normal in 3 to 4 days, then 3 to 4 weeks. Now it's Feb. I was frustrated, I was depressed, pissed. My 15 and 16 yr kids were taking care of me. I couldn't drive, my independence was gone! I was angry! It didn't make sense to me, my nerves were pissed off! What does that mean? So I did what I thought any sane person would do. I got a second opinion. I found out that there are nerve tests which can determine the causation of the damage. Suddenly, I felt a little brighter. There's something about knowing what's going on with your body. Now I'm faced with several possibilities, including the moving around of the tendons. That's were you come in. I want to say that, I don't know if you're a spiritual person, but I want to thank GOD for you.:angel: Your message really let me know that, not only am I on the right track, but it also lets me know that all of my pain and suffering, and hard work, and the fact that I never gave up, right when I was ready to give up; there's always hope. Keep blessing people with your testimony. shy742
On 1/11/08 I slipped, and due to the really weird nature of the slip, I dislocated my right knee. I tore 3 ligaments, the ACL, PCL and LCL as well as tearing a tendon on the back side of my knee.

But the worst of it all, is the nerve damage that has occurred. Catastrophic is a good word to use. I have no dorsal movement of my right foot, nor can I push outwards, and parts of the side of my right leg and top of my foot are numb. After the accident, I now suffer from what the thread title says...."Drop Foot". I have to wear a boot to keep my foot straight to prevent my calf from atrophy.

At first, they diagnosed it as being a stretched peroneal nerve, and said it would heal and get better over time. I didn't understand, while being in the hospital for 4 days, why I never got to see a neurologist. The only answer I get now from my Ortho is "Nerve damage is just a waiting game, I didn't see a reason to."

Well...I got a referral from my family doctor and went to see a Neurologist. He immediately diagnosed the Peroneal nerve damage, but ordered 2 MRIs and an EMG just to be sure. The MRIs weren't so bad...one I was out some..the other I had to be all the way in for....but I could tolerate it. The EMG was bad...very painful. The needles werent so bad, except for the ones he had to put into my back. But the electric shock part of it was pretty excruciating.

Unfortunately for me, the Neurologist was surprised when he found that I had just as much nerve damage above my knee as I did below. This indicates that not only do I have Peroneal nerve damage, but also damage to my Plexis cluster of nerves. I was then sent for a CT Scan of my pelvis and abdomen to confirm what he thought. The results did confirm it, as I went to see a Neurosurgeon at the Neurologists recommendation.

The news he gave me was pretty grim. He said my chances of getting the movement back are very slim, due to there being damage to 2 places, both of which control part of that functionality in my foot. There are surgical options, but the repair of my ligaments has to come first. I should be having that surgery in a few weeks.

The nerve pain is possibly the worst pain I have ever felt. It is sharp, comes from nowhere and is phantom. I am currenty on Lyrica for it, and it seems to be helping. The hardest part right now is not giving in to the part of me that wants to give up. The part that wonders why and how this happened to me, just how I did this much damage just trying to help someone carry water bottles on a wet, raining night....and why? I know there's no answers to those questions...but the most difficult thing for me right now is not giving up.

It seems there are many others here who are somewhat in my situation. I am hoping to find help and support here as well as trying to help and support others. I know I am not alone in this, even though sometimes it truly does feel like I am.
I highly recommend going to the same doctor who performed the EMG and having it done several times over a period of 6-12 months to see if there is any repair going on. If not, then surgery is an option for the peroneal.
I have another EMG scheduled for 7 weeks from now to see if there is any improvement.

You are in the city I see Lynn...Im out on the island.
Hi fellow NYer....I went to HSS for most of my surgeries and Montefiore for EMGs. Go often for the EMGs often (not one time) and make sure they check you thoroughly. My first EMG was not comprehensive enough and I had one unecessary surgery (nerve release in my knee) because of it. Basically they (an EMG 'specialist' at a hospital) checked my knee down when they should have checked for activity in my back, thigh area and then down. I switched specialists and was going every 2-3 months for testing hoping there would be a spark of activity. There never was. I wish you better luck.
[QUOTE=Lynn1991NY;3455902]Hi fellow NYer....I went to HSS for most of my surgeries and Montefiore for EMGs. Go often for the EMGs often (not one time) and make sure they check you thoroughly. My first EMG was not comprehensive enough and I had one unecessary surgery (nerve release in my knee) because of it. Basically they (an EMG 'specialist' at a hospital) checked my knee down when they should have checked for activity in my back, thigh area and then down. I switched specialists and was going every 2-3 months for testing hoping there would be a spark of activity. There never was. I wish you better luck.[/QUOTE]

I went to a suggested Neurologist who did the EMG himself (his Tech did the shock part, he did the needles) and he did a very thorough job from what I have been told. Originally like I said, it was thought that I only had nerve damage down below the knee, and he found the bad damage above the knee as well. He even did cross tests on my left leg for comparison and also found a very small amount of nerve damage in my lower back, but that he said could have been there for a very long time as it was extremely faint.

He seems genuinely concerned about my health and nerve damage. He calls every week or so to see how I am making out and in general is a very very nice man who, in a sea of doctors who don't really seem to care all that much, seems to genuinely be concerned for my well being. Also, the Neurosurgeon he recommended me to is supposed to be one of the top in his field and he is ordering an EMG every 2 months or so to check up on the nerves.

I'm sorry to hear your nerves never healed. That is pretty much the prognosis with me, though I can keep hoping. The Neurosurgeon said there were a few courses we could take to get rid of the drop foot if it doesn't come back on it's own, but that is way in the future.
[QUOTE=kippa10;3441273]Hello everyone,

Just thought i would drop you a line to update you on my situation. I am going in for my tendon transfer on tuesday (19th feb 08), i am due to be in for a 2 night stay. following my meeting with the second surgeon he advised me that a tendon transfer which would allow me to dorsi flex (lift up) my foot again would not be suitable in this case, as he would have to cut the only two healthy tendons i have around the foot / ankle area. He also mentioned that that type of transfer sometimes kicks the foot out to the side due to the tendons being too tight.

He is going to perform a static tendon transfer which will basically act as an internal AFO. the tendons will be brought up either side of the leg (bringing the foot into a 90 degree position) akin to the bridals on a horse. he will then drill through my tibia and thread the tendons through the hole before suturing them to the bone, this will keep the foot horizontal.

the worse case scenario is that i end up as i am now, with foot drop and wearing an AFO. It will be 6 weeks in plaster and 4 weeks in an ankle walking boot. there is no physio required with this procedure as it is static and doesnt require re-training the foot to pick up via other tendons.

hope this is of help.

Andi.[/QUOTE]

Hi Andi,

Just wondering how the surgery went? And how things have been for you since? Hope everything has gone well for you.

I emailed your man in Leeds and they have offered to see me at their clinic. Tempted to go just to get a 2nd opinion before my op at the end of March.

Cheers
Graeme
Small update here also.

I am going in for Ligament and Tendon reconstruction surgery this Tuesday, March 4th. This is the first surgery I have ever had, so you could say I'm just a little on the nervous side. Would figure...for the first surgery I ever have to have, it's a 5-6 hour marathon which requires a large incision on the right side of my right leg.

I am being held overnight for observation so I should be home by Wednesday evening.

It's strange...I am having surgery to correct some major problems in my knee and am actually losing mobility due to it. Right now I can do a 110 degree bend of my knee and can put some weight on it and "walk" using the walker. After the surgery, my brace gets locked at 0 degrees for 2 weeks and its back to hopping around...
[QUOTE=Lynn1991NY;3446428]Hi everyone. I was doing a search and found this thread that I posted to a long time ago. I am now 1 yr and 1 month post op tendon transfer on my drop foot with mixed results. I had to have a small revision surgery this past November because the screw in the top of my foot was coming out. It should have dissolved post op but did not so the surgeon when in, tightened some tendons and put in a new screw.

I still choose to walk with a brace which is not where I hoped to be. I just feel after an hour or even less, I have my foot feeling very tired and I have to work too hard to walk.

I see my surgeon on Tuesday and will share my complaints but I am sick and tired of PT and tired of this whole condition that I have had to deal with for over 2 years....sorry for the frustration but at 36, this is not what I wanted to deal with after all the surgeries to try and fix it.

If people have questions about the surgery or recovery, feel free to ask.[/QUOTE]

Hi Lynn...

I'm from New York too and have dropped foot since November due to a broken bone and further hip surgery. I would just like to know what the surgery was like for the tendon transfer...are you in a cast, how long did you stay in the hospital, how was the pain...anything you can think of would be helpful. Believe me, unless you actually have this condition, you can never imagine how painful and disabling it is, and I send my best wishes to you for a successful and speedy recovery. I am also curious if anyone ever recommended nerve transfer surgery to you during the 6 to 8 months after the foot drop developed. Thanks for any info you can provide and feel better...Tanya
[QUOTE=Tanya8;3467460]Hi Lynn...

I'm from New York too and have dropped foot since November due to a broken bone and further hip surgery. I would just like to know what the surgery was like for the tendon transfer...are you in a cast, how long did you stay in the hospital, how was the pain...anything you can think of would be helpful. Believe me, unless you actually have this condition, you can never imagine how painful and disabling it is, and I send my best wishes to you for a successful and speedy recovery. I am also curious if anyone ever recommended nerve transfer surgery to you during the 6 to 8 months after the foot drop developed. Thanks for any info you can provide and feel better...Tanya[/QUOTE]


I agree, unless someone has had drop foot, they really can't quite imagine what it's like. There are things out there to help it, like an AFO. An AFO is basically a leaf spring that attaches to your calf and slips into your shoe/sneaker and goes underneath your foot. It has some flex to it, and basically keeps your foot "up" instead of dragging on the ground. You can walk normally with it and it has some tension so that it will "spring" your foot back up after taking a step. There isn't any actual springs involved, it's just a piece of plastic molded a certain way. I have used one at my PT sessions and let me tell you, even though the one I used wasn't molded to me specifically (any one you get will be molded to your specific build), it helps a TON.

I really hope both of you get better or find some way around it. I know exactly how you both feel and wish you all the best.
[QUOTE=Clonexx;3468389]I agree, unless someone has had drop foot, they really can't quite imagine what it's like. There are things out there to help it, like an AFO. An AFO is basically a leaf spring that attaches to your calf and slips into your shoe/sneaker and goes underneath your foot. It has some flex to it, and basically keeps your foot "up" instead of dragging on the ground. You can walk normally with it and it has some tension so that it will "spring" your foot back up after taking a step. There isn't any actual springs involved, it's just a piece of plastic molded a certain way. I have used one at my PT sessions and let me tell you, even though the one I used wasn't molded to me specifically (any one you get will be molded to your specific build), it helps a TON.

I really hope both of you get better or find some way around it. I know exactly how you both feel and wish you all the best.[/QUOTE]


Hi Clonexx...I just found your reply, so as you can see I'm not too good in getting around this site. If my calculations are correct, you are having your tendon surgery today and I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you. The very best of luck, and I hope you're home by Wednesday.

Thanks for the information about the AFO. The one you describe from your PT sessions sounds great, but I really hate mine . It is solid plastic with the bend at the foot/ankle to keep the foot at ninety degrees, but it is very rigid and I feel it actually stops me from walking better. Since I could not bear any weight for 6 weeks on the foot, and then only 50% for another 8 weeks, the leg and foot have gotten very little exercise. I have to wear my current brace to prevent the tendons in the back from getting any shorter and have been told it that I will get used to it....right...it is sooo uncomfortable. Please let me know how you are doing and a very speedy recovery!
I have been monitoring this thread ince I cut my peroneal nerve causing a drop foot on December1, 2006. I was not a candidate for a nerve transfer so my Dr. recommended a tendon transfer however he suggested that I wait for at least 12 months to see how much movement I regained on my own. Being impatient I didn't want to hear this I wanted it fixed now. So after waiting I realized he knew what he wa talking about because what movement I did have got alot stronger, which i neceary for best results in the tendon tranfer. After using my AFO for a year I had my tendon transfer surgery on January 29,2008. I am on week six with my cast and I'm ready to get rid of it. I have had very little pain since about the first four days, I haven't had to take any pain medication at all. After the surgery my Dr. talk me that the wait wa worth it because my tendons were much stronger then he expected. My cast comes off March 10 so I guess I'll ind out then how well it went.
All the post have helped me to understand I'm not alone with my problem I jut wanted to say thanks.
[QUOTE=DanhanO6;3471179]I have been monitoring this thread ince I cut my peroneal nerve causing a drop foot on December1, 2006. I was not a candidate for a nerve transfer so my Dr. recommended a tendon transfer however he suggested that I wait for at least 12 months to see how much movement I regained on my own. Being impatient I didn't want to hear this I wanted it fixed now. So after waiting I realized he knew what he wa talking about because what movement I did have got alot stronger, which i neceary for best results in the tendon tranfer. After using my AFO for a year I had my tendon transfer surgery on January 29,2008. I am on week six with my cast and I'm ready to get rid of it. I have had very little pain since about the first four days, I haven't had to take any pain medication at all. After the surgery my Dr. talk me that the wait wa worth it because my tendons were much stronger then he expected. My cast comes off March 10 so I guess I'll ind out then how well it went.
All the post have helped me to understand I'm not alone with my problem I jut wanted to say thanks.[/QUOTE]


Hi Danhan,

Thanks for all of the information about the tendon transfer. I don't know if I'm a candidate for nerve or tendon transfer, but I'll be finding out if I am in the coming months. Please keep me posted about your success and how you're doing. Hope you can throw that old AFO out, and best wishes for your speedy recovery!
[QUOTE=Tanya8;3467460]Hi Lynn...

I'm from New York too and have dropped foot since November due to a broken bone and further hip surgery. I would just like to know what the surgery was like for the tendon transfer...are you in a cast, how long did you stay in the hospital, how was the pain...anything you can think of would be helpful. Believe me, unless you actually have this condition, you can never imagine how painful and disabling it is, and I send my best wishes to you for a successful and speedy recovery. I am also curious if anyone ever recommended nerve transfer surgery to you during the 6 to 8 months after the foot drop developed. Thanks for any info you can provide and feel better...Tanya[/QUOTE]

Tanya: I was in the hospital 2 days after my tendon transfer. The surgery was 4 hours but I was 'out' so I don't remember any of it. I was on morphine for a bit but I was itching like crazy so at first they gave me benadryl but the combo of benadryl and morphine had me sleeping all day so they took me off both and gave me percoset or vicodin. I was in a cast (first plaster then fiberglass both non-weight bearing) for about 8 weeks. Then after, a boot (non weight bearing), for some time and then back to a cast for 3 weeks and then nothing. I was non weight bearing for about 3 months and really for 2 weeks post op, stuck in bed. It was bad. All the first 4 months were crutches.

Nerve transfer surgery was not an option for me and I forgot why but definitely go to HSS since u are in NYC.

Feel free to ask more.
[QUOTE=Clonexx;3468389]I agree, unless someone has had drop foot, they really can't quite imagine what it's like. There are things out there to help it, like an AFO. An AFO is basically a leaf spring that attaches to your calf and slips into your shoe/sneaker and goes underneath your foot. It has some flex to it, and basically keeps your foot "up" instead of dragging on the ground. You can walk normally with it and it has some tension so that it will "spring" your foot back up after taking a step. There isn't any actual springs involved, it's just a piece of plastic molded a certain way. I have used one at my PT sessions and let me tell you, even though the one I used wasn't molded to me specifically (any one you get will be molded to your specific build), it helps a TON.

I really hope both of you get better or find some way around it. I know exactly how you both feel and wish you all the best.[/QUOTE]
I had a non fitted plastic AFO first and then I had a fitted plastic AFO. I thought it worked well until I had a titanium AFO. The thing is lighter than the plastic and no one knows I have a problem with my foot. It is so much easier even after the surgery using my AFO then no using it. I really have come to rely on it especially when I am in a rish to go somewhere and I might walk fast. There is no way I could walk fast without the AFO. The titaanium AFO though cost over 1K.

I forgot to mention about the pain I had post op and still now. I never really had any pain after the surgery when I left the hospital nor did I use any pain meds when I left. I think the first day I took one percoset, threw up and said screw this and was fine. I was more scared to see how if I would have pain without meds and when I realized I had none, I was ok. Now, even 14 months post op, I still have tingling in my foot and leg. It isn't pain but there is a huge difference in how both legs feel. Also, I now am getting a lot of 'sparking' in my foot. My PT thinks it is possibily the nerve really starting to work and heal itself but it could be simply the residual damage to the nerve and just is what it is. I am just going to have to live with it. My surgeon thinkns eventually all of that will go away and both legs will feel the same. I don't agree.
[QUOTE=Lynn1991NY;3473640]I had a non fitted plastic AFO first and then I had a fitted plastic AFO. I thought it worked well until I had a titanium AFO. The thing is lighter than the plastic and no one knows I have a problem with my foot. It is so much easier even after the surgery using my AFO then no using it. I really have come to rely on it especially when I am in a rish to go somewhere and I might walk fast. There is no way I could walk fast without the AFO. The titaanium AFO though cost over 1K.

I forgot to mention about the pain I had post op and still now. I never really had any pain after the surgery when I left the hospital nor did I use any pain meds when I left. I think the first day I took one percoset, threw up and said screw this and was fine. I was more scared to see how if I would have pain without meds and when I realized I had none, I was ok. Now, even 14 months post op, I still have tingling in my foot and leg. It isn't pain but there is a huge difference in how both legs feel. Also, I now am getting a lot of 'sparking' in my foot. My PT thinks it is possibily the nerve really starting to work and heal itself but it could be simply the residual damage to the nerve and just is what it is. I am just going to have to live with it. My surgeon thinkns eventually all of that will go away and both legs will feel the same. I don't agree.[/QUOTE]


Lynn, thank you so much for all of the very valuable information. You have really explained so much to me. I too have tingling and a weird kind of numbness in my foot and leg...my good leg feels normal, and the other one feels so odd and different. I don't really have pain either, but the sensations I do feel are very annoying and irritating on a 24 hour a day basis...I hope this improves with time since I am only 4 months out with this whole thing. Normal pain killers like Tylenol don't do a thing for this discomfort, and I really don't want to start taking stronger drugs.

Also, I would really like to know more about your titanium AFO, since I find my custom molded plastic one so uncomfortable. Thank you so much for mentioning it. I have a very wide foot to begin with...XXW...so finding a shoe to accommodate my foot and the AFO is very difficult...right now I'm trying on men's shoes! Since we are both in the NY area, it would be very helpful for me to know where you went for your titanium brace...I really had never heard of it before, and although more than 1K is expensive, it would be worth it for me. Once again, thanks so much for all of the information, and I hope that your "sparking" foot is a sign of real healing.
[QUOTE=Lynn1991NY;3473637]Tanya: I was in the hospital 2 days after my tendon transfer. The surgery was 4 hours but I was 'out' so I don't remember any of it. I was on morphine for a bit but I was itching like crazy so at first they gave me benadryl but the combo of benadryl and morphine had me sleeping all day so they took me off both and gave me percoset or vicodin. I was in a cast (first plaster then fiberglass both non-weight bearing) for about 8 weeks. Then after, a boot (non weight bearing), for some time and then back to a cast for 3 weeks and then nothing. I was non weight bearing for about 3 months and really for 2 weeks post op, stuck in bed. It was bad. All the first 4 months were crutches.

Nerve transfer surgery was not an option for me and I forgot why but definitely go to HSS since u are in NYC.

Feel free to ask more.[/QUOTE]


Lynn, thanks for the information about HHS...this is definitely where I will go if I am a candidate for tendon transfer surgery. Also, thanks for the realistic description of what is involved in this kind of surgery as well. It sure doesn't sound like you walk in, get it fixed, and then walk out again. If it works, then all of it is worth it in the end. You're now 14 months post op and have had some setbacks along the way, but you seem to be doing great now. Do you notice a real improvement in your ability to walk and get around since the tendon transfer surgery...just wondering how it is 14 months down the line...thanks again!
TANYA:

Well, unfortunately 14 months out, I still have those sensations you are describing. My surgeon claims he is sure they will go away but I am sure they won't. It's not because I am not a positive person but because I know my body and those feelings in my foot and leg have not even diminished a little bit since all of this started let alone since either surgery took place. I always ask my surgeon if both legs and feet will feel the same, that is, that I won't 'feel' the left leg constanly, and he tells me yes but I am sure it will never be the same.

As for the titantium AFO, I normally wear 8 sneakers. With the AFO, I bought a pair of 9Ws for my left foot with the AFO and and a pair of 8 1/2 regular so the right foot can wear the 8 1/2. The reasoning was that when the brace came off, at least I can wear 8 1/2s and not then have to buy 8s. I could have bought 8s but I thought there would be residual swelling for years so I didn't want to chance it. Now, if I do wear a sneaker on my left foot, without the brace, it is the 8 1/2 because it could never get into an 8 so I was right.

I got the titanium AFO thtough my surgeon at HSS. He has a person that he works with and she has an office there and an office on LI. I cannot give the name on this board as they don't allow it but if you contact HSS and speak with the team that does tendon transfers then they can direct you to her.

Half of the cost of the titanium AFO brace was covered by my insurance so even if the carrier says no at first, I would ask and push and even appeal to your carrier. Have your doctor/surgeon/neuro write a letter. You would be surprised what the carrier coveres after you push them a bit. The brace is worth it. Trust me.

Oh, tylenol etc will not help the sensations you asre feeling since it really isn't pain. You just have to deal with it unfortunately. Post again if you have other questions.
Some days I think I do notice a huge improvement and days like today where I had a job interview in the morning and walked without my brace, I don't think there is much.

I walked 4 blocks to the train, was on a train sitting for 45 min and then walked 3 very long blocks after getting off the train without my AFO. After about an hour at the interview, I then walked back to the train those 3 long blocks,took the train to Manhattan and then walked the 4 blocks home. When I got home, I was exhausted, my leg and foot hurt and I had to take a huge nap. I am still tired now. It had to be because of the walking involved. This happened last week too. I tried one day to walk for about 2 hours, albeit slowly and with some breaks, without the brace and literally was exhausted for 4 days!

I sometimes wonder if I should have had the foot fused instead of the tendon transfer but I cannot tell yet because my last surgery was only about 2 1/2 months ago.
Lynn

Thank you for sharing so much information about the tendon transfer, the AFO and the insurance, and everything else. This is such a peculiar condition that people who haven’t experienced it don’t even know what I’m talking about. Although I doubt that the tingling and weirdness I feel in my right leg will ever go away, the awful nerve pain I experienced in the beginning from my calf to my foot has gotten a lot better….it was really brutal and I’ve stopped taking the heavy meds that I was given for that. I started taking vitamins, and in my case it actually seemed to help with the pain. Who knows?

From the activity that you describe when you went on your interview, etc., it sounds as if you are making wonderful progress…. but healing from anything orthopedic is sort of a two steps forward, one step backward kind of deal from what I can see. Since I’m still mending a broken bone and recovering from surgery, it will be quite a while before I’m walking around somewhat normally again, with or without a dropped foot. [U] One other question I have is if you had to wear some kind of boot or brace at night before your tendon transfer surgery. I do, and I find it very restrictive for having a comfortable night’s sleep, but I don’t have a choice. If I don’t wear it, my foot will start to point downward and then that is more surgery.[/U]

As for the AFO two-step with shoes, I’ve come to sort of a compromise…I actually wear two different shoes--a regular leather shoe for my left foot, and a similar looking shoe with an elastic top on my right foot. I used to have trouble finding shoes wide enough without wearing any AFO, so now it’s a real picnic. My solution is odd, but it’s comfortable, I can walk much better with my walker, so that’s that for now until I discover something else. I don’t know if you noticed any progress with foot movement prior to your tendon transfer surgery, but I have noticed very very tiny progress. In the beginning, I could only move my foot inward and downward…nothing else. Now I notice that I can move my big toe and second toe upwards a little bit, and I can also move the foot outward a little bit. I mean we’re talking very little movement here, and I don’t know if it means a thing. As for moving my ankle up and down, I couldn’t do it in the beginning and I can’t do it now.

Take care, and my best wishes for your continued progress and full recovery. Once again, thanks so much for all of your help!
I know the burning I had right after I herniated my back (that caused the foot drop) went away in about 10 days. I never had to really worry about acute pain after that. I just had numbness, tingling and that 'not right'/ 'akward' feeling that is so hard to describe in my leg since. That has not gotten any better. I have numbness and tingling constantly. People don't get how annoying that is and I am used to it but I sure would like NOT to have it anymore.

I started taking vitamins a while back and after I got the flu or some sort about one month ago I stopped because I couldn't hold anything down. I have to restart the vitamins but I don't think it helped. It sure cannot hurt though.

I didn't feel so wonderful walking to and from that interview. I left the interview and just wanted to make it home in one piece and sleep. I was that exhausted. Personally, I think I will be wearing sneakers until I find shoes I can wear. It shouldn't be that hard to find but I will have to buy two pair so I can buy 9W and 8 1/2 regulars so the brace will fit.

I did not wear a boot/brace before my surgery at night. I don't understand why you would have to. I now wear it at night and will continue to do so for a long time. I think your doctor is worried about creep. That is when the muscles stretch out and cause the foot to drop. What I wonder about is why would the doctor care BEFORE the surgery when the surgery is going move the tendons to the top of your foot? Post surgery, then your doctor has to worry about creep, that is, the tendons stretching because the foot is not at a 90 degree angle. If they stretch too much, the tendons are no longer tight enough to hold up the foot for the swing phase of walking. I would ask your doctor about that. I only can understand wearing a brace on your foot at night after the surgery. I got my brace at footsmart online and my surgeon said it was fine. I hate wearing it but I certainly don't want these tendon's to stretch and get loose.

I hope that answers your question and feel free to ask any others.
Thanks for all the info, once again…I really had no idea that I would have to wear a brace at night after the tendon transfer surgery. No one has mentioned this little fact yet, but it makes perfect sense as you describe it. What I don’t know yet would fill volumes.

The reason that I’ve been told to wear a brace at night is to keep the Achilles tendon in the back of my leg from becoming shorter, since my foot is hanging or flopping down in the front. By continuously having it in this pointing position the Achilles tendon would have to be lengthened at the time of the tendon transfer surgery, and the doctors are trying to avoid that. I guess every case of foot drop is different, since it can come from many different causes. Your foot drop originated from your back, and mine is coming from the leg.

As for shoes, I’ve been very lucky with the Orthofeet brand, since they seem to have a lot of give for the AFO, and at the same time are supportive enough for the normal foot. My feet are so wide, and I have to wear two different shoes, but perhaps you could get away with a single pair.

Really Lynn, I can’t thank you enough for all the information you’ve been kind enough to share. You’ve answered questions that I didn’t even know I had! I know that walking to that interview was difficult and exhausting, but from where I am right now it seems like a wonderful accomplishment. I become exhausted as well from lugging my right foot around and refer to it as my boat anchor.

Take care, and feel better every day. I will post again if any more questions come to mind, and please let me know how you are doing.
Surgery is done, it went well. He had to repair my Meniscus as well. I didn't get out of the hospital until Friday though due to 2 Femoral nerve blocks they did. It kept the pain at bay post op, but it also kept me from being able to move/lift my leg, so I couldn't walk. I can't sit at the computer long, so that's about all I can say right now, since I am in a massive amount of pain post op.

They sent me home with an off the shelf AFO that doesn't fit worth a damn. I will have to get a molded one done once the swelling goes down, though if I have to go long term, the Titanium one sounds great.

I hope this finds you all doing well.

Sean
Oh My
I am so sorry to read about your little girl. I know that you are probably going nuts trying to find info and get help. I haven't done much posting, mostly just reading others but your story really got me, I have permanent nerve damage and paralasis from a botched hip replacement and that was nearly 5 yrs ago. However I did get a little movement back after 4yrs and I am 67 yrs old, Your daughter is young and if you can just keep up looking for answers and dont dont give up! Also watch out for your own health, By that I mean depression, Sometimes we don't when we are depressed but when I finally went on an antidepression pill it really did help.Is you baby in pain?
Just know that are alot of people on here that will read you story and give you support.:angel: I will be thinking of both of you
[QUOTE=Clonexx;3481391]Surgery is done, it went well. He had to repair my Meniscus as well. I didn't get out of the hospital until Friday though due to 2 Femoral nerve blocks they did. It kept the pain at bay post op, but it also kept me from being able to move/lift my leg, so I couldn't walk. I can't sit at the computer long, so that's about all I can say right now, since I am in a massive amount of pain post op.

They sent me home with an off the shelf AFO that doesn't fit worth a damn. I will have to get a molded one done once the swelling goes down, though if I have to go long term, the Titanium one sounds great.

I hope this finds you all doing well.

Sean[/QUOTE]


Hi there Sean:wave::wave:

Glad to hear you have your surgery behind you now...that must be a huge relief. I do hope that your post op pain eases up and that you are now on the road to a speedy and full recovery. I still have to face all of this somewhere down the road and am not looking forward to it. I have had surgery before and am not really looking forward to this one. As for the AFO, I really hate my molded one, but I do wear it since it helps me to walk...trouble is finding shoes to wear with the darned thing.

Feel better...Best, T
As I said in my earlier post I cut my peroneal nerve on December 1, 2006 causing my drop foot. On January 29, 2008 I had a tendon transfer, the bridle procedure. I was in a non wieght bearing cast for 6 weeks.
On March 10th I got my cast off and got the infamous walking boot. I couldn't believe how weak my foot got after working for the last 14 months to build up my strength to have the operation. I went to therapy on friday to start to retrain my brain to work muscles I haven't used in 14 months. I was very skeptical but after about 45 minutes of stretching and muscle massage my foot started to move upwards. It's obviously still very shakey but it does work. I am writing this to let some of you know that if a non believer like me can do it you can too, so don't ever give up. I still have a long way to go but I have a wife and two kids to keep up with so I can't stop trying.
All,

Having read through the entire post I wanted to add on my experience so far and to say thank you to all those whom have shared their experiences.

On January 25th 08 I fractured both bones in my lower leg, the T at the very bottom and the F at the very top. Surgery three days later and they placed 8" of steel and what seems to be enough screws to hang a good sized room of wall board...

Well as you can guess I have suffered some amount of trauma to my peroneal nerve and have the condition referred to as drop foot presently. My experience so far has been slightly different from some of the others and I think it might also provide some value for folks encountering this condition. I plan on occasionally posting on this site as this progresses and hopefully I can recover in the hopes that it can provide some help for someone encountering this.

I might be different from the folks on this post as I have feeling all over my foot I am just lacking the neuro-muscular control presently. The orthopedic surgeon believes at this point based upon the nature of the fracture and the sensation remaining the nerve appears to have suffered a stretch injury rather that something more severe at this point.

I have just started physical therapy and interesting enough there appears to be a relatively simple seeming test that a Physical Therapist can conduct to find out if your nerve is sending the messages to the muscles to raise your foot (not sure how this might help some whom have been entombed in a plaster cast with the atrophy and all but for what it is worth), by feeling where the muscles are supposed to fire at just above the ankle in the front of the leg while I attempted to raise my foot there was a noticeable muscular reaction which from what I have been told is a very positive sign.

While I am not a stranger to rehabilitation (having played soccer competitively for many years I have been through in no particular order ALC&LCL reconstruction, broken toes (all of them at least once), one ankle, a collar bone, and finally a torn labrum) the totally devastating feeling of not having a part of my body respond the way I am accustomed to is one I will not ever be comfortable with.

While I am greatly saddened so many others have had to endure this condition I am at the same time comforted by reading that I am not alone in having this condition.

I wish all that have posted or have had to deal with this condition a swift recovery and a positive outcome.

Peace,
G
Hi clshrfan...

Just writing a little update on my experience as well as it seems quite close to yours...right now I am 4 months out with foot drop due to a leg fracture and like you, I have always had sensation in my foot, along with a feeling of numbness and tingling as well from the knee on down. The numbness and tingling, however, have not interfered with the feeling, which I think is strange. Since this whole thing started, I have noticed very humble progress, but it is progress nonetheless. In the beginning I could only move my foot a little flicker to the outside. Now I can move it more to the outside (evert I think it's called), and when I try really hard, I can move my foot up at the ankle about 1/2". I also have a little more movement in the toes as well. When I look at my ankle, like you, I can see some muscle twitching too. I hope this is a sign of better things to come and have been told by my PT to practice moving my foot upward for 30 minutes a day while dangling my legs off the side of the bed.

Have you gone for an EMG and nerve test yet in order to determine the exact nature of your problem? These tests are not pleasant, but they are not that bad either. Take care and thank you for words of encouragment. Best, T
[QUOTE=DanhanO6;3490461]As I said in my earlier post I cut my peroneal nerve on December 1, 2006 causing my drop foot. On January 29, 2008 I had a tendon transfer, the bridle procedure. I was in a non wieght bearing cast for 6 weeks.
On March 10th I got my cast off and got the infamous walking boot. I couldn't believe how weak my foot got after working for the last 14 months to build up my strength to have the operation. I went to therapy on friday to start to retrain my brain to work muscles I haven't used in 14 months. I was very skeptical but after about 45 minutes of stretching and muscle massage my foot started to move upwards. It's obviously still very shakey but it does work. I am writing this to let some of you know that if a non believer like me can do it you can too, so don't ever give up. I still have a long way to go but I have a wife and two kids to keep up with so I can't stop trying.[/QUOTE]


Thanks for the follow up about your tendon transfer. I may be facing this surgery sometime down the line and am grateful for the information you have provided, since I'm basically a non believer too. I know what you mean about rehabilitating muscles, because I am now rehabilitating my very weakened quadriceps muscle due to a fracture and surgery. The PT wanted me to climb up a stair with the weakened leg without holding on and I told him that there was no way that I could do it. Then I started to really concentrate on using that muscle and I was able to go up the stair. I couldn't believe it. I have a long way to go too, but I've got to hang in there! Take care...Best, T
[QUOTE=AbqHags;2943324]Lynn1991- Your information is very important to me. One doctor recommended ankle fusion, forget it i said, tendon transfer is my next step. I'm curious to track your progress, i understand physical therapy could be up to 3months. Are you in a walking cast by now???[/QUOTE]

Sorry I cannot write a longer response right now but I had my surgery initially in January 2007 and had a revision in November 2007. For the first surgery, the more serious one, I was out of commission about 2-3 months either with a cast, fiber glass cast, walking boot and/ or crutches. I started PT some time in April and have been there since. My November surgery required a cast (non weight bearing for 2 weeks) and it took weeks to get back to where I was pre-surgery. By the waty, before my January 2007 surgery I had been in PT for iover 6 months strengthing my ankle and foot muscles.

At this point, if I had to do it again, I might have considered the fusion. I am not sure though. I was 100% against it before the surgery.

Feel free to ask any other questions.
Tanya:
I do buy 2 different pairs of shoes still. I hate that. I also am glad to hear that it exhausts someone else to lug around a foot. I feel it exhausting to walk without my brace and now don't do it much. I know the point of the surgery was to get out of the brace but the exhausttion I feel after walking and not having the brace on is not worth it to me.
Sean
How are you doing? What will you be doing in terms of braces and casts for the next few weeks?
Dear Tanya8,

Thanks for the information that is great to hear that even if not as quick or as much as any would like there is some progress, and that is great news I am very happy for you and certainly hope it picks up speed from here.
I had my first active PT session yesterday where I started on exercises and was beyond ecstatic to have some positive results, while I still have no noticeable dorsi-flexion I do have strong rotation with some elevation of the two smallest toes, so some very positive encouragement there. The PT is quite confident that I will gain more and more as we progress and if it is taking too long for rapid responsiveness I will have the nerve tests done, but as my orthopedic surgeon stated I am not at risk of a compression, there is defiantly no cut, that leaves a stretch injury and those fortunately are the most likely to fully recover. That said I will keep al my options open and hopeful gain some of the same success you have had and share it here for others with the hopes that it might provide some encouragement and if I am lucky some hope for those with this condition.

Best wishes going forwards.
hey all

was wondering why this thread had gone all quiet then just found out they had stopped notifying me by email for whatever reason.... :confused:

Anyway, good to hear all your updates. Going in for surgery on Monday. Dont have a lot of information, dont even know how long it takes! But will update here as soon as I can.

G
An update of sorts.


Well I have been active in physical therapy and have found continued reason for hope. I am now able to positively extend and raise my toes, save my big toe, a bit which means that I have apparently surpassed the first big hurdle of not having lost my minor muscle groups, which I believe is a big reason for the need for speed in having a nerve scan done and further convinces me that the doctor was correct in his thinking that the injury to the nerve was a stretch and that it is likely I will recover. That said it is not coming back as quickly as the Physical Therapist thinks it should so after meeting with the doctor later this week I will have some more informed information to add. In the mean time I continue to do my exercises and hope all the other folks experiencing this have some positive results in their recovery and fully come back form it.

Peace
Best wishes on your surgery and a speedy and full recovery. I really hope this brings you complete as possible full health as well as relief and greater mobility.
Hi all

Just home from the hospital. Went in yesterday morning, procedure took around 3 hours. As well as transferring the tendon they extended the achilles. In a cast up to my knee and need crutches to get around. The pain comes and goes, more discomfort than anything. Going back next week to get the cast redone and the stitches out then see the consultant again the following week. Will post more info as soon as I have it.
Very sorry to hear about your accident and subsequent condition. I just come back today from San francisco where I had a tarsal tuunel surgery preformed by a Dr. Peled at a Dellon Institute. People are coming from all over the country to see him for special nerve issues. Waiting for surgery I met a man whos wife was finishing up with her surgery, he was a doctor (gp) himself and was from Los Angeles, his wife had drop foot for many years. Today, the day after both are surgeries I ran into the couple at the surgeons office for a follow-up, they both were elated as she could already raise her foot and did not need any pain meds, the doctor was very impressed with Dr. Peled as was I and how my surgery went. I could not talk to them long as they had to catch a plane, I know the Dr. made a small incision in the area of the back of the knee or side. The speialize in neuropathy but are tops on many nerve problems. They have several institutes acroos the USA, which have Drs. trained by Dr. Dellon who started the whole thing. Check it out and let me know what you think or if you need anymore info.
Hi Clshfan...I hope you are doing well and gaining function with every passing day. As I mentioned before, I have noticed some improvement, but now seem to be stuck at this level...I can move my foot up a about an inch and some to the side, but that's it. I hope I make a further recovery, but only time will tell. In the meantime I've been using a horrid plastic AFO, which was never comfortable from day one. Even tough it was custom-made, I just couldn't get used to it. Since it was time for a new one, I've now been fitted with one made out of carbon. I'm just passing the word along, since I find it much more comfortable and natural when I walk.
Take care and continued health and blessings...Tanya
Hi everyone.

Sorry for my absense for those who were waiting for a response to my surgery. It is 9 weeks since I had my ankle tendon transfer to rectify the foot drop i suffered from a ACL/LCL and pernoeal nerve injury from playing soccer 5 years ago.

Initially i was due to be in a cast for 6 weeks and then in a protective walking boot for a further 6 weeks. However, after the first 6 weeks my surgeon decided to put me in another cast for 6 more weeks! I am able to walk on it un-aided by crutches for short distances. His decision to do this was based on caution and to give it the best chance of success. I had my cast changed after 2 weeks and 6 weeks, when he took the cast off the foot stayed in the 90 degree position which was a great relief (if a little bizarre after so long with foot drop). I hope it will be the same in three weeks when I will be cast free. strangely, I have regained some movement of my toes (not the big one) which previously never moved. It isnt powerful enough to move my foot but it is strange to see the little fellas wiggling about after all this time. My surgeon doesnt really know what has caused this and certainly wasn't an aim of the surgery.

Apart from that I dont have much to report as I am now just waiting to see if I will be able to walk without the aid of an AFO, once the cast is off. However, by reading a few reports on here it looks like I shouldn't get my hopes up too much. Fingers crossed though.

Gary - did you progress any further with my surgeon or decide to stay in Scotland for the surgery? Hope all is going well for you.

All the best everyone,

Stay positive,

Andrew.
Hi Kippa and everyone else.

I am now 1 year and about 4 months post posterior tibial tendon transfer after having a complete left foot drop. I am still in the AFO. However many of my surgeons patients (if not all) are out of the brace and walking well. I also cannot move my big toe but my others move somewhat. I had a complete and I mean 100% total foot drop so I didnt have high hopes going into any of this. The surgeon did but I didn't.

I had a EMG 2 weeks ago and although the doctor did see a tiny bit of regeneration, the Head of the EMG Dept said it was very insignificant. My surgeon disagreed and said for having no regeneration and activity for years and finally to see some, was excellent.

Nevertheless, I can move my foot about 2-3 inches in the AM but as the day progresses, it gets fatigued and I cannot move it. As of three weeks ago I went to PT 2 times a week, 3 hrs each time but I lost my insurance so I am at a loss of what to do now. I also lost my job last year due to all the issues with my foot. It's all quite frustrating.
Hi Gmac just re-read my previous email and it seems I have re-named you Gary! Sorry Graeme!

Shy - I was also re-reading the rest of the thread and came across your kind words, Thankyou.





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