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Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) (CRPS) Message Board


Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) (CRPS) Board Index


I am a new member and suffer from Short Term Memory problems and a variety of other problems that relate to RSD. If I make posting mistakes, please help me.

I was formally diagnosed with RSD just two weeks ago. This is my 2nd episode with it.

The first was after surgery for a neuroma in my right foot, overlapping fourth toe and claw toe. I had already had cortizone injections then sclerosing injections for the neuroma without relief. My surgeon kept telling me that the pain, swelling, burning, sensitivity etc. was normal. Come back in 6 weeks and we'll see how you are doing then. Never having health problems and not knowing about RSD, I put my faith in him and suffered. After I pestered him for months he ordered PT. By then I was neering stage 3. PT was painful and exhausting. Slowly, my foot and ankle responded and am only having minor problems with it now.

In early December, 2005 I had surgery on the left foot for claw toe, small and large toe bunions. A flare-up of RSD started within days. My surgeon reacted in the same fashion. My family doctor referred me to a Pain Center.

[U]Treatment 1[/U]
I have had three treatments so far. The first lasted for just a few minutes. It was a lumbar epidural injection of [B]Depo-Medrol[/B] into the sympathetic nerve . I was given [B]Sublimaze[/B] and [B]Versed[/B] by IV. The procedure was done using flouroscopy to guide the needle (very important). There was immediate relief. My foot warmed up, swelling/pain were reduced and the color improved tremendously.

[U]Treatment 2[/U]
Three days later I had the same procedure above. Tubing and an infusion pump were added to the epidural site. A drip of [B]Naropin[/B] was given for approx. 20 hours. I was very closely monitored. Numbness was experienced in my left and later right leg. The drip was slowed down, stopped, restarted, slowed down, stopped, restared. The Numbness was completely gone before I was released.

[U]Treatment 3[/U]
Three more days later they repeated treatment 2. The drip was maintained at the slower rate. I did not have any numbness. I was more comfortable and rested better through that night than I have since the surgery. When the nurse came to turn everything off and remove the tubing, etc. I asked if I could keep it on and stay for another night. Of course, she told me no.

I will follow up with the Pain Center M.D. in 10 days. Am seeing my family M.D. in 2 days for referral to PT. There has been a huge improvement from the Sympathetic Nerve Blocks. I was scared out of my mind and made my two grown-up daughters and husband stay with me in shifts for Treatment 2. For Treatment 3 my daughter stayed with me until the drip was set up, husband visited when his work shift was over, a friend visited for a short time and daughter picked me up the next day. I know that hard work in PT is needed to restore full function to my foot and get things under control. Now instead of feeling wiped out and frustrated, I am looking forward to getting moving again.

No regrets about the Sympathetic Nerve Block procedure that was used for me. I asked questions every step of the way before they did each step. What procedures, what drugs. I'm sure I asked the same questions over and over and had them write things down because of my short term memory problems. Not once did anyone get annoyed with me. You have a right to know every detail. The Pain Center M.D. also told me that there are procedures to help prevent this from happening if you have surgery again. I still need large and small toe bunion surgery on the right foot so it is a relief to know this.

Good luck to all.
Hi Sealover! You got that right! Alot of people don't get dx'd right away and alot of people could save alot of grief and medical bills and stress, if they were dx'd correctly. :rolleyes: That's the problem. It's not a new disease, but I think it is becoming more understood with awareness, but the medical profession still has along way to come. I myself have noticed the new med students that are in some of my doctor's offices who are in training. Whether I am there for me or my kids, they are very anxious to see whar RSD looks like. It upsets my kids if they are with me, because they are paying more attention to me and they don't want to keep hearing the short story, but these new med students are amazed at the color changes in my hand, the movement disorder, etc. I think the newer med students are getting a better education than some of the older dr's. Awareness is the key. We on this board eat sleep and live RSD and the pain, but there are alot of those who are oblivious to the fact. They know what MS is but not what RSD is. That's how I describe it to people. "It's like MS, but instead of the muscels involved the nerves are, and they keep misfiring in the central nervous system", & they seem right away to get the jist of it.
I read Sealover that the cortizone shots gave you fat pad atrophy on the ball of your RSD foot. I, too had cortizone injections into my left rib cage, 2-- to be exact, and I had breast implants done 2 years before my injury. Well for some strange reason, and all my doctor's have never even heard of this, granted I am a slender person, my left breast implant exploded and caused massive scarring from the coritizone injections! :eek: Not to mention PAIN!!!! The dr. injected them behind my left rib in the back of me. I guess we are all guniea pigs in away. By breast doctor, told me he would fix the scarring, whenever they figured out what was wrong with me, but I never went back. They also tried to give me oral cortizone, and I broke out in a rash from head to toe, so they just assumed that I am allergic to cortizone. I wonder if anyone else has had a problem with cortizone??? My physical therapist told me that you are only supposed to get no more than 3 cortizone injections a year, or your muscle tissue is like paper and it will become very brittle.
I doubt though that you will get much relief from the lumbar block, but you never know till you try. Go into it with an open mind and pray that it helps. Good luck and keep us posted. Aloha Skooze
[COLOR=RoyalBlue]Hi sealover,

An epidural block is put into the epidural space in your spine. This is in the center of your spine. A lumbar block goes between the vertebra in your spine and it's off to the side a bit. This is my understanding, anyway. As far as people being diagnosed after having had RSD for a while. Yes, it's very common. You can hear that from people so often, it's sad. I had RSD for over three years before being diagnosed. That was in the mid-1980s. I would have thought that by this point, it would be a little less common for that to happen, but it doesn't seem like it is.

Hope this answers your question a little. Good luck.

Sharon :)[/COLOR]
[QUOTE=Leftie;2179231]I am a new member and suffer from Short Term Memory problems and a variety of other problems that relate to RSD. If I make posting mistakes, please help me.

I was formally diagnosed with RSD just two weeks ago. This is my 2nd episode with it.

The first was after surgery for a neuroma in my right foot, overlapping fourth toe and claw toe. I had already had cortizone injections then sclerosing injections for the neuroma without relief. My surgeon kept telling me that the pain, swelling, burning, sensitivity etc. was normal. Come back in 6 weeks and we'll see how you are doing then. Never having health problems and not knowing about RSD, I put my faith in him and suffered. After I pestered him for months he ordered PT. By then I was neering stage 3. PT was painful and exhausting. Slowly, my foot and ankle responded and am only having minor problems with it now.

In early December, 2005 I had surgery on the left foot for claw toe, small and large toe bunions. A flare-up of RSD started within days. My surgeon reacted in the same fashion. My family doctor referred me to a Pain Center.

[U]Treatment 1[/U]
I have had three treatments so far. The first lasted for just a few minutes. It was a lumbar epidural injection of [B]Depo-Medrol[/B] into the sympathetic nerve . I was given [B]Sublimaze[/B] and [B]Versed[/B] by IV. The procedure was done using flouroscopy to guide the needle (very important). There was immediate relief. My foot warmed up, swelling/pain were reduced and the color improved tremendously.

[U]Treatment 2[/U]
Three days later I had the same procedure above. Tubing and an infusion pump were added to the epidural site. A drip of [B]Naropin[/B] was given for approx. 20 hours. I was very closely monitored. Numbness was experienced in my left and later right leg. The drip was slowed down, stopped, restarted, slowed down, stopped, restared. The Numbness was completely gone before I was released.

[U]Treatment 3[/U]
Three more days later they repeated treatment 2. The drip was maintained at the slower rate. I did not have any numbness. I was more comfortable and rested better through that night than I have since the surgery. When the nurse came to turn everything off and remove the tubing, etc. I asked if I could keep it on and stay for another night. Of course, she told me no.

I will follow up with the Pain Center M.D. in 10 days. Am seeing my family M.D. in 2 days for referral to PT. There has been a huge improvement from the Sympathetic Nerve Blocks. I was scared out of my mind and made my two grown-up daughters and husband stay with me in shifts for Treatment 2. For Treatment 3 my daughter stayed with me until the drip was set up, husband visited when his work shift was over, a friend visited for a short time and daughter picked me up the next day. I know that hard work in PT is needed to restore full function to my foot and get things under control. Now instead of feeling wiped out and frustrated, I am looking forward to getting moving again.

No regrets about the Sympathetic Nerve Block procedure that was used for me. I asked questions every step of the way before they did each step. What procedures, what drugs. I'm sure I asked the same questions over and over and had them write things down because of my short term memory problems. Not once did anyone get annoyed with me. You have a right to know every detail. The Pain Center M.D. also told me that there are procedures to help prevent this from happening if you have surgery again. I still need large and small toe bunion surgery on the right foot so it is a relief to know this.

Good luck to all.[/QUOTE]
I know how you feel and am heartened by what you describe. I was told I had RSD 12 years ago when I had surgery for neuroma removal. Was in pain for over a year. Now am facing surgery again as it is causing me problems. Glad to know you made it through.





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