It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Spinal Cord Disorders Message Board


Spinal Cord Disorders Board Index


Hi,
I'm new to this board (but a regular on the back problems board as I'll be having a decompression surgery on L3,L4,L5 sometime this year for severe spinal stenosis and extensive facet arthritis).

I just got the results of my C-spine T-spine MRI: Any insight would be appreciated.

C2-C3, C3-C4, C4-C5: Unremarkable! (THANK GOD!!!)

C5-C6: Irregular left foraminal & paramedian disc spur complex causes mild anterior impression upon the cord and mild to moderate left foraminal stenosis. Central canal is lower normal caliber. Right foramen is patent.

C6-C7: Shallow disc-spur complex is present. There is some anterior cord flattening. Central canal & foramina are lower normal caliber.

C7-T1: Unremarkable! (THANK GOD!!!)

T- Spine: Unremarkable! (THANK GOD!!!)

IMPRESSION:
1. Mild to modrate left foraminal stenosis C5-C6 due to left paramedian and foraminal uncovertebral spur.
2. Borderline central canal & foraminal stenosis C6-C7 due to shallow broad-based disc spur complex.

I understand foraminal stenosis and basic stenosis but this is what I don't understand:

1) central canal & foramina being lower normal caliber?

2) Right foramen is patent...what is that?

3) Anterior cord flattening?

4) What is the difference between stenosis and then cord flattening? I know that the spinal cord stops at T12....so I am really concerned about the cord flattening....like is there potential for paralysis?

Thanks for reading and hopefully commenting on this.

Let Me Walk
<< 1) central canal & foramina being lower normal caliber? >>

I haven't seen that terminology before. Unless it has some specific medical meaning, I would go with the obvious, which is that the canal and foramina are less than optimal, but still acceptable.

<< 2) Right foramen is patent...what is that? >>

Patent = unobstructed

<< 3) Anterior cord flattening? >>

The cord, which should be roundish, has been flattened in front.

<< 4) What is the difference between stenosis and then cord flattening? >>

"Stenosis" just means "narrowing", and is usually applied to a passageway, like the spinal canal or the foramina. A person may be born with a stenotic spinal canal (I think you may have been), or the canal may become stenotic over time because of intrusions by disks, osteophytes, or swollen ligaments. Cord flattening is a possible consequence of spinal canal stenosis, in that the canal can only be narrowed so much before the buffer for the cord is gone and the cord itself is affected by whatever is intruding into the canal.

<< so I am really concerned about the cord flattening....like is there potential for paralysis? >>

There's POTENTIAL for it, and if you were to suffer some kind of severe trauma (e.g. auto accident) it could be said that you have a head start, but it's more likely that you will develop symptoms more slowly. I wouldn't be surprised if a sizable percentage of people over 60 have some kind of cord impingement, but how often do you see actual paralysis?

What are the symptoms that led you to get the MRI?





All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:52 AM.





© 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!