It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Sleep Disorders Message Board


Sleep Disorders Board Index


[QUOTE=MSH]I've tried pretty much every other board without much luck, so I'll try here. Anyone at all experience this: at night when I'm getting ready to fall asleep, I start to see strange geometric shapes, sometimes very bright and colorful, all around me. They look like small spaceshipes or snow falkes that are made out of paper. I open my eyes, and they are still there in the dark. It happens too frequent now. When this happens my body feels as though its floating and often times I get tingling and numbess accompanied by it. when I stand up and walk around it goes away, but when I lie back down and am just to fall asleep, it all starts again, the geometric shapes, floating feeling (like on a boat) and tingling/trembling. Anyone please? What is this? It is literally driving me off the deep end. Thanks[/QUOTE]

I don't think it's abnormal, just something that can happen in stage 1 sleep. Below I've pasted a segment from the internet on sleep stages, hope it helps!



During stage 1, which is light sleep, we drift in and out of sleep and can be awakened easily. Our eyes move very slowly and muscle activity slows. People awakened from stage 1 sleep often remember fragmented visual images. Many also experience sudden muscle contractions called hypnic myoclonia, often preceded by a sensation of starting to fall. These sudden movements are similar to the "jump" we make when startled. When we enter stage 2 sleep, our eye movements stop and our brain waves (fluctuations of electrical activity that can be measured by electrodes) become slower, with occasional bursts of rapid waves called sleep spindles. In stage 3, extremely slow brain waves called delta waves begin to appear, interspersed with smaller, faster waves. By stage 4, the brain produces delta waves almost exclusively. It is very difficult to wake someone during stages 3 and 4, which together are called deep sleep. There is no eye movement or muscle activity. People awakened during deep sleep do not adjust immediately and often feel groggy and disoriented for several minutes after they wake up. Some children experience bedwetting, night terrors, or sleepwalking during deep sleep.

When we switch into REM sleep, our breathing becomes more rapid, irregular, and shallow, our eyes jerk rapidly in various directions, and our limb muscles become temporarily paralyzed. Our heart rate increases, our blood pressure rises, and males develop penile erections. When people awaken during REM sleep, they often describe bizarre and illogical tales — dreams.

The first REM sleep period usually occurs about 70 to 90 minutes after we fall asleep. A complete sleep cycle takes 90 to 110 minutes on average. The first sleep cycles each night contain relatively short REM periods and long periods of deep sleep. As the night progresses, REM sleep periods increase in length while deep sleep decreases. By morning, people spend nearly all their sleep time in stages 1, 2, and REM.

People awakened after sleeping more than a few minutes are usually unable to recall the last few minutes before they fell asleep. This sleep-related form of amnesia is the reason people often forget telephone calls or conversations they’ve had in the middle of the night. It also explains why we often do not remember our alarms ringing in the morning if we go right back to sleep after turning them off.





All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:24 AM.





© 2020 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!