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Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) (CRPS) Message Board


Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) (CRPS) Board Index


The ketamine coma is now only being done in Mexcio as it's not "legal" here in the US. At one point it was Germany and Mexico. Dr Schwartzman in PA is the doc you're probable referring to. He was sending a few to Germany. Dr Kirkpatrick here in FL sends a few to Mexico. You have to be the worst of the worst in order to even go. Such as being totally incapacitated bedbound kind of thing, have undergone every treatment available and then some and be maxed out on every medication known to man. lol That's my own wording of course but you get the gist of it.

There are very significant risks when being treated with it in any form, such as the infusions. The infusions are the only thing being done here in the US and only be a very few docs. I'm not even sure who all does it anymore. It's 5 days in hospital with low doses. I think the name may come from the fact that while being "dosed" with ketamine you have hallucinations. I remember one woman a couple of years or maybe it was 3 or 4 now.....anyway, she had the low dose and even when the treatment ended she kept on having hallucinations, disorientation and was just feeling pretty sick overall. As usual these things affect everyone different afterwards but the hallucinations during the infusion are pretty standard. You always have to have boosters too. The main reason why it's not a more widespread treatment is because the statistics show that there isn't a big enough long term gain in enough people. I've read mainly about the coma stats and there is a "big" improvement for the ones treated in that their pain comes down a lot, the sensitivity,etc. They can walk again for the first time in years but the longest remission reported by doc K was 3 years for 1 person. Relief initially was awesome but remission was never achieved.

Dr. Schwartzman has sent a total of 38 patients to Germany for treatment with the ketamine coma. Every patient in whom a coma is induced does well initially, but the pain returns in 55% to 60% of cases. The coma’s side effects—precipitous weight loss, sleep disruption, anxiety, weakness and the usual complications of critical care medicine—are potentially serious. These are the other things I couldn't remember for "side effects. LOL

Dr S does do the infusions and insurance will not pay for it. Treatment one time costs about $10,000. Most of us just don't have that kind of money and probably never will unless we win millions in the lottery. LOLOL

It really is a treatment of last resort. The expense of it alone is a big reason more people don't get it.

Hope this sheds some light on it all for you. :)

Hugs,

Karen
[QUOTE=Gaollan;3877821]The ketamine coma is now only being done in Mexcio as it's not "legal" here in the US. At one point it was Germany and Mexico. Dr Schwartzman in PA is the doc you're probable referring to. He was sending a few to Germany. Dr Kirkpatrick here in FL sends a few to Mexico. You have to be the worst of the worst in order to even go. Such as being totally incapacitated bedbound kind of thing, have undergone every treatment available and then some and be maxed out on every medication known to man. lol That's my own wording of course but you get the gist of it.

There are very significant risks when being treated with it in any form, such as the infusions. The infusions are the only thing being done here in the US and only be a very few docs. I'm not even sure who all does it anymore. It's 5 days in hospital with low doses. I think the name may come from the fact that while being "dosed" with ketamine you have hallucinations. I remember one woman a couple of years or maybe it was 3 or 4 now.....anyway, she had the low dose and even when the treatment ended she kept on having hallucinations, disorientation and was just feeling pretty sick overall. As usual these things affect everyone different afterwards but the hallucinations during the infusion are pretty standard. You always have to have boosters too. The main reason why it's not a more widespread treatment is because the statistics show that there isn't a big enough long term gain in enough people. I've read mainly about the coma stats and there is a "big" improvement for the ones treated in that their pain comes down a lot, the sensitivity,etc. They can walk again for the first time in years but the longest remission reported by doc K was 3 years for 1 person. Relief initially was awesome but remission was never achieved.

Dr. Schwartzman has sent a total of 38 patients to Germany for treatment with the ketamine coma. Every patient in whom a coma is induced does well initially, but the pain returns in 55% to 60% of cases. The coma’s side effects—precipitous weight loss, sleep disruption, anxiety, weakness and the usual complications of critical care medicine—are potentially serious. These are the other things I couldn't remember for "side effects. LOL

Dr S does do the infusions and insurance will not pay for it. Treatment one time costs about $10,000. Most of us just don't have that kind of money and probably never will unless we win millions in the lottery. LOLOL

It really is a treatment of last resort. The expense of it alone is a big reason more people don't get it.

Hope this sheds some light on it all for you. :)

Hugs,

Karen[/QUOTE]

Thanks. I posted this without noticing first the other threads of same nature. Are you the one who called it a "K-hole"? And does the question mark there to be placed before the quotaton mark?





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