It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Schizophrenia Message Board


Schizophrenia Board Index


Re: Seeing things
Nov 14, 2005
I think either you misunderstood or you need to change doctors.

Whether you have Bipolar or Schizophrenia or just a headache, you treat the symptoms. That rule applies to any type of mental or physical illness. You treat only the symptoms of what is wrong.

To have Bipolar you have to have depression and mania, however some people have what is referred to as mixed mood which is a combination of mixed moods. People who have depression and psychosis only are said to have 'psychotic depression and aren't Bipolar. Schizophrenics (which also includes Schizoaffectives), Bipolars and people who suffer from psychotic depression have many different types of hallucinations ranging from auditory (hearing things), visual, sensory (feeling things on the skin or in the body which aren't there or don't happen) and olfactory (smelling things which don't exist). Hallucinations range from a spectrum of anything imaginable. When a Bipolar and a Schizophrenic have a visual hallucination it is exactly the same. In both cases is is seen EXACTLY the same. And of course it is seen 'only in the head' as in both cases what is imagined, which seems so real, is not really there. Also, it is generally considered that people who have olfactory hallucinations (smelling things which do not exist) have a poorer prognosis in general.

Schizophrenics, Bipolars and psychotic depressives also have something similiar to hallucinations of thought and memory and the word for it is 'delusions'. They either think something is happening which isn't (which can be very elaborate and grandiose) or remember things which happened that never happened. A delusion is like a extensive hallucination of thought and memory and can be worse than the actual hallucinations themselves.

All of the psychotic disorders can have paranoia because of the content of the hallucinations and delusions which can lead to anxiety and panic attacks.

Generally Schizophrenias, with the exception of Schizoaffective Disorder, do not have mood symptoms, in other words they don't get depressed or manic. On the other hand, Bipolars can have racing thoughts. Certain reactions to medicine can cause both Bipolar and Schizophrenics to have racing thoughts, which doesn't make a Schizophrenic a Bipolar. A person has to have more than one symptom of an illness to be considered in that category.

The most important thing to remember is not whether you are either Schizo, Bipolar or a depressive psychotic, but to treat the symptoms, as there is no test to determine which illness a person has when it comes to mental ilness.

Generally most people who are mentally ill will have a changing diagnosis over the course of the illness and some will even have multiple diagnosis. The diagnosis isn't as important as the treating the symptoms. Don't worry about which of the two illnesses you have because both are lifelong and require medicine.

Do worry about the information that a doctor gives you and make sure is is correct and not an opinion such as what you will receive when you talk to a non professional such as myself. Make sure your doctor is current with medical technology. Make sure that your doctor knows more about mental illness than I do because I am just a patient.

When people are first diagnosed they spend days and days wondering what is wrong with them and have trouble moving beyond that point. To get well you need to accept the symptoms and treat them by taking all the medicine the doctor prescribes to you regularly.

Also you have to remember there is no scientist on earth, even if he took your brain out and examined it, that can distinguish between any type of mental illness because there are no tests and no clinical changes in the brain that are visual to make a determination of what is wrong no matter whether it is extremes, of say, autism or Schizophrenia.

Also, it is worth noting, Schizophrenia, although a serious brain disorder, has a better prognosis and requires less types of medicine to treat it than Bipolar as we don't have mood symptoms on top of psychosis (unless of course we have Schizoaffective Disorder) while Bipolar generally worsens over time, which Schizophrenia does not. 1/3 of Schizophrenics recover completely over a lifetime where as Bipolars do not althoug their hallucinations may clear up. The reason for that is every year once a person reachs 35 or 40 years old, Dopamine cells begin die off in the brain, and that happens whether a person is normal or Schizophrenic or Bipolar. It is excess Dopamine which causes the hallucinations and delusions in all types of mental illness. Bipolar Disorder, however, involves other brain processes which are not known.

To get well you need to ask questions to better understand your symptoms, take your medicine and simply move on and forget about a diagnosis. Once you move past the stage of wondering what is exactly wrong with you and start treating the symptoms you'll be on the road to recovery which will include a lifetime of adherence to medicine and commitment to being well.
Re: Seeing things
Nov 14, 2005
[QUOTE=barkingshark]I think either you misunderstood or you need to change doctors.

Whether you have Bipolar or Schizophrenia or just a headache, you treat the symptoms. That rule applies to any type of mental or physical illness. You treat only the symptoms of what is wrong.

To have Bipolar you have to have depression and mania, however some people have what is referred to as mixed mood which is a combination of mixed moods. People who have depression and psychosis only are said to have 'psychotic depression and aren't Bipolar. Schizophrenics (which also includes Schizoaffectives), Bipolars and people who suffer from psychotic depression have many different types of hallucinations ranging from auditory (hearing things), visual, sensory (feeling things on the skin or in the body which aren't there or don't happen) and olfactory (smelling things which don't exist). Hallucinations range from a spectrum of anything imaginable. When a Bipolar and a Schizophrenic have a visual hallucination it is exactly the same. In both cases is is seen EXACTLY the same. And of course it is seen 'only in the head' as in both cases what is imagined, which seems so real, is not really there. Also, it is generally considered that people who have olfactory hallucinations (smelling things which do not exist) have a poorer prognosis in general.

Schizophrenics, Bipolars and psychotic depressives also have something similiar to hallucinations of thought and memory and the word for it is 'delusions'. They either think something is happening which isn't (which can be very elaborate and grandiose) or remember things which happened that never happened. A delusion is like a extensive hallucination of thought and memory and can be worse than the actual hallucinations themselves.

All of the psychotic disorders can have paranoia because of the content of the hallucinations and delusions which can lead to anxiety and panic attacks.

Generally Schizophrenias, with the exception of Schizoaffective Disorder, do not have mood symptoms, in other words they don't get depressed or manic. On the other hand, Bipolars can have racing thoughts. Certain reactions to medicine can cause both Bipolar and Schizophrenics to have racing thoughts, which doesn't make a Schizophrenic a Bipolar. A person has to have more than one symptom of an illness to be considered in that category.

The most important thing to remember is not whether you are either Schizo, Bipolar or a depressive psychotic, but to treat the symptoms, as there is no test to determine which illness a person has when it comes to mental ilness.

Generally most people who are mentally ill will have a changing diagnosis over the course of the illness and some will even have multiple diagnosis. The diagnosis isn't as important as the treating the symptoms. Don't worry about which of the two illnesses you have because both are lifelong and require medicine.

Do worry about the information that a doctor gives you and make sure is is correct and not an opinion such as what you will receive when you talk to a non professional such as myself. Make sure your doctor is current with medical technology. Make sure that your doctor knows more about mental illness than I do because I am just a patient.

When people are first diagnosed they spend days and days wondering what is wrong with them and have trouble moving beyond that point. To get well you need to accept the symptoms and treat them by taking all the medicine the doctor prescribes to you regularly.

Also you have to remember there is no scientist on earth, even if he took your brain out and examined it, that can distinguish between any type of mental illness because there are no tests and no clinical changes in the brain that are visual to make a determination of what is wrong no matter whether it is extremes, of say, autism or Schizophrenia.

Also, it is worth noting, Schizophrenia, although a serious brain disorder, has a better prognosis and requires less types of medicine to treat it than Bipolar as we don't have mood symptoms on top of psychosis (unless of course we have Schizoaffective Disorder) while Bipolar generally worsens over time, which Schizophrenia does not. 1/3 of Schizophrenics recover completely over a lifetime where as Bipolars do not althoug their hallucinations may clear up. The reason for that is every year once a person reachs 35 or 40 years old, Dopamine cells begin die off in the brain, and that happens whether a person is normal or Schizophrenic or Bipolar. It is excess Dopamine which causes the hallucinations and delusions in all types of mental illness. Bipolar Disorder, however, involves other brain processes which are not known.

To get well you need to ask questions to better understand your symptoms, take your medicine and simply move on and forget about a diagnosis. Once you move past the stage of wondering what is exactly wrong with you and start treating the symptoms you'll be on the road to recovery which will include a lifetime of adherence to medicine and commitment to being well.[/QUOTE]

Well I did tell her (pdoc) that I thought i had schizoeffective disorder as it seemed more like my symptoms and she said what difference does it make ? both (bipolor and effective) are treated with the same meds... So I just let it go.... but i still dont understand how seeing "Jesus" in my computer is different than that of a schizophrenic experience that is my point...





All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:09 AM.





© 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!