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[B]Well alright now!!! Congratulations on day 8!!! You're doing pretty damned good there. Pat on the back to you!!![/B]

Wow, you sound just like me nine months ago. Trust me, it really does get much better with time.

As far as the "Pros":

Nicotine used to cause your veins to become constricted all the time. Now that you quit, blood is flowing far more evenly throughout your body. So libido is going to be up. You'll have more energy. You can breath deeper. Your not out of breath when you get to the top of the stairs any more. Very cool...

You are quite right about smoke smelling pretty bad while on Chantix. Smells just as bad when you get off of it. What's happening is the Chantix will not allow your brain to process the "Aaaahhh" feeling any more. So now you are smelling smoke the way every non-smoker does. Almost smells like burning leaves, huh? "Yuck" is right... I still smell it around the house every once in awhile. Smoke is so damned destructive!!! Sheesh...

As for as the "Cons":

I offer you the following to muddle over. What you are feeling right now is very normal and will definitely subside with time.

Trust me, smoking is no longer an option. You definitely don't want to have to go through this again. No, no, no... :nono:

[COLOR="Blue"][B]Nicotine withdrawal symptoms:[/B]

Irritability, mood swings, restlessness, insomnia, fatigue,
inability to concentrate, sore throat, cough, congestion, headache,
increased appetite constipation, gas, stomach pain, dry mouth,
sore tongue/gums , postnasal drip, tightness in the chest.

[B]Chantix side effects:[/B]

Headache, sleep problems, insomnia, unusual dreams, nausea, stomach pain,
indigestion, vomiting, constipation, gas, weakness, tired feeling, increased appitite, unpleasant taste in your mouth.[/COLOR]

Hope this helps...

I had a lot of these symptoms, though not all certainly.

One thing that surprised the daylights out of me was that I actually started to calm down after a few days. Way more then when I smoked. I really mellowed out more with time.

Be reminded that any crave you have will never last longer then three minutes. It's a fact! Try timing it some time. I know - seems like forever. But with Chantix the craving goes POOF! in less then 30 seconds.

For me, what really helped was researching all the postings here and else where on the internet.

Knowledge is power!!!

Glad to hear you are doing so incredibly well. Hang in there buddy, you're doing just fine.

Kevin__
Yes sir, it's called insomnia. It's a nicotine withdrawal symptom. It'll go away with time. However if it becomes too much for you, I know of others on this board (from way back when) who actually cut back on the Chantix to 1MG in the morning and 1/2 MG at night. Some found that if they took the pill at 5:00pm then the side effects passed by bed time.

Now I do not know if you are a caffeine addict like I am, but here is some pretty interesting stuff you may want to consider. (Love that Starbucks...)

I posted this back in March:

[COLOR="Blue"]Not sure if you will find this helpful or not, however I pulled this off the web and thought you might find it at least interesting. I know I did.

[B]The nicotine withdrawal symptoms (such as irritability, headache, or difficulty sleeping) may be severe for some - especially if the cigarettes smoked [U]contain high levels of nicotine[/U][/B]

The article was written by a smoking cessation specialist by the name of Terry Martin.

Kevin__

Insomnia When You Quit Smoking
From Terry Martin,
Your Guide to Smoking Cessation.

I can't sleep!

Sleep disturbances are a common side effect of nicotine withdrawal. Some people will sleep much more than usual through this phase of cessation, while others have difficulty getting any sleep at all. If you find yourself suffering from insomnia during the first few weeks after you quit smoking, try a few of these natural remedies to ease your discomforts.

Cut out the caffeine. Caffeine is a stimulant. Most people know this, but here's a fact that is less widely known: caffeine in the body of a smoker is metabolized(digested) at about twice the rate as that of a nonsmoker. The result is a high tolerance to caffeine. When you quit smoking, the amount of coffee or colas you're used to drinking might now make you very jittery and anxious. Cut back on, or cut out caffeine completely for awhile, especially if youíre having trouble sleeping through the night. Chances are good that once you're through the withdrawal process, you'll be able to drink coffee again, though maybe not as much as you used to.

Take a warm bath. This is one of my personal favorite ways to relax and destress. I recommend it often, and YES, itís good for the guys too! Light a few candles, use some scented bath salts, and submerge!

Get a massage. Enlist your spouse or other willing pair of hands to help work the stress out of your muscles. If you can get a full body massage, great, but even 10 or 15 minutes spent on your neck, shoulders, face and scalp can really work wonders to relax you to the point of being ready to sleep.

Have a cup of herbal tea. There are a variety of teas on the market today blended specifically to help soothe and promote sleep. Take a look at the tea section in the supermarket, or visit your local health food store and ask for suggestions.

Listen to some soothing music. Soft, mellow music can go a long way towards relaxing you enough to drift off to sleep. You may want to try listening to a recording of waves hitting the beach - soft sounds can be a very good sleep aid. Make sure you have a player that will turn itself off - you donít want to have to get up and do it yourself - defeats the purpose!

Have a glass of warm milk. Spice it up with a little honey and cardamom or nutmeg. It could well be that the reason warm milk helps us sleep is due to the fact that it is a food rich in the amino acid L-tryptophan. L-tryptophan helps the body produce neurotransmitters such as seratonin. Neurotransmitters are chemical nerve messengers that tell our bodies to shut down at night, as well as helping us to be fully awake during the day. More of the L-tryptophan in milk gets delivered to your brain when you eat a carbohydrate along with it. No wonder milk and cookies have long been a favorite bedtime snack.

Other foods containing the amino acid L-tryptophan:

chicken
eggs
turkey
dairy productsÖmilk, cheese, yogurt
watermelon
cashews

Donít drink alcohol. It disrupts sleep. Though a few drinks may make it easier to fall asleep initially, a person will often wake up just a few hours into their sleep cycle. Frequently, sleep is then intermittent for the remainder of the night.

Get some exercise. Even a short 15 minute walk will help, but if you can't sleep, try getting out for a nice long walk a few hours before bed.

Meditate. The value of this exercise is in letting the stress of your day go. Start out by laying quietly, eyes closed, for 5 minutes. When thoughts come, acknowledge them and let them go. Let your mind drift. Build the time up that you do this activity gradually. Itís a terrific way to relax and slow down enough to sleep. Adding meditation to your daily routine will reward you with improved control and calmness throughout your day.

Read a good book. Climb into bed and settle in for some reading. It never fails to put me out, usually within the first 5 pages.

Avoid naps. While it may feel good to get a bit of sleep in during the day, if you're suffering from insomnia, you need to skip the naps.

Get up earlier. Another useful technique to help you shift your internal clock so that youíre sleepy come bedtime.

Remember, the physical withdrawal phase of quitting tobacco is a temporary condition. Your sleep patterns will return to normal soon, providing you didnít have insomnia before cessation. If symptoms persist beyond the first month or so, schedule a visit with your doctor.[/COLOR]





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