It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Neuropathy Message Board


Neuropathy Board Index
Board Index > Neuropathy | 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


[QUOTE=gmac1975;3845304]Hey Tanya, thanks for the nice message. You've been a big help, just wish other folk here in Scotland over the past 14 years had given me as much information. :mad: Anyway.... :)

Got a bit of an update on my situation. Went to see a podiatrist just for a check-up on my foot and ended up seeing a bio-mechanic. Just as well as she thought my foot might be starting to drop a bit again. :eek:

She was surprised that I wasnt getting any physio and has referred me to go and see one as she thinks the lack of exercises (my fault...) could be affecting the leg, especially the tendon which was stretched as part of my operation. She says if it gets worse might need to go back to wearing a splint again or having another op - not sure which scenario would be worse. :(

So I guess the morale of the story is 1) dont always assume doctors are right and 2) always do your exercises!!

Hope you're keeping well, you seem to be making good progress which is great. :cool:[/QUOTE]


Hi GMAC...

Thanks for your kind words about my helping you...actually I think we're all helping each other in this foot drop situation...it's real pain to treat and to live with... After reading your message, I'm surprised that your podiatrist and [I]bio-mechanic[/I] (what is that GMAC...don't think we have those in the US) were the first ones to notice that your foot might be dropping a little. How do you feel when you're walking around? It sounds as if you were doing quite well, and I think that's the most important thing...

From my experience here, the orthopedists, neurosurgeons, and even the physiotherapists concentrate on the ultimate functioning of the foot and how you can walk, even though the therapists do take measurements from time to time. For example, even though my affected foot cannot dorsiflex as much as my normal foot, it can dorsiflex enough to clear the ground when I walk. I've stopped wearing a foot brace and am still able to walk OK :)...and I'm really surprised :D. It was pointed out to me by my various doctors that when we walk, we don't fully keep our foot at a 90 degree angle, and that's why I can go without the brace. I have about an inch to go for my semi-dropped foot to be equal to the other foot. I'm thrilled about all of this, and the reason I'm telling you about this is because perhaps this is where you are too.

In any event, doing exercise can only help your situation, and perhaps where you are now is the final outcome of your surgery and where you're supposed to be. I really think it's premature to start talking about braces and more surgery at this point...I do exercises too, but I must admit that I could better job in this department ...Please let me know how you're doing and what your doctors have to say...and take care!

Tanya
[QUOTE=Tanya8;3852232]Hi GMAC...

Thanks for your kind words about my helping you...actually I think we're all helping each other in this foot drop situation...it's real pain to treat and to live with... After reading your message, I'm surprised that your podiatrist and [I]bio-mechanic[/I] (what is that GMAC...don't think we have those in the US) were the first ones to notice that your foot might be dropping a little. How do you feel when you're walking around? It sounds as if you were doing quite well, and I think that's the most important thing...

From my experience here, the orthopedists, neurosurgeons, and even the physiotherapists concentrate on the ultimate functioning of the foot and how you can walk, even though the therapists do take measurements from time to time. For example, even though my affected foot cannot dorsiflex as much as my normal foot, it can dorsiflex enough to clear the ground when I walk. I've stopped wearing a foot brace and am still able to walk OK :)...and I'm really surprised :D. It was pointed out to me by my various doctors that when we walk, we don't fully keep our foot at a 90 degree angle, and that's why I can go without the brace. I have about an inch to go for my semi-dropped foot to be equal to the other foot. I'm thrilled about all of this, and the reason I'm telling you about this is because perhaps this is where you are too.

In any event, doing exercise can only help your situation, and perhaps where you are now is the final outcome of your surgery and where you're supposed to be. I really think it's premature to start talking about braces and more surgery at this point...I do exercises too, but I must admit that I could better job in this department ...Please let me know how you're doing and what your doctors have to say...and take care!

Tanya[/QUOTE]

Hi Tanya

Thanks for replying. I again have to question the role of my surgeon in all this. He undoubtedly did a great job but I still question why he delayed me getting physio and why he elected to stop it after just 6 weeks. I remember he made some sort of patronising comment like 'Will we let you get on with your life?' which meant to me that everything was fine and I could proceed as normal. The physio, I think also surprised that my treatment was stopping, gave me a set of exercises to continue at home. Given the consultant's comments, I thought the exercises were to see if I could get even more dorsiflexion or improve the overall picture. At no point did anyone say that if I didnt do them the situation would worsen.

I put my hands up and say I got lazy and didnt do the exercises as often as I should have. My son was born in August and so life got a bit mental. Finding 5 mins to do anything was a struggle! I started to notice my foot getting a bit stiff and a couple of times I stubbed my toe which I hadnt done for ages. So I knew something wasn quite right.

My appointment with the podiatrist (that I arranged off my own back) was primarily to take care of the hard skin that had traditionally formed on the sole of my foot because of the AFO. By a very fortunate coincidence I saw this biomechanic (something that was, like you, completely new to me) who looked at the overall picture and cross-referred me to see a physio. As it's on the NHS and not private it will take up to 6 weeks for an appointment. The surgeon and the physio from the private hospital felt I didnt need to see them for a follow-up say 6 months down the line which, in hindsight, is pretty shocking.

I've gone back to doing my exercises every day which seems to help and hopefully seeing the physio, whenever I get an appointment, can only help too.

Sorry for the moan. The good news is you seem to be making excellent progress and long may that continue. :)

Graeme
Thanks for the prompt message Bobby Flay.
My doctors initially gave me a splint/brace that goes inside the shoe and up the back of the leg with a strap going around the calf. It is uncomfortable, but with a soft insert and a thick sock it is just bearable. It keeps my foot at a right angle and enables me to walk quicker without that fear of tripping over my own toes. I saw an orthopaedic surgeon today and I mentioned what I had read on this site regarding braces on overnight etc. He agreed with you and others and said as often as possible wear them because the achilles tendon can shorten overtime if the foot is in drop position alot. Either way I wouldn't have known that if it wasn't for this site. Thank you and others.
I have a tall pair of lace up boots that help as well. I will just make sure it gets some air. When you mentioned "amputation" I nearly fell of my chair. I will definitely not let that happen.
I do feel lucky. I am able to walk. I flew through mid air for about 20 meters and landed like a rag doll. Believe it or not I'm happy with the injuries I have. I remember being in mid air thinking this is going to hurt. I could have ended up paralised or dead.
I have two motorbikes both of which are now being sold. It's a crying shame because it was a big passion of mine. It has taken this accident to make me realise how fragile the body is.
Thank you very much. Keep you informed. Gary
Hello All,
I haven't posted in this forum for some time, but I have read through a few of the messages and I am always grateful for everyone's input and information. Any information is always a helpful thing on "drop foot island."

I am curious about people's AFO stories. Graham, I was having similar trouble with foot calluses / rawness on my non-affected foot due to no brace becasue of odd weight bearing behavior. I'm managing it now, but I was shocked how quickly it came on, and within 2 days it became unbearable even in bed.

I am currently using my 3rd and 4th brace versions and am using them in conjunction with one another. The first was a giant, thick fiberglass version, fitted by a specialist in an ortho office. It was not unlike a cast for a broken ankle / foot with the front of it open and several small and large velcro closures. It made stairs and sitting impossible and thus was used twice and never again, not to mention I would have to buy sneakers 2 sizes larger than my foot size. Next I fell for the advertising of a "soft" version that could be worn with or without shoes that was useless and expensive - think of an elastic version of gladiator shoes. The latest versions that I ordered are also soft. One laces through your sneaker (or dress shoe for men I suppose) and has two velcro straps that you attach to a very soft velcro cuff that goes around your mid calf. The brace basically keeps your foot from dropping too much through the tension of the straps. It wasn't quite enough for me, so I use it with brace number 4, also a velcro cuff with a fastener in the front. A wide plastic tongue is laced into the front portion of the sneaker with a tail that has the opposing side of the faster attached via tough elastic material. Together the two fastener pieces (From front of leg brace and top of sneaker) snap together and lock (with a good deal of effort). You'd be right to think none of this is fun or greatly comfortable, but for the first time in 9 months I was able to walk for excercise. I did it on the treadmill so I could still hold on to the handrails for now, but honestly it felt great! I don't wear the brace all day, but put it on to excercise or go shopping or longer walking errands. I really was shocked to realize just how slowly I've been walking and started to become accustomed to the pace. I'm 36 and felt 80. However, I knew I had to look for alternatives when the knee on my unaffected leg started really hurting due to the sideways pressure I was putting on it by my steepage gate.
I haven't yet tried any of the long / structured braces after the first horrible one, but would like to hear about anyone's expereince.

Elandre, it is very easy to get depressed, I really understand what you mean. However the worst part to me is no information, no good advice, and really no treatment by doctors (I've seen 7). So I'm really happy to have found this forum and to hear anyone else's stories of what is working for you or not.

Also, Graham I'm really glad to hear about the swimming advice. I wanted to ask about it, because my leg weakness is pretty overwhelming, and I didn't know what that would mean under water - although I did have quite a good chuckle at the thought of swimming in circles because one "rudder" wasn't working! :) Thanks for the advice.

Cheers, Mary





All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:24 AM.





© 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!