It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Spinal Cord Disorders Message Board


Spinal Cord Disorders Board Index


Just a few observations...

- I don't know anything about carpal tunnel syndrome, other than it's a wrist/hand problem. So how could it affect your shoulder? Also, how likely is it to affect both sides at once, how likely is it to be an on-off thing, and how likely is it to NOT be motion dependent? Those are questions someone else can hopefully answer.

- BTW, I should have asked you, are your symptoms motion-dependent? That is, do you have to move, and move in a specific way, to predictably cause symptoms, or do they seem to come on their own? If the latter, that seems like another vote against carpal tunnel, but I'd like to see what someone else has to say.

- If you have a cervical spinal cord impairment, that can affect all lower levels. So, your back/leg problems could have a cervical origin, or they might not, or your leg problem might have a cervical origin and your back pain be unrelated. From your description, I would GUESS that you have a lumbar spine problem, especially if the leg symptoms only occur AT THE SAME TIME as the sharp back pains.

- From your MRI, you seem to have problems - or POTENTIAL problems - at only two levels. The disk between your C5 and C6 vertebrae (the C5-6 disk) is being pushed somewhat out the back and into the spinal canal (thecal sac). It would be nice if your radiologist would better articulate how MUCH it is indenting the sac, but I guess he didn't think that necessary.

- At C6-7 you have a somewhat more serious problem. The C6-7 disk is pushing even farther out of place and causing moderate narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal canal (effectively, the same thing as the thecal sac he referred at the C5-6). You should know that, in radiologist-speak, "moderate" is just one step below "severe", so not as good as it sounds. Once again, a little more color would be nice. Is the disk impinging on the spinal CORD (serious problem) or is it only impinging on the surrounding spinal CANAL (something to be watched)?

- Also at C6-7, your protruding disk is pushing into the foraminal openings. These are holes in the bony cage that surrounds the spinal canal in back. Your peripheral nerves leave the spinal cord, pass through the foraminal openings, and - at that level - head down to your shoulders and arms. If the disk is causing narrowing (stenosis) in the foramina, then it may be pressing on those peripheral nerves (a condition called "radiculopathy") and causing a whole range of symptoms in your arms, both sensory and motor.

- All in all, there's nothing in your MRI that jumps out and says "this IS the problem", but both problems at C6-7 (foraminal and canal) say "this COULD BE the problem".

- Once again, your cervical problem COULD be causing leg problems, or you could easily have an even worse problem in your lumbar spine that's causing BOTH back pain and leg problems. Unfortunately, that's pretty common.

Have you taken this MRI to a specialist? (neurologist, neurosurgeon, or orthopedic spine surgeon) Sometimes, they may read an MRI very differently than the radiologist does.

So, you might want to (1) get another set of eyes on that MRI and (2) get a lumbar MRI as well (and a different radiologist to read it).





All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:53 PM.





© 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!