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Hi Tanya, how's things?

how you progressing? Any big updates? I havent been on here for a while for the simple reason that I havent got much more news to report. I stopped seeing the consultant and the physios about 2 months ago with the onus on me to keep doing the stretching/balancing/strengthening exercises at home. In truth I've been a bit lax with it all so my ankle gets a bit stiff from time to time, my own fault. The foot drop has been eradicated but movement is still pretty limited. Have started back swimming again and am going to return to badminton again soon to see if we can get it all a bit more loose and useful! Would be good to hear from you soon.

To anyone else looking in, I had a tendon transfer on my foot about 6 months ago after severing my sciatic nerve 14 years ago. Happy to answer any questions :)
Hey Gmac, it's so good to hear from you again...sounds like you're really doing great and I'm so happy for you...


Right now I feel as if the decompression surgery has been an incredible success, and I'm so happy. My ankle is able to move inwards, outwards, and downwards fully, and it can move a little more than halfway upwards...and it also feels a lot stronger as well...not bad considering where I was last November. AND...I'm driving now!!!! I have to lift my leg a little when going between the pedals, but I think I also did this before the foot drop??? I can't remember... Anyway, I can drive without the help of my left foot, so I feel as if I've just been released from prison...actually, I would have driven any way I could have...left footed, right footed, both feet, but driving with only my right foot was a lofty goal I had set for myself. I can also walk around without any brace at all for a day, but I have to "think" about my foot too much at this point...hopefully by this time next year, I will be even further along and not using any brace at all...

So that's where I am right now...I've not been so athletic as you have, but hopefully that will come back with time...swimming would be great exercise, but an indoor pool is quite far away, and it's getting cold here now...looks like nice long walks in the woods (or shopping malls) will have to do for now...I know how difficult it is to "come back" from injuries like this, but I was really so fortunate to find my doctor before things became permanent...hope to hear again from you soon, and I'm glad you were able to find my bread crumb trail over here to this new message board...

Best of health to the two of us...

Tanya
[B]Hey GMAC[/B]...it's been a while since I've been here, and I'm glad to hear you're doing so well...I'm coming along, as they say, and don't have too much more to report except that I'm only wearing my elastic ankle support about half the time now...I must be getting better, since I'm not tripping all over the place... I still have a squeezing feeling around the ankle, and I don't think that will ever go away. But I don't care, as long as the foot continues to work...

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to you GMAC...you've been a real pal over the last year and have helped me so much! :D
[QUOTE=Tanya8;3830244][B]Hey GMAC[/B]...it's been a while since I've been here, and I'm glad to hear you're doing so well...I'm coming along, as they say, and don't have too much more to report except that I'm only wearing my elastic ankle support about half the time now...I must be getting better, since I'm not tripping all over the place... I still have a squeezing feeling around the ankle, and I don't think that will ever go away. But I don't care, as long as the foot continues to work...

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to you GMAC...you've been a real pal over the last year and have helped me so much! :D[/QUOTE]

Hey Tanya, thanks for the nice message. You've been a big help, just wish other folk here in Scotland over the past 14 years had given me as much information. :mad: Anyway.... :)

Got a bit of an update on my situation. Went to see a podiatrist just for a check-up on my foot and ended up seeing a bio-mechanic. Just as well as she thought my foot might be starting to drop a bit again. :eek:

She was surprised that I wasnt getting any physio and has referred me to go and see one as she thinks the lack of exercises (my fault...) could be affecting the leg, especially the tendon which was stretched as part of my operation. She says if it gets worse might need to go back to wearing a splint again or having another op - not sure which scenario would be worse. :(

So I guess the morale of the story is 1) dont always assume doctors are right and 2) always do your exercises!!

Hope you're keeping well, you seem to be making good progress which is great. :cool:
[QUOTE=gmac1975;3845304]Hey Tanya, thanks for the nice message. You've been a big help, just wish other folk here in Scotland over the past 14 years had given me as much information. :mad: Anyway.... :)

Got a bit of an update on my situation. Went to see a podiatrist just for a check-up on my foot and ended up seeing a bio-mechanic. Just as well as she thought my foot might be starting to drop a bit again. :eek:

She was surprised that I wasnt getting any physio and has referred me to go and see one as she thinks the lack of exercises (my fault...) could be affecting the leg, especially the tendon which was stretched as part of my operation. She says if it gets worse might need to go back to wearing a splint again or having another op - not sure which scenario would be worse. :(

So I guess the morale of the story is 1) dont always assume doctors are right and 2) always do your exercises!!

Hope you're keeping well, you seem to be making good progress which is great. :cool:[/QUOTE]


Hi GMAC...

Thanks for your kind words about my helping you...actually I think we're all helping each other in this foot drop situation...it's real pain to treat and to live with... After reading your message, I'm surprised that your podiatrist and [I]bio-mechanic[/I] (what is that GMAC...don't think we have those in the US) were the first ones to notice that your foot might be dropping a little. How do you feel when you're walking around? It sounds as if you were doing quite well, and I think that's the most important thing...

From my experience here, the orthopedists, neurosurgeons, and even the physiotherapists concentrate on the ultimate functioning of the foot and how you can walk, even though the therapists do take measurements from time to time. For example, even though my affected foot cannot dorsiflex as much as my normal foot, it can dorsiflex enough to clear the ground when I walk. I've stopped wearing a foot brace and am still able to walk OK :)...and I'm really surprised :D. It was pointed out to me by my various doctors that when we walk, we don't fully keep our foot at a 90 degree angle, and that's why I can go without the brace. I have about an inch to go for my semi-dropped foot to be equal to the other foot. I'm thrilled about all of this, and the reason I'm telling you about this is because perhaps this is where you are too.

In any event, doing exercise can only help your situation, and perhaps where you are now is the final outcome of your surgery and where you're supposed to be. I really think it's premature to start talking about braces and more surgery at this point...I do exercises too, but I must admit that I could better job in this department ...Please let me know how you're doing and what your doctors have to say...and take care!

Tanya
[QUOTE=Tanya8;3852232]Hi GMAC...

Thanks for your kind words about my helping you...actually I think we're all helping each other in this foot drop situation...it's real pain to treat and to live with... After reading your message, I'm surprised that your podiatrist and [I]bio-mechanic[/I] (what is that GMAC...don't think we have those in the US) were the first ones to notice that your foot might be dropping a little. How do you feel when you're walking around? It sounds as if you were doing quite well, and I think that's the most important thing...

From my experience here, the orthopedists, neurosurgeons, and even the physiotherapists concentrate on the ultimate functioning of the foot and how you can walk, even though the therapists do take measurements from time to time. For example, even though my affected foot cannot dorsiflex as much as my normal foot, it can dorsiflex enough to clear the ground when I walk. I've stopped wearing a foot brace and am still able to walk OK :)...and I'm really surprised :D. It was pointed out to me by my various doctors that when we walk, we don't fully keep our foot at a 90 degree angle, and that's why I can go without the brace. I have about an inch to go for my semi-dropped foot to be equal to the other foot. I'm thrilled about all of this, and the reason I'm telling you about this is because perhaps this is where you are too.

In any event, doing exercise can only help your situation, and perhaps where you are now is the final outcome of your surgery and where you're supposed to be. I really think it's premature to start talking about braces and more surgery at this point...I do exercises too, but I must admit that I could better job in this department ...Please let me know how you're doing and what your doctors have to say...and take care!

Tanya[/QUOTE]

Hi Tanya

Thanks for replying. I again have to question the role of my surgeon in all this. He undoubtedly did a great job but I still question why he delayed me getting physio and why he elected to stop it after just 6 weeks. I remember he made some sort of patronising comment like 'Will we let you get on with your life?' which meant to me that everything was fine and I could proceed as normal. The physio, I think also surprised that my treatment was stopping, gave me a set of exercises to continue at home. Given the consultant's comments, I thought the exercises were to see if I could get even more dorsiflexion or improve the overall picture. At no point did anyone say that if I didnt do them the situation would worsen.

I put my hands up and say I got lazy and didnt do the exercises as often as I should have. My son was born in August and so life got a bit mental. Finding 5 mins to do anything was a struggle! I started to notice my foot getting a bit stiff and a couple of times I stubbed my toe which I hadnt done for ages. So I knew something wasn quite right.

My appointment with the podiatrist (that I arranged off my own back) was primarily to take care of the hard skin that had traditionally formed on the sole of my foot because of the AFO. By a very fortunate coincidence I saw this biomechanic (something that was, like you, completely new to me) who looked at the overall picture and cross-referred me to see a physio. As it's on the NHS and not private it will take up to 6 weeks for an appointment. The surgeon and the physio from the private hospital felt I didnt need to see them for a follow-up say 6 months down the line which, in hindsight, is pretty shocking.

I've gone back to doing my exercises every day which seems to help and hopefully seeing the physio, whenever I get an appointment, can only help too.

Sorry for the moan. The good news is you seem to be making excellent progress and long may that continue. :)

Graeme
[QUOTE=gmac1975;3852385]Hi Tanya

Thanks for replying. I again have to question the role of my surgeon in all this. He undoubtedly did a great job but I still question why he delayed me getting physio and why he elected to stop it after just 6 weeks. I remember he made some sort of patronising comment like 'Will we let you get on with your life?' which meant to me that everything was fine and I could proceed as normal. The physio, I think also surprised that my treatment was stopping, gave me a set of exercises to continue at home. Given the consultant's comments, I thought the exercises were to see if I could get even more dorsiflexion or improve the overall picture. At no point did anyone say that if I didnt do them the situation would worsen.

I put my hands up and say I got lazy and didnt do the exercises as often as I should have. My son was born in August and so life got a bit mental. Finding 5 mins to do anything was a struggle! I started to notice my foot getting a bit stiff and a couple of times I stubbed my toe which I hadnt done for ages. So I knew something wasn quite right.

My appointment with the podiatrist (that I arranged off my own back) was primarily to take care of the hard skin that had traditionally formed on the sole of my foot because of the AFO. By a very fortunate coincidence I saw this biomechanic (something that was, like you, completely new to me) who looked at the overall picture and cross-referred me to see a physio. As it's on the NHS and not private it will take up to 6 weeks for an appointment. The surgeon and the physio from the private hospital felt I didnt need to see them for a follow-up say 6 months down the line which, in hindsight, is pretty shocking.

I've gone back to doing my exercises every day which seems to help and hopefully seeing the physio, whenever I get an appointment, can only help too.

Sorry for the moan. The good news is you seem to be making excellent progress and long may that continue. :)

Graeme[/QUOTE]

Hi GMAC...

Thanks for filling me in about the rest of your situation. I didn't realize that you were noticing any changes with your walking, and that is something to be concerned about. As for your surgeon, I think that surgeons in general must all go to the same "charm" school no matter what country they reside in. I've found them to be not the easiest people to communicate with and quite inscrutable, although they do a great job and are quite brilliant. Even though you don't see your surgeon for quite a while, is there any way you could talk to him on the telephone or email him and ask questions about your foot or why he stopped physio after only 6 weeks. Actually, he would be the person I would most want to talk to if I were you. Over here if there are any questions or changes after a surgery, it's back to the surgeon right away before any other doctors will even look at you...in any event, I hope this is just a little bump on your road to recovery. The good news is that the exercises are helping you.

As for my own situation, yes, I am very happy that I've come this far...but I do have sensory issues that I don't think will go away...it's kind of strange to always feel as if Arnold Schwarzenegger is grabbing your ankle, but it is what it is, and I'm thrilled to have come this far. I'm also very lax where my exercises are concerned, but I think everybody gets into this rut as long as they don't have scheduled PT appointments with someone looking over their back watching them do exercises... BTW, congratulations on the birth of your son...how wonderful! Keep your chin up :D, and let me know how you're doing...

Tanya
Hey Tanya

Hows things? I took your advice, made an appointment to see the surgeon and saw him this afternoon. He didnt give me too much of an examination but had a quick look at my foot and agreed that it had dropped a bit. He didnt seem to have any explanation for this or any real solutions either. He muttered something about an ankle fusion or going back to wearing an AFO but then backtracked when he saw the look of horror on my face!

His solution, then, was to go and see him again in 3 months which seems a total cop out to me. Plus he has suggested I see the physio again so I have appointments to see her, although I'm not convinced it will make much difference.

In some ways I'm relieved that what I thought was happening, is happening and that it isnt my fault. As things stand my foot feels quite heavy (I've taken to sitting with my legs crossed to take the weight off it) and I maybe stub my toe once a day or so. I can live with both these things. If it gets worse I guess I'll have to consider other options but the surgeon couldnt tell me if it would get worse or not. :(
Hi GMAC...

:( drat is what I have to say for what you're going through right now...but in the end, I guess a wait and see approach is the best one to take. You never know what is going to happen, and perhaps this is where your foot will stay now for good. Also, never, ever, did I believe that any of this was your fault for not doing all the exercises...no one would ever heal if healing depended on patients doing everything their doctors said they should do...this is really true, and I'm a great example of it...on that note, my ankle was becoming kind of stiff, so I'm doing the exercises a little more frequently now, and they help---thanks for the reminder...:rolleyes:

By this time, you know me Graeme, always full of bright ideas, so be patient with me...perhaps your foot could use a little help like mine sometimes needs. I'm talking about the elastic around the ankle brace with the plastic piece that fits in the shoe laces...I don't even like referring to it as a brace, because all it is is a little assist that does an awful lot. It's very comfortable, you don't see it with pants on, and you wear your regular shoes (without stretching them out beyond recognition.) Anyway, this might be all you ever need, and it certainly beats other more drastic measures like surgery and horrible AFOs. In case your interested, it's called the Foot-UP brace by Ossur, it won't break the bank book, and you can order it online... just order it big enough...also, you can drive with it without taking it off...

As for the physio, I think that's a good idea, and even though your doctor's advice seems like a cop out, it's probably the best advice for now. By May you'll know more, but just waiting can be the most difficult and frustrating part of healing--believe me, I hate all the waiting too... by the way, sitting with your legs crossed is not a good idea, as far as I know, especially if you're crossing your foot drop leg. The peroneal nerve lies along the area that you're putting pressure on when you cross your leg, and I was told not to do this...

Please continue to let me know how you're doing, and take care---Tanya
Hey Tanya

Thanks again for replying, you've been a real rock. I guess I was naiive to think that once the op was done and I'd finished seeing the surgeon, physios etc that that would be it. Not for one moment did I envisage having further problems down the line. After my initial shock (as you could probably tell in my last message :D) I'm not too despondent now. I have physio on Tuesday and that can only be a good thing. Hopefully she will also be able to tell me how she thinks my leg is doing. And I'll need to ask her about not crossing my legs - I had no idea!

Also, my apologies. I was so caught up in my own situation last time I wrote I didnt ask how you were getting on (sorry...). Do you still feel positive overall? Are you happy with the improvements so far? Is there much further for you to go?

Finally, I just want to say how much your support has meant to me. Given we dont know anything about each others lives apart from our common problem, the compassion and care you have shown is really out of this world. I have people here I can talk to but none of them are going thru what I am. So to have the backing and advice from someone who is in the same boat means so much. :)

Graeme
Hi GMAC

I'm so glad that our exchanges have been comforting to you, and it's really nice of you to say so as well---If if remember correctly, it was about this time last year when I was really feeling pretty low. You know how it is--no one to really talk to that would understand this unique problem and no end of inscrutable doctors who mean well, but are not much use in the nuts and bolts of living with drop foot. And then I started posting on this website, and you were the only one who gave me any hope at all that I would drive again--this was something that was driving me crazy and you were the only ray of sunshine during a pretty bleak period, so thank you for your compassion as well!

As for how I'm coming along, well all I can say is that it's a very slow process. I can drive now and I can walk without a brace, and I guess many people (my doctors included, I think) conclude that I'm totally back to normal...but that's not really true. While I am overjoyed and grateful to have come this far, I do think that there is room for more improvement. I can dorsiflex my foot at the ankle, but not as much as my so-called "normal" foot. I see my doctor next fall, and he said that recovery would take until then or perhaps even longer :rolleyes: In the meantime, I'm supposed to do my exercises and continue to gain strength in the foot and leg. Maybe I'll finally be healed by the time I collect Social Security...:D. I'm very happy with my progress so far, and positive as well, but it would be great to have even more healing too.

How's your winter "across the pond." It's been miserable here, and I have to be careful not to slip slide away all over the place--can't wait until spring. How's is going in physio, and do you feel that it's helping? Please let me know how you're doing, and take care.

Tanya
Hola!

Glad to hear you are coming along nicely. Do you notice the lesser dorsiflexion much? Is it restricting your walking? Slightly alarming that your docs think you are "back to normal" when you dont feel that way. I genuinely think that all medical professionals, no matter how well intentioned, can never know what its like to be a patient and feel what we feel, both physically and mentally. I remember seeing my orthotist for years and him talking about AFOs and walking properly etc and I thought, well, you haven't got drop foot - how can you truly know? But maybe thats a bit mean on my part.

Anyway, another wee update for you. Bit of a weird one. Saw the physio last week and she noticed that I had a swelling at the back of my foot (which the surgeon never noticed, the week before.....). She said it was something called bursitis, which is apparently a swelling similar to tendonitis. She also felt that the tendon that had been transferred had gone back to trying to perform its old duties, perhaps because of the bursitis i.e when my brain tried to tell it to dorsiflex it was actually pushing down!! It sounds very weird and all a bit sci-fi but she seems to think if they treat the bursitis and then retrain the tendon we may be able to get a bit more movement out of it.

Back tomorrow to see her so will let you know what the word is.

Take care
Graeme
Hi Graeme---

Thanks for letting me moan and groan about things a bit---I think that doctors tend to look at things a bit differently than we do. My doctors see where I'm coming from and they see tremendous progress...and there is tremendous progress. But I remember completely normal, and I'm not there yet. There are sensory issues of pressure and pulling, which I may always have to deal with. Most times I can ignore them, but sometimes they're really annoying. When this whole thing started last year, I needed a brace to walk and my foot was so weak it couldn't dorsiflex at all. Now I can walk without a brace without tripping, and the more I walk, the better my foot feels--it seems that I have enough dorsiflexion to walk without a problem. Although walking is OK, I notice the issue of less dorsiflexion when I'm driving and going back and forth between the pedals. I have to concentrate on what I'm doing. and it's not an automatic function as it used to be. I'm finding it hard to explain this and it feels as if my foot is stupid and needs to be reminded of what to do or retrained on a very elementary level. Actually, I think your word "weird" describes things perfectly--:D

As for what you're experiencing, now that's really weird!!! From what your physio has observed it seems that when your tendon gets its act together, there's a good chance that you'll be walking just fine again. In some strange way I understand what your talking about, sci-fi or not...you tell the foot to do one thing and you think that it's doing it, but it's not. I actually practice doing certain movements now while looking at my foot so I can be sure it's doing the right thing. Oh boy, this is quite a dialogue. As for your bursitis, this can't be helping your situation any. Perhaps when the bursitis is under control again, the tendon will start to perform properly in its new function. I had bursitis of the shoulder once, and it was quite painful :eek:. Do you feel any discomfort or pain from this area now? Gee, I hope not...
Please take care and let me know what your physio has to say about things and about how you're doing.

Tanya
Someone please give me advice!!! After living with foot drop for about five years now, I am finally at my wits end. I had pelvic cancer, (sarcoma), back in '05 and the doc had to sever two of my nerves, (I'm guessing main one was poroneal), to remove it and left me with right foot drop and hip weakness. To make a long story short, after TONS of research and doctor's appointments I FINALLY got a referral to a Neuro-Surgeon at Johns Hopkins. Needless to say, they just called me an hour ago after reviewing my records and told me that 5 years is WAY too late for them to be able to help me. They did, however, suggest a tendon transfer. Could anyone please enlighten me as to what all is involved in this procedure that may have had a similar condition to my own? I'm weary, and sometimes think I'm either about to throw in the towel...or on the other end of the spectrum I almost want to tell everyone to go to H*** and I'll find my own way to get better, (which is actually an impossibility I know). I miss wearing flip flops and not being able to dance with my husband. I can push down a little bit, but cannot lift up at all. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
[B]Tanya and Graeme[/B]
It has been 7 months since I read your last threads. I note that you are both steaming ahead. I also saw Nikki's thread and just want to tell you to persevere Nikki!

Perhaps sharing some experiences described below may help somebody.

- I stopped wearing the heavy AFO due to the fact that it made the pain worse because of the sensitivity of the foot/outside of the calf. Also as time progressed it quickly became too small which was good news in the fact that the calf was growing again. I came across a footbrace called AFO Toeoff which seems much lighter and user friendly but have yet to try it. Walking is difficult but I have fortunately only tripped twice. I am horribly frustrated that the toes/foot does not want to lift a millimetre.

- I simply had to stop taking all the heavy duty pain killers, and limited myself to a fraction of what I used to take. No more Neurontin/Lyrica/Lentogesic. I have found that very little helps for that nerve pain in the and/or on the toes in any event.

- Some days are very very bad and others quite bearable.

- The pain can be so bad that it seriously drags you down on all fronts. I just soldier on but it is hectic at best.

- Getting up and walking around/in the house helps a great deal, although one hardly wants to at the end of a day.

- Nobody who has not had this can understand it.

- I have stuck to the same Orthopaedic Surgeon but will have to get a second opinion if things don't get better. This cannot do any harm.

- Due to the fact that I broke the asetabelum (hip socket) and fractured the pelvis, I have incredible discomfort in lower buttock, which spreads down the outside of the leg to the foot and that is an event on its own.

I think these facts need to be shared and although not all rosy paints the true picture we experience every day and every night. However bad and however grim I find satisfaction in getting through the day and arriving safely at home and playing with my kids, and that makes it all worth living for at the moment.

Finally I tried my hand at a beer over christmas but quickly gave up since it made me feel really really terrible.

Okay then. Good luck and get on with it.

Elandre
So, is there anyone out there who has had a tendon transfer done for their footdrop? I FINALLY got an appointment with an orthopaedic surgeon next Friday! YAY! My husband and I are going to have to drive 7 hours to see him, but if it can help then it will be well worth it. I'm just trying to find out more about this procedure and the likelihood of my ortho approving me for it. I've had a lot of disappointments over the years, so as you all can imagine I'm trying not to get my hopes up too high for this appointment, but it would be SO wonderful if he schedules me for a tendon transfer!! OH, and new tip: I just bought some new shoes that I overheard someone else in another forum raving about: MBT's. They are pretty darn pricey, but worth every penny. The heel and toe of the shoe do not touch the ground so it gives a more natural rolling motion to your step when you walk. If any of you have developed knee probs since your foot drop, as I have, they take 19% less stress off of your joints and back, and also work your muscles more, (which I'm hoping will help my atrophy). But seriously...if you are looking for a great shoe to improve your step and/or gait, this is it! Anyone with any tendon transfer info, please share!!! Good luck to all and keep your heads up!
[B]Hi Elandre[/B]...it's so good to hear from you---

Thanks for sharing your experiences of the past 7 months. If you notice, the name of this message board is Peroneal Nerve Damage ~ Dropped Foot! 3. Ive been posting since the first message board, Peroneal Nerve Damage ~ Dropped Foot!, and my first posts were anything but encouraging and positive---It has been a hard road the entire time, and only now in the past few months have I noticed positive dorsiflexion and movement. This is a condition that can really try even the most patient person, so hang in there.

From your post, I see that you are under the care of an orthopaedist, and I was too when I fractured my leg...BUT...the problems you are experiencing with dropped foot are caused by nerve damage, which probably occurred during your accident, along with your broken pelvis and hip socket. I'm not qualified to give medical advice in your situation, but from my own experience, the most important doctor that I saw was one super neurosurgeon. He diagnosed my particular problem and offered a surgical solution if I didn't heal on my own. As you probably know from previous posts, I had nerve decompression surgery, which really helped in my situation. I don't know if you've been evaluated by a neurosurgeon yet, but I would strongly recommend that you see one [B]soon[/B]. With nerve injuries like dropped foot, there is a window of opportunity to treat such injuries. If you wait too long, the nerve kind of quits and the doctors are unable to help you anymore. Also, please be aware that there is a world of difference between a neurologist and a neurosurgeon for this condition--- a neurologist basically monitors and tests and treats with medication. A neurosurgeon, however, is the doctor to see in order to assess you condition and suggest a surgical intervention that could really help eliminate the dropped foot. In my case, I can now walk with out a brace. I'm not perfect, and yes, I could even be better, but I'm a heck of a lot better than I was before. I'm really lucky to have found the proper treatment in time.

Although I am much improved in the pain department, I think this is something that I will always feel. Interestingly, my leg seems particularly sensitive before a snow storm, or when the weather is going to change. I took Lyrica for a while, but unfortunately for me, the side effects from this medication were worse than the nerve pain. I've found that certain exercises that I learned in physical therapy really relieve the pulling and strangling sensations that I feel in my lower leg, so I do 15 minutes of exercise every other day at home---not a big price to pay for such pain relief. The exercises involve an inexpensive slant board which you've probably already seen in physiotherapy, and if you're interested, just let me know, and I'll try to describe them in another post. Also, a comfortable AFO could really do a lot to relieve your discomfort... I used a carbon brace from [B][I]Otto Bock[/I][/B] which really helped when I needed it. I walked more, got more exercise, and that really made such a big difference. If you're not able to lift your toes and foot at all, walking must be exhausting for you.

Please take care and let me know how you are doing... Tanya
Thanks for the prompt message Bobby Flay.
My doctors initially gave me a splint/brace that goes inside the shoe and up the back of the leg with a strap going around the calf. It is uncomfortable, but with a soft insert and a thick sock it is just bearable. It keeps my foot at a right angle and enables me to walk quicker without that fear of tripping over my own toes. I saw an orthopaedic surgeon today and I mentioned what I had read on this site regarding braces on overnight etc. He agreed with you and others and said as often as possible wear them because the achilles tendon can shorten overtime if the foot is in drop position alot. Either way I wouldn't have known that if it wasn't for this site. Thank you and others.
I have a tall pair of lace up boots that help as well. I will just make sure it gets some air. When you mentioned "amputation" I nearly fell of my chair. I will definitely not let that happen.
I do feel lucky. I am able to walk. I flew through mid air for about 20 meters and landed like a rag doll. Believe it or not I'm happy with the injuries I have. I remember being in mid air thinking this is going to hurt. I could have ended up paralised or dead.
I have two motorbikes both of which are now being sold. It's a crying shame because it was a big passion of mine. It has taken this accident to make me realise how fragile the body is.
Thank you very much. Keep you informed. Gary
Hello, my name is Scott and I am from Central Wisconsin USA. Two nights ago I badly sprained my left ankle foolishly running down stairs.

Went to the Hospital yesterday and got x-rayed and came back with no broken bones. The doctor was concerned I am not able to Dorsiflex. I was sent home with a brace boot and I have a follow up appointment with an orthopedist doctor in three days.

Thank you for this thread, the doctor told me I could sleep without my new boot but from my readings here that seems to be a bad idea. So I am scared, but I have already learned something from all of your kind sharing.

Here is what my current condition is:
Badly swollen ankle on the outside (but the swelling is going down with ice for 20 minutes with two hour breaks, elevation and aspirin)
Little or no pain
I can lift my toes off the floor but not as much as my good foot
Some numbness on top of foot and top of toes
I cannot Dorsiflex my foot at all except when my heel is on the floor and then only 2 degrees or so
I can push down and move the foot inward very well and outward a little

From extensive internet research it sounds like drop foot is very rare with a sprained ankle, but that it can happen. I also read that sometimes it cures itself over time?

Should I exercise it or not (i.e. exercise moving my toes and dorsiflexing the little that I can)?

Is there anything else I should be doing? Should I be demanding to see some other doctor sooner than three days? I know you cant give med advice…I am just scared and trying to do the right thing.

Again, thanks for the thread. :)
Hello all

Thought I would keep this thread moving along for those still following it and/or looking for advice.

My own situation hasnt changed much in recent months. A few months ago I was worried that my drop foot was going to come back but, touch wood, it seems to be ok, albeit my dorsiflexion never really improved any. I've been having physio most weeks but it hasnt made a great deal of difference.

Also, weirdly, one of the metal brackets that was holding my tendon in place has come loose and is sticking out the top of my foot! At first I thought it was a bone spur but an X-ray showed it to be a piece of metal. It's starting to cause a bit of discomfort so I'm waiting to have it removed (my health insurance expired so I'm waiting on getting it done on the NHS, could take a while....).

To anyone who's had a recent injury or accident, my only advise is to stay positive. It always seems much worst at the start and there is nearly always a solution of sorts to your problem. :)
Hi Graham

Thanks for the heads up and keeping this thread going. I recall the positive message which you gave me in late 2008 and still thank you for it since I did feel pretty sorry for myself at the time and I confess ever so often after that.

However please let me know how (in what way) your drop foot improved despite little dorsiflexion. Do you still wear a foot brace? Has the nerve pain improved or stopped?

Personally, my drop foot has not improved any (June 2008), but it fortunately does not drag much, which makes it possible to walk (with a limp) but no foot brace. I have no dorsiflexion and no sideways movement.

I would however like to share the following:

* I often feel very depressed, which I think is normal considering the result
of what one has ended up with, but it has to be managed and one has to
look ahead.

* Pain medication, like Lentogesic/Lyrica contributes to making one feel low,
but should also be managed.

* On the rare occassions when I have taken a longish walk or exercised I
felt much better, and although I hate to admit it getting fit will no doubt
contribute to feeling better generally and getting stronger.

* The discomfort, pain and disability can be managed although it is difficult
and takes time.

I have been fortunate enough to be able to return to work and get my head working although I must have looked spaced out at times. Nothing in this process is easy but like you said way back one must get on with it and deal with the issue.

Again thanks for your contribution.

Finally our Springboks are going to hammer the British Lions! Hopefully.

All the best!!!
Hi Elandre

Nice to hear from you. First of all, there's no shame in sometimes letting your head go down or feeling frustrated with your situation. It's only natural. I felt that way for a very long time and still do from time to time. I've had since 1994 to get used to it but it still gets you down on occasion! :dizzy:

I guess everyone's situation is different. My tendon transfer operation meant my foot is pretty much fixed at 90 degrees now. So although I can't dorsiflex up the way, it doesnt fall down as it used to. I hated wearing the AFO/splint so not having that has made a big difference and has also eased the problems I had on the sole of my foot, ulcerations, hard skin etc. There were some days when the foot pain was so sore I couldn't focus. So that's another thing to be positive about.

I remember at the time of my accident the nerve pain was really bad. But it went away after a few months I think. I was on medication for the best part of 9 months to a year but didnt need any after that. It may not even have been as long as that.

Have you been swimming? If not I'd recommend it as soon as you feel up to it. I wasnt a big swimmer before but, because I couldnt really run or play football/soccer any more, I started swimming a lot more. Even now I try and go about twice a week. It stimulates the muscles etc without putting extra pressure on the bones. Very worthwhile.

It is good that you don't have to wear a brace. Did the doctors recommend one to you? Maybe it would make things easier for you if you had one, even if it was just for when you were feeling tired etc. Before my operation, I could walk without my AFO but only by lifting my foot from the knee or hip so it wasnt very natural.

As for the Lions, I think they will have a great chance as they havent picked many Scottish players - we were terrible in the 6 Nations!

Talk soon
Graeme
Hello All,
I haven't posted in this forum for some time, but I have read through a few of the messages and I am always grateful for everyone's input and information. Any information is always a helpful thing on "drop foot island."

I am curious about people's AFO stories. Graham, I was having similar trouble with foot calluses / rawness on my non-affected foot due to no brace becasue of odd weight bearing behavior. I'm managing it now, but I was shocked how quickly it came on, and within 2 days it became unbearable even in bed.

I am currently using my 3rd and 4th brace versions and am using them in conjunction with one another. The first was a giant, thick fiberglass version, fitted by a specialist in an ortho office. It was not unlike a cast for a broken ankle / foot with the front of it open and several small and large velcro closures. It made stairs and sitting impossible and thus was used twice and never again, not to mention I would have to buy sneakers 2 sizes larger than my foot size. Next I fell for the advertising of a "soft" version that could be worn with or without shoes that was useless and expensive - think of an elastic version of gladiator shoes. The latest versions that I ordered are also soft. One laces through your sneaker (or dress shoe for men I suppose) and has two velcro straps that you attach to a very soft velcro cuff that goes around your mid calf. The brace basically keeps your foot from dropping too much through the tension of the straps. It wasn't quite enough for me, so I use it with brace number 4, also a velcro cuff with a fastener in the front. A wide plastic tongue is laced into the front portion of the sneaker with a tail that has the opposing side of the faster attached via tough elastic material. Together the two fastener pieces (From front of leg brace and top of sneaker) snap together and lock (with a good deal of effort). You'd be right to think none of this is fun or greatly comfortable, but for the first time in 9 months I was able to walk for excercise. I did it on the treadmill so I could still hold on to the handrails for now, but honestly it felt great! I don't wear the brace all day, but put it on to excercise or go shopping or longer walking errands. I really was shocked to realize just how slowly I've been walking and started to become accustomed to the pace. I'm 36 and felt 80. However, I knew I had to look for alternatives when the knee on my unaffected leg started really hurting due to the sideways pressure I was putting on it by my steepage gate.
I haven't yet tried any of the long / structured braces after the first horrible one, but would like to hear about anyone's expereince.

Elandre, it is very easy to get depressed, I really understand what you mean. However the worst part to me is no information, no good advice, and really no treatment by doctors (I've seen 7). So I'm really happy to have found this forum and to hear anyone else's stories of what is working for you or not.

Also, Graham I'm really glad to hear about the swimming advice. I wanted to ask about it, because my leg weakness is pretty overwhelming, and I didn't know what that would mean under water - although I did have quite a good chuckle at the thought of swimming in circles because one "rudder" wasn't working! :) Thanks for the advice.

Cheers, Mary
Hi all -

I developed drop foot from a long hospital stay due to Acute Pancreatitis. I was sedated for about 6 weeks, and bascially I woke up and had it in both legs. No one can explain to me what, why, when, how, etc. It has been 13 months since the "injury", and I have seen some strength improvments, but no motor improvments. I have been told it will take 18-24 months to recover, if it recovers. So thus far, I have just been doing the PT, and playing the waiting game. I have not had any surgeries yet, because every doctor has told me to wait to see what I get back, then go from there.
This board is a great refresher, especially seeing some New Yorkers on here - Tanya8, CloneXX, Lynn1991, etc. I am new here and dont know all the "rules" but I would love to talk to some of the locals about doctors, PT places, etc. I dont think we are allowed to post personal e-mails on here, but if there is a way to chat, please let me know. Thanks so much and good luck to all.
[QUOTE=gmac1975;3995223]Hello all

Thought I would keep this thread moving along for those still following it and/or looking for advice.

My own situation hasnt changed much in recent months. A few months ago I was worried that my drop foot was going to come back but, touch wood, it seems to be ok, albeit my dorsiflexion never really improved any. I've been having physio most weeks but it hasnt made a great deal of difference.

Also, weirdly, one of the metal brackets that was holding my tendon in place has come loose and is sticking out the top of my foot! At first I thought it was a bone spur but an X-ray showed it to be a piece of metal. It's starting to cause a bit of discomfort so I'm waiting to have it removed (my health insurance expired so I'm waiting on getting it done on the NHS, could take a while....).

To anyone who's had a recent injury or accident, my only advise is to stay positive. It always seems much worstThan at the start and there is nearly always a solution of sorts to your problem. :)[/QUOTE]


Hi Graeme,

I'm so glad that you have sort of a fixable mechanical problem and that your drop foot is not returning! ---sorry to hear that you'll need another surgery, but this one will only make your improved situation better, so I hope it won't be that bad after all.
As for myself, things are pretty much the same, except that the function I've regained is becoming more natural, and I don't think about "the foot" as much anymore. Although I can't say that my drop foot side is as normal as my unaffected foot, I've regained enough function to stop thinking about it so much---which is a really great thing. Remember how worried I was that I would never be able to drive again? Thanks for keeping me going with your unique brand of GMAC encouragement!
I still try to exercise my foot and ankle by always stepping and walking and doing more difficult movements with the drop foot side in my own home-made efforts to regain maximum function. Right now I'm working on the nuances of balance by forcing the right side to get with the program---I think it helps, and who knows---maybe it does.
Take care :D and let me know how you're doing and when you're going in for your surgery--Tanya[LIST]
[/LIST]
Tanya - Does the type of surgery have to do anything with releasing your Fascia? This is something that has been mentioned to me in recent weeks in addition to the nerve decompression surgery.

This board has been a blessing. It is so great to see all these great ideas floating around, since I have not had too many from doctors. I look forward to spending a lot of time on here.

I was also considering starting a Facebook group for this issue if there is any interest!
[QUOTE=Tanya8;4026242]Hi Graeme,

I'm so glad that you have sort of a fixable mechanical problem and that your drop foot is not returning! ---sorry to hear that you'll need another surgery, but this one will only make your improved situation better, so I hope it won't be that bad after all.
As for myself, things are pretty much the same, except that the function I've regained is becoming more natural, and I don't think about "the foot" as much anymore. Although I can't say that my drop foot side is as normal as my unaffected foot, I've regained enough function to stop thinking about it so much---which is a really great thing. Remember how worried I was that I would never be able to drive again? Thanks for keeping me going with your unique brand of GMAC encouragement!
I still try to exercise my foot and ankle by always stepping and walking and doing more difficult movements with the drop foot side in my own home-made efforts to regain maximum function. Right now I'm working on the nuances of balance by forcing the right side to get with the program---I think it helps, and who knows---maybe it does.
Take care :D and let me know how you're doing and when you're going in for your surgery--Tanya[LIST]
[/LIST][/QUOTE]

Hi pal,

Thanks for the nice words. My situation is ok I guess. The op I need will be pretty minor and will only need a local anasthaetic (sp?!). Not sure what difference it will make but it wont do any harm.

My biggest problem now is my Achilles. It gets really tight quite easily and when it's like that it's a bit harder to walk. I have to confess to being a bit lax with my exercises so it's pretty much my own fault :D The drop foot doesnt seem too much of a problem (touch wood) but I remember you talking about SAFOs so decided to send away to them for some brochure just in case - so thanks for that!

The best thing is still not having to wear the AFO. It's really warm over here right now and I decided to wear shorts to work last night - just because I could! Before I used to dread summer as I hated showing the AFO so now the opposite seems to apply.

Your progress has been phenomenal. Is there still more to come do you think? Or are you happy now with what you've got? Thanks also to you for all your encouragement and advice - a virtual high five coming your way ;) x
[QUOTE=gmac1975;4028221]Hi pal,

Thanks for the nice words. My situation is ok I guess. The op I need will be pretty minor and will only need a local anasthaetic (sp?!). Not sure what difference it will make but it wont do any harm.

My biggest problem now is my Achilles. It gets really tight quite easily and when it's like that it's a bit harder to walk. I have to confess to being a bit lax with my exercises so it's pretty much my own fault :D The drop foot doesnt seem too much of a problem (touch wood) but I remember you talking about SAFOs so decided to send away to them for some brochure just in case - so thanks for that!

The best thing is still not having to wear the AFO. It's really warm over here right now and I decided to wear shorts to work last night - just because I could! Before I used to dread summer as I hated showing the AFO so now the opposite seems to apply.

Your progress has been phenomenal. Is there still more to come do you think? Or are you happy now with what you've got? Thanks also to you for all your encouragement and advice - a virtual high five coming your way ;) x[/QUOTE]

Hi friend! :wave:

So good to hear from you, and I'm glad you're enjoying your summer. This summer is great for me to, since this year I'm not wearing an AFO as well. As for the SAFO's and AFO's, and all such things, they are great when you need them, but I'd rather not need them at all. In addition to the SAFO that I told you about, there is also a small little brace called a Foot UP by Ossur (don't know if the website will block this info.) I used this one for a few months and it was quite helpful, and not nearly as expensive as the SAFO type. Sometimes less is more, and if you just need a little assist, it can be very helpful. Also, I could drive quite well with this brace. The only disadvantage is that you have to wear lace up shoes to wear it, but since I'm always in sneakers anyway, this was not problem. Actually, I'm really hoping that you don't need anything at all, but it's always better to have the info just in case.

As for myself, I am happy with the progress I've made so far, but I think there is still more to come. I go through periods of pretty good function, and minimal discomfort, and then all of a sudden, "the nerve" can get really annoying and nasty (like now)---after a couple of days of this, the discomfort goes away, and I always notice some sort of improvement after these spells. Right now I'm 1 year out from surgery, and I think that after 2 years the nerve will be finished with whatever healing it wants to do. Mostly in the past 3 months I've noticed a lot of strength returning to the foot and driving has become much more natural.

Also, I'm getting really lazy with the exercise too--this is just human nature, but I'll get back to it again. I definitely feel better when I do the exercises---take care and a big virtual high five right back at you! Please let me know when you have your surgery and how you are doing. Usually when you only need a local anesthetic, the surgery is not too involved (hope so.) Good Luck with this and keep in touch.

Tanya
welcome to the forum. I'm so sorry to hear about your having drop foot, and I hope you'll eventually recover function. As for your question about releasing the fascia, I have to admit that I really don't know the answer to that. When a nerve is released they release the sheath surrounding the nerve, and that's about the extent of my knowledge. Take care and feel better!

Tanya
Hello,
I am new here, and I am soooooooo thankful to find other people with this issue. I have read some of the posts, not all and just curious to know what people have done to help increase the functioning of their foot.

I was in a motorcycle accidnt on mothers day, and shattered my hip and fractured my tibia in about 6 places. The drop foot started happening in the hopsital, and now that I am healing home and doing therapy it really is not getting better. I have numbess in my first 2-3 toes and side of my foot and on nerve medicine to help with the pain (which helps for the most part but not 100%). I have a stock AFO from the hospital which helps with walking, but now not sleeping with the brace at night in the morning it is hard to put my foot flat on the floor. I am not putting all of my weight down (its progressive within the next 4 weeks) and still walking with crutches, but I have the whole steppage gait when walking without the brace. I went to an orthotist so I am waiting for a custom AFO and night splint, which is this scary looking boot. And I had to buy a huge sneaker due to the AFO and getting my toes into a shoe is very hard because they just ram down into it. How did anyone deal with this issue?

I went to a neurologist who was not optimistic or positive. She did the EMG and pretty much dismissed anymore healing. She was like it's been 3 months I am not getting a response, well it could be worse, see me in 6 weeks as I am sitting there crying. She did not recommend anything to do next, so that is where any suggestions from those with experience will help. WHERE DO I GO FROM HERE??? I am going to find a different neurologist, but do I find a surgeon to? Any suggestions or advice will help.
Hi There JRosa...I've was in your exact situation a year and a half ago, but now I'm walking without a brace---so there is hope for your situation. Like you, my first neurologist just brushed off any more healing, and just wanted to wait and wait it out. As you know, or should know from reading the previous posts, there is a time limit when trying to fix nerve issues. I don't know if your injury can be helped or not, but a real specialist in these matters will be able to let you know where you stand. The best advice I can give you is to get yourself to a large medical facility in New York City, such as Columbia University Medical Center or New York-Presbyterian Hospital---you can look them up on the Internet. Don't stay on the Island for this type of medical care. Neurologists just test, but neurosurgeons DO! Take a cab, hijack a friend, but go to NYC for your care.

As for the shoe and brace issues, they are a real pain. For a while I wore two different shoes---my regular shoe on my normal foot and an elastic shoe by Orthofeet on my drop-foot foot. I was a real sight, but I didn't care...it's late, but post again, and I'll try to answer any questions you may have---take care, Tanya
Hey I am new here as well, I am suffering from drop foot. I dont know if it is permanent since none of my doctors can seem to answer that... I am a 22 year old mom who while pushing my quad down an incline trying to pop start it, I hit a pot hole and dislocated my knee. My foot started going numb almost as soon as the injury occured. I went to the er and the doctor pretty much played it off as nothing. He popped my knee back into socket and told me to go see my follow up doctor and talk to him about what needs to happen next. Well when I went to see him he told me that I might have to get an amputation because the er doctor didnt do an arterogram to see if my artery was severed or injured. I immediatly started to cry. Not even caring about the fact I couldnt feel my foot. Well I went to my arterogram and they told me everything in that area was fine. So I went to see a different doctor yet again and he told me I severely injured my knee. He also told me that I either ripped my nerve or stretched it. He said if its stretched then I will be able to regain my use of my foot. But he couldnt help me since I severely damaged my knee and have to go to a knee specialist to have my knee reconstructed. So now I am in waiting and the injury occured over a month ago. I have an appointment to see a knee specialist who "loves knee dislocations" that scares me a bit... lol, I have a sleeping imobilizer but still am waiting for a walking one. I have my knee completely imoblized and its in constant pain.. I know this doesnt help anyone but I just need to talk about it and hear others stories as well to feel like I am not alone... THX
Hi all. Gary from Melbourne Australia.
I first posted a thread here in April after coming of my motorbike. Straight after the accident I couldn't dorsiflex my right foot.
I had ligament/cartilage damage behind the knee as well but the orthpaedic surgeon didn't want to touch anything until my nerve damage was sorted out.
I had what I call the electric shock test down my leg to determine how bad the nerve damage was. Basically it was bad.
All of the doctors were saying give it time give it time etc.
I waited four months and didn't get one ounce of improvement. My plastic surgeon basically said what do you want to do. A nerve transfer or a nerve graft?
He explained to me that every time you join a nerve you lose half its strength.
There are more joins involved in a nerve graft so I opted for a nerve transfer.
A nerve tells the muscles what to do.
The operation went well according to the surgeon. They inspected the existing nerve damage and found that the peroneal nerve was severed. That was actually a good thing because that proved that we were doing the right thing with the transfer. It was severed behind the knee. They did a transfer lower down the leg. They took a good nerve from the inside of my leg and sort of dragged it across to join on to the remaining peroneal nerve. This new junction was lower than the existing nerve damage. They did it lower so that there was less nerve to re-grow. The new nerve junction is near my calf. Apparently nerve grows at a millimetre a day. With only 150millimetres of nerve to grow it could possibly be grown in 150 days which I'm pleased about. Had the operation 5 weeks ago. No news or movement yet.
Hope all this made sense.
Any questions feel free to ask. Gary
Hey guys,

I am a recent college grad who, one month after graduation, was wrestling with a friend when my left knee dislocated, tearing my acl and lcl, tearing part of my hamstring and completely rupturing my peroneal nerve (unfortunately, it was so swollen the initial doctor said it was simply a sprain, and after three days of agony I finally went for a second opinion...)

Now, the knee doesn't worry me, I played four years of club lacrosse in college on horrible, old turf and am not surprised if it may have been weakened in those times. I had the LCL and hamstring repaired at the end of July (where they were able to spot that the peroneal nerve was severed, and not simply stretched) and am finishing rehabbing it right now, still not weight bearing but nearing full range of motion (I'm figuring the ACL will be fixed down the line, it just kinda sucks that I won't be able to play lacrosse, hockey or basketball for a year or two...) They've got me in a pretty basic AFO even though I'm not weight bearing in order to keep my Achilles stretched when wearing a shoe, and keeping off the unnecessary weight of wearing a boot.

My knee surgeon referred me to a foot specialist and he immediately suggested a tendon transfer in order to allow me to be able to lift my foot again. He also stated the goal of the surgery is only a smooth gait without the aid of a brace, but stated that many people were able to go well beyond.

I'm wondering if anyone has severed the nerve and regained a decent amount of mobility/strength. I am currently getting the work done at TRIA in Bloomington, MN (I don't know if anyone's heard of it...) but it appears as though many of the doctors their are the best in MN, if that means anything, haha.

Any input is incredibly appreciated,
Jack
Hi everyone,

Hope you're all doing well and finding out answers. I had the tendon transfer operation of the post-tib tendon about 18 months ago. Not got a helluva lot of movement but the foot is no longer dropping (as much) which is the main thing I guess.

Randomly a metal bracket came loose in my foot (think it was there to hold the transferred tendon in place but is doing nothing now) so going into hosp in a few weeks to get it taken out. Am hoping it helps somehow!

Anyway, just wanted to say hi and hope everyone's doing ok

Graeme
Hey Graeme...just sending up a flare to see how you're doing!

Sorry to hear you have to go to the hospital again, but if that bracket is not doing anything, I guess it's better if it comes out. Please post before you go to the hospital so I can root for you.

I'm coming along, as they say, and my progress is so gradual I don't really notice anything anymore...but when I think of how I was walking or driving 2 or 3 months ago, I do realize that I'm still making progress . I went to the doctor for a checkup, and he was very positive about how things are turning out. I asked him if I would continue to improve, and he said that healing could continue for another couple of years! I think this is unbelievable, don't you? What a long-winded recovery this has turned out to be!!!! The latest difference I'm seeing now is with balance and navigating uneven terrain---there was some function between my brain and my foot that was just not clicking, but all of a sudden this seems to be getting back to normal.

In any case, I just wanted to wish you the very best in your upcoming surgery. Perhaps with that bracket out of the way, you'll experience more comfort and function---I hope so---

Take care, Tanya
Cheers Tanya. Going in on Monday so hopefully will be quite straightforward.

Your progress is unbelievable! I actually think you might go so far to be actually in a better shape by the end than when this all started for you! :D

If you ever want to get in touch directly I'm on my username here at hot mail d o t c o m
Well I finally have an emg schedualed for the 22nd and I hope I will get some answers from that. I have been dealing with peroneal nerve damage resulting from a knee dislocation. I had terrible pain for the first month then it lessened to about a twinge here and there. I am told by my doctor he will refuse to give me my surgery to correct the pcl acl mcl and meniscus tear if I cant bend my knee to 90 degrees. Well its been 3 months and still cannot bear the pain. I can get it to 90 but the pain makes me want to hit someone. What would you do? Keep seeing that dr or yet another. He is the third os I have seen.. I am starting to go slightly mad.. He is the only knee specialist in my area. Yikes I wish this was easier to deal with.. I am sorry to hear about everyone elses misfortune but it is also nice to know that I am not alone. DROP FOOT IS THE PITS!!
Hi has anyone out there had a dropped foot and had a succesfull recovery, and been able to walk again normally, without surgery or using an AFO.I am so sick of living in hope, its been eighteen months since my accident, all I hear from the medical people nerves can take up to two years to repair.
From reading this forum and another I have found out the following: The EMG should be done 4 months after the surgery, the longer one waits to identify the problem, the less likely they are to achieve full recovery. I called Dr. Naths who told me because my doctor waited so long for the EMG I am no longer a candidate for nerve transfer. The EMG identifies if nerve decompression can help get rid of the drop foot. I have heard from 2 other people on the west coast who had nerve decompression and walked without a tendon transfer and one person who had nerve compression and 2 tendon transfers through their HMO walkimg again.

I my case the AFO brace was a waste since my left foot turned in immediately after the total hip replacement, meaning me foot turned in while the brace in my shoe went to the right. Very painful..I am wearing BORN shoes now....and getting ready to go for the EMG and tendon transfers if needed.

All I understand is that time is of the essence with drop foot, I did PT for 4 months, had a walker and an AFO brace but the AFO brace makes my right ankle weak-all between Oct. 2008 through July of 2009, now I am in a wheelchair..awaiting an EMG....

One must advocate for themselves to get the EMG and tendon transfers..they work for some people, mind was a result of car accident and then problems during surgery...

Hope this helps...Read Tanya8 posting, she identified the right hospitals...Good luck
Hi Tanya , I cant find any new news from you, how are you doing with the foot, you seem to give us all much hope, would be good to hear from you.
Cheers Pamela 43::
[QUOTE=pamela 43;4110734]Hi Tanya , I cant find any new news from you, how are you doing with the foot, you seem to give us all much hope, would be good to hear from you.
Cheers Pamela 43::[/QUOTE]

Hi Pamela

Sorry you've had such a hard time of it these past eighteen months. If you look at my previous posts you will know that I had drop foot after a broken leg and that I had nerve release surgery, which really helped in my case. I can walk without a brace and drive, but my drop foot is not as strong as my normal foot. I still think I'm healing and will see more progress.

Since drop foot occurs from many different causes, it's really difficult to say how one person or another will eventually heal. Also, I really don't know much about your situation, so it's difficult to have a dialogue about what you're experiencing. I can tell you that the healing of the peroneal nerve does take a very long time, whether you have medical intervention or not. For me it has been about eighteen months so far. Also, an AFO is supposed to help with your mobility. By using the foot and exercising it you keep your muscles toned and ready for when the nerve eventually does heal. Please take care and post if you have any questions.

Feel better--Tanya





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